Details

Black American History For Dummies


Black American History For Dummies


1. Aufl.

von: Ronda Racha Penrice

17,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 19.04.2021
ISBN/EAN: 9781119780878
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 544

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Beschreibungen

<p><b>Go deeper than the Black History you may think you know!</b></p> <p><i>Black American History For Dummies</i> reveals the terrors and struggles and celebrates the triumphs of Black Americans. This handy book goes way beyond what you may have studied in school, digging into the complexities and the intrigues that make up Black America. From slavery and the Civil Rights movement to Black Wall Street, Juneteenth, redlining, and Black Lives Matter, this book offers an accessible resource for understanding the facts and events critical to Black history in America.</p> <p>The history of Black Americans is the history of Americans; Americans dance to Black music, read Black literature, watch Black movies, and whether they know it or not reap the benefits of the vibrant political, athletic, and sociological contributions of Black Americans. With this book, you can dive into history, culture, and beyond. See how far there’s yet to go in the approach to studying Black American culture and ending racism.</p> <ul> <li>Get the authoritative story on the growth and evolution of Black America from slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Civil Rights era through to today</li> <li>Discover the Black artists, musicians, athletes, and leaders who have made the United States what it is</li> <li>Develop a fuller understanding of concerns about police brutality and other front-and-center race issues</li> <li>Find out how every aspect of American life connects to Black history</li> </ul> <p><i>Black American History For Dummies</i> is for anyone who needs to learn or re-learn the true history about Black Americans.</p>
<p><b>Introduction</b><b> 1</b></p> <p>About This Book 2</p> <p>Foolish Assumptions 3</p> <p>Icons Used in This Book 4</p> <p>Where to Go from Here 5</p> <p><b>Part 1: Coming to America</b><b> 7</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 1: The Soul of America</b><b> 9</b></p> <p>A Peek at the Past 10</p> <p>Life before slavery 11</p> <p>Life before emancipation 11</p> <p>Life before civil rights 12</p> <p>Being Black in America Today 14</p> <p>Contributions to history and culture 15</p> <p>Challenges 19</p> <p>Black Pride Goes Mainstream 22</p> <p>Celebrating Black heritage 23</p> <p>Black cultural tourism booms 24</p> <p>Reconciling the Past to Create the Future 26</p> <p>Slavery as an American (not Southern) institution 28</p> <p>Flagging the issue 28</p> <p>A question of reparations 30</p> <p><b>Chapter 2: From Empires to Bondage: Bringing Africans to the Americas</b><b> 33</b></p> <p>Touring African Empires 34</p> <p>Ghana Empire 35</p> <p>Mali 35</p> <p>Songhai 36</p> <p>Interaction with the rest of the world 37</p> <p>Origins of the Transatlantic Slave Trade 38</p> <p>Slavery on the African continent 38</p> <p>Launching the European slave trade 39</p> <p>Enslaving Africans in Latin America and the Caribbean 41</p> <p>Sanctioning and opposing slavery 42</p> <p>Dealing with life enslaved 44</p> <p>Seeking freedom 45</p> <p><b>Chapter 3: The Founding of Black America</b> <b>49</b></p> <p>From Servitude to Slavery 49</p> <p>Inching toward slavery 50</p> <p>Why Africans? 51</p> <p>The Triangular Trade 51</p> <p>The Middle Passage 52</p> <p>The capture 52</p> <p>The voyage 54</p> <p>Safe arrival 55</p> <p>Black Americans and the Revolution 57</p> <p>A bit of background 58</p> <p>Fighting for freedom 58</p> <p>Hope and disappointment 60</p> <p>The Free African Society and the Birth of Black America 61</p> <p><b>Part 2: Long Road to Freedom</b><b> 63</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 4: American Slavery, American Freedom </b><b>65</b></p> <p>American Bondage 66</p> <p>Northern slavery 66</p> <p>Enslaved life in the South 69</p> <p>Before I’d Be a Slave: Fighting the System 73</p> <p>The Slave Codes 74</p> <p>Rebellions 75</p> <p>Running away 79</p> <p>“Free” Black People 81</p> <p>Different paths to freedom 82</p> <p>Perhaps free, but not equal 82</p> <p><b>Chapter 5: Bringing Down the House: Marching toward Civil War and Freedom</b><b> 85</b></p> <p>Picking Fights 86</p> <p>Arguing against slavery 87</p> <p>Arguing for slavery 88</p> <p>Leading the Antislavery Assault: Key Abolitionists 89</p> <p>Anthony Benezet 89</p> <p>David Walker 90</p> <p>William Lloyd Garrison 90</p> <p>Frederick Douglass 91</p> <p>Fighting with Words 92</p> <p>Slave narratives 92</p> <p>Origins of the Black press 93</p> <p>Colonization (or Emigration) Movement 94</p> <p>Early resettlement efforts 95</p> <p>Cuffe: Man on a mission 95</p> <p>Questioning motives 96</p> <p>The Effects of Proslavery Politics 96</p> <p>The Fugitive Slave Clause 96</p> <p>Stronger fugitive slave measures: Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 97</p> <p>Battling over the slave status of new land 97</p> <p>The Missouri Compromise 98</p> <p>The Underground Railroad 98</p> <p>Operation Freedom 99</p> <p>Key people along the line 99</p> <p>Message in the music 103</p> <p>The Breaking Point 103</p> <p>Straining North-South relations 104</p> <p>The Compromise of 1850 104</p> <p>The Kansas-Nebraska Act 105</p> <p>Slavery continues 105</p> <p>Dred Scott: A strike against freedom 106</p> <p>Defining events at Harpers Ferry 106</p> <p>Facing the Moment of Truth 107</p> <p><b>Chapter 6: Up from Slavery: Civil War and Reconstruction</b> <b>109</b></p> <p>The Question: To End Slavery or Not? 110</p> <p>Teetering on a tightrope 110</p> <p>The first Confiscation Act, 1861 111</p> <p>Black People in the Early Days of the Civil War 111</p> <p>Serving the Union 112</p> <p>Surviving in the South 112</p> <p>Moving toward the Emancipation Proclamation 113</p> <p>Shutting down the illegal slave trade 113</p> <p>Passing the Second Confiscation Act 114</p> <p>Courting England’s support 114</p> <p>Free at Last (Well, Sort of): The Emancipation Proclamation 114</p> <p>What the Proclamation did 115</p> <p>Reaction to the order 115</p> <p>Finally in the Fight 116</p> <p>As Union soldiers 116</p> <p>As Confederate soldiers 118</p> <p>The War’s End and the Thirteenth Amendment 119</p> <p>(Re)constructing Democracy 121</p> <p>Undermining Lincoln’s plan 121</p> <p>Taking back the power: Reconstruction Act of 1867 123</p> <p>A Mixed Bag of Hope and Despair 123</p> <p>The Freedmen’s Bureau 123</p> <p>Where’s my 40 acres and a mule? 124</p> <p>Back to the land 127</p> <p>Finding a new way 128</p> <p>Banking on wealth 128</p> <p>Taking office 129</p> <p>The Fifteenth Amendment 130</p> <p>A Turn for the Worse: The End of Reconstruction 131</p> <p>The Redeemers 131</p> <p>The Mississippi Plan 132</p> <p>Civil Rights Act of 1875 132</p> <p>Pulling the plug 132</p> <p><b>Part 3: Pillars of Change: The Civil Rights Movement</b><b> 135</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 7: Living Jim Crow</b><b> 137</b></p> <p>Post-Reconstruction Blues 137</p> <p>The Exoduster Movement 138</p> <p>Black Town, U.S.A. 139</p> <p>Lynchings and riots/massacres 140</p> <p>Instituting Jim Crow: Plessy v. Ferguson 146</p> <p>Court cases before Plessy 146</p> <p>The actual case: Plessy v. Ferguson 147</p> <p>Strategies for Achieving Equality 147</p> <p>Booker T. Washington: The Accommodationist 148</p> <p>W.E.B. Du Bois: The Integrationist 148</p> <p>Organizing for Freedom 150</p> <p>National Afro-American Council 150</p> <p>The National Negro Business League 150</p> <p>The Niagara Movement 152</p> <p>The NAACP 153</p> <p>The National Urban League 154</p> <p>Keep on Moving: The Great Migration 154</p> <p>Leaving the South 154</p> <p>Life up North 156</p> <p>Marcus Garvey: Man with a Plan 156</p> <p>Advocating racial pride 157</p> <p>Going “Back to Africa” 157</p> <p>Powerful enemies 158</p> <p>Can’t Catch a Break: The Depression Years and FDR 158</p> <p>FDR: Friend or foe? 159</p> <p>Striking a new deal 159</p> <p>Can’t Fool Us Twice: Black Americans and WWII 161</p> <p><b>Chapter 8: I, Too, Sing America: The Civil Rights Movement, 1954–1963</b> <b>163</b></p> <p>The Tide Turns: Brown v. Board of Education (1954) 163</p> <p>The 1954 ruling and the reaction 164</p> <p>Desegregating Central High School 167</p> <p>Massive resistance follows in Virginia 169</p> <p>Putting a Face to Racial Violence: Emmett Till 169</p> <p>Emmett Till’s murder 170</p> <p>The outrage of the nation 170</p> <p>A New Twist in Leadership: Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 171</p> <p>Adopting the philosophy of nonviolence 172</p> <p>Founding the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) 173</p> <p>Sit-ins, Boycotts, and Marches: The King Era of the Civil Rights Movement Begins 173</p> <p>The Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks 174</p> <p>Sitting in for justice 177</p> <p>Founding SNCC 179</p> <p>Riding for freedom 179</p> <p>The Albany Movement: A chink in the armor 180</p> <p>Integrating Ole Miss and Increasing Federal Involvement 181</p> <p>1963: A Bloody Year 182</p> <p>Not-so-sweet home Alabama: Birmingham 182</p> <p>Murder in Mississippi: Medgar Evers 184</p> <p>March of All Marches: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963) 185</p> <p><b>Chapter 9: Turning Up the Heat (1963–1968)</b> <b>187</b></p> <p>Suffering Two Tragic Blows 187</p> <p>Four innocent victims 188</p> <p>JFK dies 189</p> <p>The Civil Rights Act of 1964 189</p> <p>Targeting Mississippi for Voter Registration: Freedom Summer 190</p> <p>Getting ready 190</p> <p>Getting out the Black vote 191</p> <p>Mississippi burning 192</p> <p>The success of Freedom Summer 192</p> <p>Oh Lord Selma: Back in Alabama 193</p> <p>Getting arrested again 194</p> <p>Marching from Selma to Montgomery 194</p> <p>The Voting Rights Act of 1965 195</p> <p>Black Power Rising 196</p> <p>The Nation of Islam 196</p> <p>Malcolm X 197</p> <p>The Black Panther Party 199</p> <p>The transformation of SNCC 200</p> <p>Race Relations in the North 201</p> <p>Rioting in Watts 201</p> <p>The Chicago Freedom Movement 202</p> <p>The Poor People’s March 203</p> <p>Death of a King 203</p> <p>The night of his death and the mourning after 204</p> <p>Continuing his work 204</p> <p><b>Chapter 10: Where Do We Go from Here? Post–Civil Rights</b> <b>207</b></p> <p>The Panthers Stumble 208</p> <p>Huey Newton: A symbol of Black Power 208</p> <p>The BPP encounters challenges 208</p> <p>Changing focus: Embracing nonviolence and women’s leadership 213</p> <p>Fighting Vietnam 214</p> <p>An unfair fight 214</p> <p>Reacting to the war 215</p> <p>Coming home 215</p> <p>Black Women Taking a Stand 217</p> <p>A Race to Political Office 219</p> <p>Getting a foot in the door in the 1960s 220</p> <p>Making political strides in the 1970s 220</p> <p>Eyeing a bigger prize in the 1980s 221</p> <p>Still thriving in the 1990s and early 2000s 222</p> <p>Money, Money, Money 222</p> <p>Looking at homeownership 222</p> <p>Facing barriers in business 223</p> <p>Successful Black-owned businesses 224</p> <p>Unforeseen Enemies 226</p> <p>Crack cocaine 226</p> <p>HIV/AIDS 228</p> <p>The Racial Divide 229</p> <p>L.A. riots 230</p> <p>The O.J. Simpson verdict 230</p> <p>A modern-day lynching 231</p> <p>Hurricane Katrina 232</p> <p><b>Chapter 11: The New Civil Rights — Obama, Black Lives Matter, and Beyond</b> <b>233</b></p> <p>Gaining the Presidency 234</p> <p>Obama’s 2008 campaign 234</p> <p>The Age of Obama, 2008–2016 235</p> <p>Black community gains 236</p> <p>Black Lives Matter Emerges 238</p> <p>I am Trayvon 239</p> <p>Ferguson explodes: Michael Brown and the impact of Eric Garner’s death 242</p> <p>Police killings continue: Tamir Rice and Laquan McDonald 243</p> <p>Baltimore Rising: Freddie Gray 243</p> <p>The Charleston Church Massacre 244</p> <p>Say her name: Sandra Bland 244</p> <p>Colin Kaepernick Kneels and Donald Trump Reacts 245</p> <p>Trump responds 246</p> <p>Kaepernick opts out of his contract 247</p> <p>Change Gone Come: Trump, COVID-19, and George Floyd 247</p> <p>Trump’s attacks continue 248</p> <p>Stacey Abrams runs for governor in Georgia 249</p> <p>COVID-19 exposes racial disparities 249</p> <p>“Stop killing us”: George Floyd and Breonna Taylor 251</p> <p>The 2020 Election 253</p> <p>Voting in the era of COVID-19 253</p> <p>Trump and the U.S. Capitol riot 256</p> <p><b>Part 4: Cultural Foundations</b><b> 259</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 12: Somebody Say “Amen”: The Black Church</b> <b>261</b></p> <p>Converting to Christianity 262</p> <p>Early objections, early conversions 262</p> <p>The Great Awakenings: Called to convert 263</p> <p>Christianity, Black American style 264</p> <p>Building and Sustaining the Black Church 266</p> <p>Black churches in the North 267</p> <p>The Black church in the antebellum South 268</p> <p>Post–Civil War and Reconstruction 270</p> <p>Worship in the early 20th century 271</p> <p>The modern era: Megachurches 273</p> <p>The changing role of women 274</p> <p>Politics and the Church 275</p> <p>Getting more political 276</p> <p>Minister-politicians: Pulling double duty 276</p> <p>Fighting for civil rights: Minister-activists 277</p> <p>Continuing the struggle 278</p> <p>Worshiping Outside the Black Christian Mainstream 279</p> <p>Muslims and the Nation of Islam 279</p> <p>Black Catholics 281</p> <p>Jehovah’s Witnesses 282</p> <p>Seventh-day Adventists 283</p> <p>Black demagogues 283</p> <p><b>Chapter 13: More Than Reading and Writing: Education</b> <b>285</b></p> <p>A Brief History of Early Black American Education 286</p> <p>Revolting education 286</p> <p>Reconstructing: Education post–Civil War 289</p> <p>20th-Century Educational Milestones 290</p> <p>Mixing it up with the Brown case 290</p> <p>Turning back the clock? 292</p> <p>Vouchers and school choice 292</p> <p>Leaving no child behind? Maybe 293</p> <p>Atlanta Public Schools cheating scandal 294</p> <p>Obama and Trump on education 294</p> <p>Higher Learning 295</p> <p>Launching higher ed for the Black masses 296</p> <p>The Morrill Acts: Making it stick 298</p> <p>Determining the goal of higher education 299</p> <p>Desegregating higher education 303</p> <p>School Daze: The Black Greek system 304</p> <p><b>Chapter 14: Writing Down the Bones: Black Literature</b> <b>307</b></p> <p>Troubled Beginnings 308</p> <p>Early poets 308</p> <p>Slave narratives 310</p> <p>A novel journey 311</p> <p>Writers’ Party: The Harlem Renaissance 314</p> <p>Why Harlem? 315</p> <p>Key Renaissance artists and themes 316</p> <p>Post–World War II, Civil Rights–era Literature 319</p> <p>Richard Wright 320</p> <p>Ralph Ellison 320</p> <p>James Baldwin 321</p> <p>Frank Yerby 321</p> <p>The Breakthrough: The Black Arts Movement 322</p> <p>The beginning of the movement 322</p> <p>Welcoming new voices 322</p> <p>The Black Arts Movement legacy 323</p> <p>Anthologies from the Black Arts Movement 323</p> <p>Black Women’s Words 324</p> <p>Alice Walker 324</p> <p>Toni Morrison 325</p> <p>Black Books from the 1990s On 327</p> <p><b>Chapter 15: The Great Black Way: Theater and Dance</b> <b>331</b></p> <p>Making an Early Statement 332</p> <p>Minstrelsy: Performing in Blackface 333</p> <p>White minstrels 333</p> <p>Black minstrels 334</p> <p>Moving toward Broadway: Black Musical Theater 335</p> <p>More than minstrels 336</p> <p>Williams and Walker on Broadway 336</p> <p>The rumblings of serious Black theater 337</p> <p>Shuffling ahead 340</p> <p>Black Theater Comes of Age 342</p> <p>The Federal Theater Project and Black drama 342</p> <p>The American Negro Theater (ANT) 343</p> <p>A place to call home 344</p> <p>Black musicals, 1940s and beyond 345</p> <p>Two Visionaries 346</p> <p>August Wilson 346</p> <p>George C. Wolfe 347</p> <p>Black Theater in the 21st Century 348</p> <p>Kenny Leon 348</p> <p>Suzan-Lori Parks, Lynn Nottage, Tarell Alvin McCraney, and beyond 349</p> <p>Black Dance in America 351</p> <p>Early dances 351</p> <p>Tap dance 352</p> <p>Breakdancing 353</p> <p>Classical dance forms 354</p> <p><b>Part 5: A Touch of Genius: Music, Film, TV, and Sports</b> <b>357</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 16: Give Me a Beat: Black Music</b> <b>359</b></p> <p>African Roots 359</p> <p>Black Music Fundamentals 360</p> <p>Feeling the Spirit: The Spirituals 361</p> <p>Ragtime 362</p> <p>Singing the Blues 363</p> <p>Blues basics 363</p> <p>Blues genres 364</p> <p>Famous blues musicians 365</p> <p>Let the Good Times Roll: Jazz 367</p> <p>The evolution of jazz styles 367</p> <p>Jazz singers 371</p> <p>Great jazz instrumentalists 372</p> <p>Keeping the tradition alive 374</p> <p>Spreading the Gospel 375</p> <p>Kirk Franklin and the new gospel sound 377</p> <p>Mainstreaming Black Music 378</p> <p>R&B 378</p> <p>Rocking and rolling 379</p> <p>Motown 381</p> <p>Giving America soul 383</p> <p>Post-soul Black music 384</p> <p>Getting funky and popping off 384</p> <p>The hip-hop age of R&B 385</p> <p>Taking the Rap 388</p> <p>Hip hop matures 388</p> <p>The West Coast opens up rap 389</p> <p>Women take the mic 390</p> <p>Trap music emerges 391</p> <p>Lyrical emcees return 392</p> <p><b>Chapter 17: Black Hollywood: Film and Comedy</b><b> 393</b></p> <p>Making Movies Black 394</p> <p>Race movies: Introducing all-Black casts 395</p> <p>Early Black roles in major studio films 398</p> <p>1940s–1960s: Exploring new themes 401</p> <p>1960s–1970s: Blaxploitation films 402</p> <p>Spike Lee and a Black film renaissance 403</p> <p>Hood films 404</p> <p>Stepping out of the hood genre 405</p> <p>The Rise of Black Directors 406</p> <p>Spike Lee: Getting personal 406</p> <p>1990s and early 2000s: The music video launch 407</p> <p>The 2010s: Drama, horror, heroes, and more 408</p> <p>2020: A stream of Black women directors 411</p> <p>Black Film Stars: From Song to Celluloid 412</p> <p>Singers-turned-actors 413</p> <p>Rappers-turned-actors/producers 413</p> <p>Kings and Queens of Comedy 415</p> <p>Richard Pryor 415</p> <p>Eddie Murphy 415</p> <p>Male comedians who followed Pryor and Murphy 416</p> <p>Whoopi Goldberg 419</p> <p>Other comediennes 419</p> <p>Enter Stage Left: Serious Actors 421</p> <p>Sidney Poitier 421</p> <p>Cicely Tyson 422</p> <p>Denzel Washington 422</p> <p>Morgan Freeman 423</p> <p>Wesley Snipes 423</p> <p>Samuel L. Jackson 424</p> <p>Halle Berry 424</p> <p>Viola Davis 425</p> <p>And the Award Goes to? 426</p> <p><b>Chapter 18: Black Hollywood: TV</b> <b>427</b></p> <p>Early Black TV Comedies 428</p> <p>Opening the doors wider 428</p> <p>Getting an edge 429</p> <p>Kid comedies 429</p> <p>Cue the Huxtables and A Different World 430</p> <p>Targeting the Black Hip-Hop Audience 432</p> <p>Cable TV Opens the Door to More 432</p> <p>Black Women Comedians Contribute on TV 434</p> <p>No More Drama with Dramas 435</p> <p>The Rhimes effect 435</p> <p>Made-for-TV movies 436</p> <p>Black actors in cable TV series 437</p> <p>Network dramas 440</p> <p>Highlighting Black LGBTQ stories 440</p> <p>Black women TV executives 442</p> <p>The Next Level: Building Black Television and Film Empires 443</p> <p>The billion-dollar BET 443</p> <p>The big "O" 444</p> <p>Tyler Perry builds his own table 445</p> <p><b>Chapter 19: Winning Ain’t Easy: Race and Sports</b> <b>449</b></p> <p>Baseball 449</p> <p>The Negro Leagues 450</p> <p>Jackie Robinson: Integrating baseball 454</p> <p>The modern era 455</p> <p>Basketball 456</p> <p>College ball 457</p> <p>Pro ball 458</p> <p>Women’s basketball 462</p> <p>Boxing 464</p> <p>Football 467</p> <p>Pro football 467</p> <p>College football 469</p> <p>Track and Field 470</p> <p>Tennis 474</p> <p>Arthur Ashe 474</p> <p>Venus and Serena Williams 475</p> <p>Golf 475</p> <p>Other Sports 476</p> <p><b>Part 6: The Part of Tens</b> <b>479</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 20: Ten Black American Firsts </b><b>481</b></p> <p>Medicine (1837) 481</p> <p>Law (1845) 482</p> <p>Kentucky Derby (1875) 482</p> <p>Congressional Medal of Honor (1900) 483</p> <p>Rhodes Scholar (1907) 483</p> <p>Exploration (1909) 483</p> <p>Television (1939) 484</p> <p>Nobel Peace Prize (1950) 484</p> <p>Pulitzer Prize (1950) 484</p> <p>Fashion (1988) 485</p> <p><b>Chapter 21: Ten Black Literary Classics</b> <b>487</b></p> <p>Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Written by Himself (1845) 488</p> <p>Up from Slavery: An Autobiography by Booker T. Washington (1901) 488</p> <p>The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois (1903) 489</p> <p>The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson (1933) 489</p> <p>Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (1937) 490</p> <p>Native Son by Richard Wright (1940) 490</p> <p>Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (1952) 491</p> <p>The Autobiography of Malcolm X (As Told to Alex Haley)</p> <p>by Alex Haley and Malcolm X (1965) 491</p> <p>The Color Purple by Alice Walker (1982) 492</p> <p>Beloved by Toni Morrison (1987) 492</p> <p><b>Chapter 22: Ten (Plus One) Influential Black American Visual Artists </b><b>493</b></p> <p>Joshua Johnson (c. 1763–1832) 494</p> <p>Edmonia Lewis (c. 1844–1907) 494</p> <p>Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937) 495</p> <p>Aaron Douglas (1899–1979) 495</p> <p>Horace Pippin (1888–1946) 496</p> <p>Loïs Mailou Jones (1905–1998) 497</p> <p>Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000) 498</p> <p>Romare Bearden (1911–1988) 498</p> <p>John Biggers (1924–2001) 499</p> <p>Samella Lewis, Ph.D. (1924–) 499</p> <p>Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988) 500</p> <p>Index 501</p>
<p><b>Ronda Racha Penrice</b> attended the M.A. program in Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. A veteran freelance writer, the Columbia University alum has covered Black history and culture for publications including <i>Zora, Essence</i>, the <i>Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Ebony, theGrio, The Root</i>, and <i>NBC THINK</i>.</p>
<p><b>Tap into Black American history and culture</b></p><p>The historical and cultural contributions of Black Americans run deep. And what you learned (or more likely didn’t learn) in school wasn’t the whole story! With roots in the African continent meshed into something completely new, Black Americans have forged a culture of excellence in various spheres including education, music, politics, film, TV, theatre, and beyond. Explore how their resilience through slavery and Jim Crow fuels the ongoing fight against systemic racism and social injustice. From the emancipation and civil rights movements to Black Lives Matter of today, the flame of freedom burns strong. Uncover all this and much, much more in <i>Black American History For Dummies</i>!</p><p><b>Inside. . .</b></p><ul><b><li>Black heritage and pride</li><li>Transatlantic slave trade</li><li>Black women leaders</li><li>Civil War and Reconstruction</li><li>Civil Rights and Black Power</li><li>Fighting racism and injustice</li><li>Black culture, sports, and religion</li><li>Excellence in literature and art</li></b></ul>

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