Details

Innovation Economics, Engineering and Management Handbook 2


Innovation Economics, Engineering and Management Handbook 2

Special Themes
1. Aufl.

von: Dimitri Uzunidis, Fedoua Kasmi, Laurent Adatto

126,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 08.06.2021
ISBN/EAN: 9781119832515
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 336

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

<p>Innovation, in economic activity, in managerial concepts and in engineering design, results from creative activities, entrepreneurial strategies and the business climate. Innovation leads to technological, organizational and commercial changes, due to the relationships between enterprises, public institutions and civil society organizations. These innovation networks create new knowledge and contribute to the dissemination of new socio-economic and technological models, through new production and marketing methods. <p><i>Innovation Economics, Engineering and Management Handbook 2</i> is the second of the two volumes that comprise this book. The main objectives across both volumes are to study the innovation processes in today's information and knowledge society; to analyze how links between research and business have intensified; and to discuss the methods by which innovation emerges and is managed by firms, not only from a local perspective but also a global one. <p>The studies presented in these two volumes contribute toward an understanding of the systemic nature of innovations and enable reflection on their potential applications, in order to think about the meaning of growth and prosperity
<p>Introduction xvii<br /><i>Dimitri UZUNIDIS and Fedoua KASMI</i></p> <p><b>Chapter 1. Meaning – The Meaning of Innovation: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives </b><b>1<br /></b><i>Joëlle FOREST</i></p> <p>1.1. Introduction 1</p> <p>1.2. Conceptions of the meaning of innovation over time 3</p> <p>1.3. When innovation, like the phoenix, rises from the ashes 5</p> <p>1.4. In search of lost meaning 8</p> <p>1.5. The PSI approach: a philosophy of, and for, action 11</p> <p>1.6. By way of conclusion 15</p> <p>1.7. References 15</p> <p><b>Chapter 2. Engineering – Innovation Engineering: A Holistic and Operational Approach to the Innovation Process </b><b>19<br /></b><i>Laure MOREL and Mauricio CAMARGO</i></p> <p>2.1. Introduction 19</p> <p>2.2. Innovation engineering: a field of research that has struggled to structure itself in France 21</p> <p>2.3. Practical guide to innovation engineering 32</p> <p>2.3.1. First bias: there are no good or bad innovative ideas! 33</p> <p>2.3.2. Second bias: any innovation process requires contextualization of the situation 34</p> <p>2.3.3. Third bias: there is no innovative project management without collaboration 35</p> <p>2.3.4. Fourth bias: a universal innovation process does not exist! 35</p> <p>2.3.5. Fifth bias: the importance of materializing and evaluating ideas as early as possible by including users in the process 36</p> <p>2.4. Conclusion 37</p> <p>2.5. Acknowledgments 38</p> <p>2.6. References 39</p> <p><b>Chapter 3. Absorption – Technological Absorptive Capacity and Innovation: The Primacy of Knowledge </b><b>43<br /></b><i>Sonia BEN SLIMANE</i></p> <p>3.1. Introduction 43</p> <p>3.2. Technological absorptive capacity: a cognitive process 43</p> <p>3.3. The multidimensional nature of absorption capacity and innovation 45</p> <p>3.4. Measuring absorptive capacity 46</p> <p>3.5. Conclusion 47</p> <p>3.6. References 48</p> <p><b>Chapter 4. Big Data – Artificial Intelligence and Innovation: The Big Data Issue </b><b>51<br /></b><i>Laurent DUPONT</i></p> <p>4.1. Introduction 51</p> <p>4.2. Humans and data: diversity and consensus 52</p> <p>4.3. Big Data: an interdisciplinary approach to technology and its uses 54</p> <p>4.4. A wide range of applications: promises and fears 55</p> <p>4.5. Conclusion 56</p> <p>4.6. References 57</p> <p><b>Chapter 5. Blockchain – Blockchain and Co-creation within Management Methods </b><b>59<br /></b><i>Eric SEULLIET</i></p> <p>5.1. Introduction 59</p> <p>5.2. The interest of Blockchain in the field of immaterial exchanges 60</p> <p>5.3. The limits of the co-creation process 61</p> <p>5.4. Blockchain in mobilizing and organizing co-creation processes 62</p> <p>5.5. The promises of Blockchain 63</p> <p>5.5.1. Intellectual property renewal 63</p> <p>5.5.2. “Empowerment” of individuals 63</p> <p>5.5.3. Scaling up 64</p> <p>5.5.4. Collective intelligence 64</p> <p>5.5.5. New forms of organization and social impact 64</p> <p>5.5.6. Necessary developments 64</p> <p>5.6. Conclusion 65</p> <p>5.7. References 66</p> <p><b>Chapter 6. Bricolage – From Improvisation to Innovation: The Key Role of “Bricolage” </b><b>67<br /></b><i>Paul BOUVIER-PATRON</i></p> <p>6.1. Introduction 67</p> <p>6.2. Bricolage: new concept, old practice 67</p> <p>6.3. Current application of the bricolage concept 68</p> <p>6.4. Bricolage and improvisation 69</p> <p>6.5. Bricolage and frugal innovation 70</p> <p>6.6. Conclusion 72</p> <p>6.7. References 73</p> <p><b>Chapter 7. Circularity – The Circular Economy as an Innovative Process </b><b>75<br /></b><i>Sonia VEYSSIÈRE</i></p> <p>7.1. Introduction 75</p> <p>7.2. The circular economy: a transformative concept 76</p> <p>7.3. The circular economy as a source of innovation 77</p> <p>7.4. Conclusion 81</p> <p>7.5. References 82</p> <p><b>Chapter 8. Co-creation – Co-creation and Innovation: Strategic Issues for the Company </b><b>85<br /></b><i>Paul BOUVIER-PATRON</i></p> <p>8.1. Introduction 85</p> <p>8.2. Co-creation: a strategic challenge for companies 86</p> <p>8.3. Co-creation, DIY and DIWO 87</p> <p>8.4. Co-creation, creativity and innovation 88</p> <p>8.5. Co-creation and intellectual property rights 89</p> <p>8.6. Co-creation and eco-design 90</p> <p>8.7. Conclusion 90</p> <p>8.8. References 91</p> <p><b>Chapter 9. Community – Innovative Communities of Practice: What are the Conditions for Implementation and Innovation? </b><b>93<br /></b><i>Diane-Gabrielle TREMBLAY</i></p> <p>9.1. Introduction: communities of practice and innovation 93</p> <p>9.2. Communities of practices, a definition: group cohesion, complicity and dynamism 94</p> <p>9.3. Work teams and virtual communities 95</p> <p>9.4. Organizational learning 97</p> <p>9.5. Animation role 97</p> <p>9.6. Conclusion 98</p> <p>9.7. References 99</p> <p><b>Chapter 10. Craftsman – The Innovative Craftsman: A Historically Permanent Socio-economic Function </b><b>101<br /></b><i>Sophie BOUTILLIER and Claude FOURNIER</i></p> <p>10.1. Introduction 101</p> <p>10.2. The craftsman, an ignored innovator 102</p> <p>10.3. The innovative craftsman of the 21st century 103</p> <p>10.4. Conclusion 106</p> <p>10.5. References 106</p> <p><b>Chapter 11. Defense – Military Innovation: Networks and Dual-use Technological Development </b><b>109<br /></b><i>Pierre BARBAROUX</i></p> <p>11.1. Introduction 109</p> <p>11.2. Military innovation: main attributes 110</p> <p>11.2.1. Military innovation as a knowledge-intensive and dual process 110</p> <p>11.2.2. Military innovation as a technology-driven process 111</p> <p>11.2.3. Military innovation as a demand-oriented process 112</p> <p>11.3. Conclusion 113</p> <p>11.4. References 114</p> <p><b>Chapter 12. Design Thinking – Design Thinking and Strategic Management of Innovation </b><b>115<br /></b><i>Bérangère L. SZOSTAK</i></p> <p>12.1. Introduction 115</p> <p>12.2. The origins of design thinking 116</p> <p>12.3. Design thinking in innovation management 117</p> <p>12.4. Conclusion 119</p> <p>12.5. References 119</p> <p><b>Chapter 13. Digital – Digital Entrepreneurship as Innovative Entrepreneurship </b><b>121<br /></b><i>Birgit LEICK and Mehtap ALDOGAN EKLUND</i></p> <p>13.1. Introduction 121</p> <p>13.2. Definition and characteristics of digital entrepreneurship 122</p> <p>13.3. Digital entrepreneurship in the field of innovation studies 124</p> <p>13.4. Conclusion 126</p> <p>13.5. References 126</p> <p><b>Chapter 14. Entrepreneurship – Social Innovative Entrepreneurship: An Integrated Multi-level Model </b><b>129<br /></b><i>Susanne GRETZINGER</i></p> <p>14.1. Introduction 129</p> <p>14.2. State-of-the-art: contemporary issues, approaches and levels of analysis 130</p> <p>14.3. Integrated multi-level model of innovative social entrepreneurship 132</p> <p>14.4. Conclusion 133</p> <p>14.5. References 134</p> <p><b>Chapter 15. Fintech – Technology in Finance: Strategic Risks and Challenges </b><b>137<br /></b><i>Arvind ASHTA</i></p> <p>15.1. Introduction 137</p> <p>15.2. Evolution of technology in finance 138</p> <p>15.3. Risks of fintech 141</p> <p>15.4. Concluding remarks 142</p> <p>15.5. References 142</p> <p><b>Chapter 16. Gerontech – Geront’innovations and the Silver Economy </b><b>145<br /></b><i>Blandine LAPERCHE</i></p> <p>16.1. Introduction 145</p> <p>16.2. The Silver Economy: a new area for innovation 146</p> <p>16.3. “Gerontechnologies”: the technological dimension of innovations in the Silver Economy 147</p> <p>16.4. Towards “geront’innovation” 148</p> <p>16.5. Conclusion 151</p> <p>16.6. References 151</p> <p><b>Chapter 17. Greentech – Contributions and Limitations to the Environmental Transition </b><b>153<br /></b><i>Smaïl AÏT-EL-HADJ</i></p> <p>17.1. Introduction 153</p> <p>17.2. Green technologies, the first technological response to the environmental crisis 153</p> <p>17.2.1. New energies 153</p> <p>17.2.2. Information technologies and green technologies 154</p> <p>17.2.3. Biology as a preferred carrier of green technologies 154</p> <p>17.2.4. Nanotechnologies: cross-technology dimension of green technologies 155</p> <p>17.2.5. New services and organizations: recycling, industrial ecology, the economy of functionality 155</p> <p>17.3. From green technologies to a sustainable technological and socio-economic system 156</p> <p>17.3.1. Green technologies are a one-off and partial response to the environmental challenge 156</p> <p>17.3.2. The shifting of boundaries and environmental problems 156</p> <p>17.3.3. The global environmental limit implies responding with a global reconfiguration of the technological system 157</p> <p>17.3.4. The global environmental limit implies a societal reconfiguration beyond technology 157</p> <p>17.3.5. The current criticality of the environmental threat implies a massive and rapid transition 158</p> <p>17.4. References 158</p> <p><b>Chapter 18. Hacker – Hackerspace as a Space for Creative Exploration </b><b>161<br /></b><i>Dave MOBHE BOKOKO</i></p> <p>18.1. Introduction 161</p> <p>18.2. The rise of hacker culture 162</p> <p>18.3. Cybercrime or creative exploration? 163</p> <p>18.4. Conclusion 165</p> <p>18.5. References 165</p> <p><b>Chapter 19. Health – Telemedicine: Decentralized Medical Innovation </b><b>167<br /></b><i>Patricia BAUDIER</i></p> <p>19.1. Introduction 167</p> <p>19.2. Information technology at the service of medical care 167</p> <p>19.3. High-performance medical devices 168</p> <p>19.4. Conclusion 169</p> <p>19.5. References 170</p> <p><b>Chapter 20. Intellectual Corpus – Inventive Intellectual Corpus: Knowledge-based Innovation </b><b>173<br /></b><i>Pierre SAULAIS</i></p> <p>20.1. Introduction 173</p> <p>20.2. Concept of knowledge-based innovation 174</p> <p>20.3. Modeling knowledge creation 176</p> <p>20.4. Activation of the chaotic inspiration model of knowledge evolution by emergence using the <i>ICAROS® </i>method 178</p> <p>20.5. Conclusion 180</p> <p>20.6. References 180</p> <p><b>Chapter 21. Imagination – Imagination, Science Fiction, Creativity and Innovation: An Integrated Process </b><b>181<br /></b><i>Thomas MICHAUD</i></p> <p>21.1. Introduction 181</p> <p>21.2. Tame the imagination in order to innovate 182</p> <p>21.3. Imagination: from creativity to innovation 183</p> <p>21.4. Conclusion 185</p> <p>21.5. References 185</p> <p><b>Chapter 22. Marketing – Marketing of Innovation and University–Industry Collaboration </b><b>187<br /></b><i>Cheikh Abdou Lahad THIAW</i></p> <p>22.1. Introduction 187</p> <p>22.2. Innovation marketing and inter-organizational collaboration 188</p> <p>22.3. The cross-functionality of innovation marketing 190</p> <p>22.4. Conclusion 192</p> <p>22.5. References 192</p> <p><b>Chapter 23. Milieu – Innovative Milieu: The Strength of Proximity Ties </b><b>195<br /></b><i>Fedoua KASMI</i></p> <p>23.1. Introduction 195</p> <p>23.2. Definition and characteristics of an innovative milieu 196</p> <p>23.3. Proximity and territorialized innovation networks 198</p> <p>23.4. Conclusion 199</p> <p>23.5. References 200</p> <p><b>Chapter 24. Nanotech – Nanotechnologies: The Future of Innovations </b><b>201<br /></b><i>Jean-Louis MONINO</i></p> <p>24.1. Introduction 201</p> <p>24.2. Nanotechnology applications 203</p> <p>24.3. RFID chips 203</p> <p>24.4. Global potential risks 204</p> <p>24.5. Conclusion and outlook 205</p> <p>24.6. References 207</p> <p>24.7. Webography 207</p> <p><b>Chapter 25. Novelty – Novelty and Innovation: The Nodal Place of Creativity </b><b>209<br /></b><i>Laure MOREL</i></p> <p>25.1. Introduction 209</p> <p>25.2. Innovation and novelty 210</p> <p>25.3. Creativity as a prerequisite for innovation 213</p> <p>25.4. Conclusion 214</p> <p>25.5. References 214</p> <p><b>Chapter 26. Open – Open Source and Open Data: Filiation, Analogies and Common Dynamics </b><b>217<br /></b><i>Laurent ADATTO</i></p> <p>26.1. Introduction 217</p> <p>26.2. Open source and open data: guiding concepts 218</p> <p>26.3. Open source: process innovation and legal innovation via copyleft 218</p> <p>26.4. Open data: dynamics of open innovation 2.0 in line with open source 220</p> <p>26.5. Conclusion 222</p> <p>26.6. References 222</p> <p><b>Chapter 27. Personality – The Deviant Personality of the Innovative Actor </b><b>225<br /></b><i>Dimitri UZUNIDIS</i></p> <p>27.1. Introduction 225</p> <p>27.2. The actor, the system and the question of the complementarity of roles 226</p> <p>27.3. The deviant personality of the innovator 228</p> <p>27.4. Conclusion 230</p> <p>27.5. References 230</p> <p><b>Chapter 28. Real Estate – Business Real Estate and Innovation: A New Profession for New Spaces </b><b>233<br /></b><i>Frédéric GOUPIL DE BOUILLÉ</i></p> <p>28.1. Introduction 233</p> <p>28.2. The prevalence of the financial referent, reasoning and industrialist practices 234</p> <p>28.3. Weakness of the human resources paradigm applied to real estate 235</p> <p>28.4. Employees empowered by change management 235</p> <p>28.5. Powerful, but inconsistent with regard to use, real estate marketing 236</p> <p>28.6. The real estate market versus the innovative company 237</p> <p>28.7. Conclusion 238</p> <p>28.8. References 239</p> <p><b>Chapter 29. Skills – Innovation and Entrepreneurial Skills</b><b> 241<br /></b><i>Giovanni ZAZZERINI</i></p> <p>29.1. Introduction 241</p> <p>29.2. Innovation skills 242</p> <p>29.3. Entrepreneurial competencies 242</p> <p>29.4. Ideas and opportunities 243</p> <p>29.5. Resources 244</p> <p>29.6. Into action 244</p> <p>29.7. References 246</p> <p><b>Chapter 30. Small Business – Small Business and Innovation: Specificities and Institutional Context </b><b>247<br /></b><i>Son Thi Kim LE</i></p> <p>30.1. Introduction 247</p> <p>30.2. The relation between small business and innovation 248</p> <p>30.2.1. What is small business? 248</p> <p>30.2.2. Small business and innovation 249</p> <p>30.3. The specificity of small business innovation 250</p> <p>30.3.1. Innovation efforts: external knowledge source rather than in-house R&D 250</p> <p>30.3.2. Adopting and adapting external knowledge resources 250</p> <p>30.4. Government support for small business innovation 252</p> <p>30.5. Conclusion 253</p> <p>30.6. References 254</p> <p><b>Chapter 31. Spin-off – Research Spin-off: How the University Fosters Innovative Entrepreneurship </b><b>255<br /></b><i>Elisa SALVADOR</i></p> <p>31.1. Introduction 255</p> <p>31.2. An overview of the development of research spin-offs 256</p> <p>31.3. Main perspectives and taxonomies of research spin-offs 258</p> <p>31.4. Fragility and future avenues for improvement 259</p> <p>31.5. Conclusion 261</p> <p>31.6. References 261</p> <p><b>Chapter 32. Start-up – Start-ups, Venture Capital (SVC) and the Financial Cycle of the SVC System </b><b>263<br /></b><i>Angelo BONOMI</i></p> <p>32.1. Introduction 263</p> <p>32.2. Start-ups 264</p> <p>32.3. Venture capital 265</p> <p>32.4. The SVC system cycle 266</p> <p>32.5. Conclusion 267</p> <p>32.6. References 268</p> <p><b>Chapter 33. Territory – Territorial Dynamics and Innovative Services </b><b>269<br /></b><i>Michelle MONGO</i></p> <p>33.1. Introduction 269</p> <p>33.2. Innovation in services: what are we talking about? 270</p> <p>33.2.1. What does it mean to innovate in services? 270</p> <p>33.2.2. Which service for innovation analysis? 271</p> <p>33.3. Geography of innovation in knowledge-intensive business services and territorial impact 272</p> <p>33.3.1. Stylized facts about the geography of knowledge-intensive business services 272</p> <p>33.3.2. The contribution of knowledge-intensive business services to territorial innovation dynamics 273</p> <p>33.4. Public innovation policy: historical actions and future prospects 273</p> <p>33.5. Conclusion 274</p> <p>33.6. References 275</p> <p><b>Chapter 34. Well-being – Subjective Well-being and Innovation </b><b>277<br /></b><i>Francis MUNIER</i></p> <p>34.1. Introduction 277</p> <p>34.2. Creative destruction impacts subjective well-being 278</p> <p>34.3. A questionable relationship 279</p> <p>34.4. Innovation-care: theoretical approach and applications 280</p> <p>34.5. Conclusion 281</p> <p>34.6. References 282</p> <p>List of Authors 283</p> <p>Index 287</p> <p>Summary of Volume 1 293</p>
<p><b>Dimitri Uzunidis</b> is a Professor of Political Economy and the Honorary President of the Research Network on Innovation in France. He has directed and edited several journals and collections on the study of innovation. As a specialist in change, he provides expertise for various international organizations. <p><b>Fedoua Kasmi,</b> Doctor of Economics, is currently a researcher at the University of Lorraine and a member of the Research Network on Innovation in France. Her research focuses on the analysis of the territorial innovation trajectories and the determinants of the emergence of innovative eco-milieus. <p><b>Laurent Adatto</b> is a Doctor of Economics and Management of Technology and Innovation at CNAM and a researcher and editorial manager of the Research Network on Innovation in France. His research interests include organizations? open source and open innovation strategies, standardization processes and the future of the software and ICT sectors.

Diese Produkte könnten Sie auch interessieren:

Mediation für Dummies
Mediation für Dummies
von: Al Weckert, Monika Oboth
EPUB ebook
21,99 €
Durchstarten
Durchstarten
von: Thomas Gelmi
EPUB ebook
17,99 €
Der Arabische Business Code
Der Arabische Business Code
von: Judith Hornok
EPUB ebook
21,99 €