Details

The Architect's Studio Companion


The Architect's Studio Companion

Rules of Thumb for Preliminary Design
7. Aufl.

von: Joseph Iano, Edward Allen

79,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 27.05.2022
ISBN/EAN: 9781119826828
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 512

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

<b>THE ARCHITECT’S STUDIO COMPANION</b> <p><b>The latest edition of the guidebook every architect needs at their fingertips, updated and expanded throughout</b> <p>Start your designs on solid ground with <i>The Architect’s Studio Companion! </i>This comprehensive handbook provides everything you need for the preliminary selecting, configuring, and sizing of the structural, environmental, safety, accessibility, and parking systems of a building. Edward Allen and Joseph Iano, authors of the market-leading <i>Fundamentals of Building Construction, </i>use their trademark talent for boiling down complex technical requirements into easy-to-use, time-saving guidelines for the engineering and architectural design of buildings. <p>The new seventh edition is updated with new building codes, new information on heating and cooling systems for buildings, new structural systems, new requirements for tall mass timber buildings, and more. Throughout the text, straightforward diagrams and user-friendly explanations help you lay out the most important systems of a building in a matter of minutes without stressing about complicated technical concepts. Use this guide to introduce building systems into the early stages of design, and greatly reduce the need for later revisions or redesign???and keep your projects on time and on budget. <p>Streamline your design process today with <i>The Architect’s Studio Companion:</i> <ul><li> Explore alternative structural systems quickly and efficiently</li> <li> Compare the carbon impacts of alternative system choices… at a glance</li> <li> Stay current with the latest information about tall mass timber buildings</li> <li> Access information on high-performance heating and cooling systems, passive design, natural daylighting, and other sustainable design strategies with ease</li> <li>Incorporate U.S. and Canadian building code requirements and accessibility regulations into your designs</li></ul> <p>More than just a reference, <i>The Architect’s Studio Companion, Seventh Edition</i> is a must-have companion that no practicing architect or student should be without.
<p>ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ix</p> <p>HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xi</p> <p>SECTION 1</p> <p>DESIGNING WITH BUILDING</p> <p>CODES 1</p> <p>1. DESIGNING WITH BUILDING CODES 3</p> <p>SECTION 2</p> <p>DESIGNING THE STRUCTURE 19</p> <p>1. SELECTING THE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM 21</p> <p>2. CONFIGURING THE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM 39</p> <p>3. SIZING THE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM 55</p> <p>SECTION 3</p> <p>DESIGNING WITH DAYLIGHT 139</p> <p>1. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DAYLIGHTING SYSTEMS 141</p> <p>2. CONFIGURING AND SIZING DAYLIGHTING</p> <p>SYSTEMS 151</p> <p>SECTION 4</p> <p>DESIGNING SPACES FOR</p> <p>MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL</p> <p>SERVICES 159</p> <p>1. SELECTING HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS FOR</p> <p>LARGE BUILDINGS 161</p> <p>2. CONFIGURING AND SIZING MECHANICAL AND</p> <p>ELECTRICAL SERVICES FOR LARGE BUILDINGS 185</p> <p>3. PASSIVE HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS 221</p> <p>4. MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS FOR SMALL</p> <p>BUILDINGS 239</p> <p>SECTION 5</p> <p>DESIGNING FOR EGRESS</p> <p>AND ACCESSIBILITY 265</p> <p>1. CONFIGURING THE EGRESS SYSTEM AND PROVIDING</p> <p>ACCESSIBLE ROUTES 267</p> <p>2. SIZING THE EGRESS SYSTEM 301</p> <p>3. STAIRWAY AND RAMP DESIGN 317</p> <p>SECTION 6</p> <p>DESIGNING FOR PARKING 333</p> <p>1. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR PARKING FACILITIES 335</p> <p>2. CONFIGURING PARKING FACILITIES 343</p> <p>3. SIZING PARKING FACILITIES 355</p> <p>SECTION 7</p> <p>DESIGNING WITH HEIGHT</p> <p>AND AREA LIMITATIONS 369</p> <p>1. CONSTRUCTION TYPES AND HEIGHT AND AREA</p> <p>LIMITATIONS 371</p> <p>2. HEIGHT AND AREA TABLES 393</p> <p>APPENDIX A</p> <p>EXAMPLE USE OF THIS BOOK 481</p> <p>APPENDIX B</p> <p>UNITS OF CONVERSION 487</p> <p>BIBLIOGRAPHY 489</p> <p>INDEX 491</p>
I find the previous edition to be valuable in my design studio teaching. In this context, it is most useful as a quick reference for students to understand dimensional requirements for structural members and egress components, and to understand the differences among various HVAC systems. Its major strengths are (1) the structural tables for columns, beams and slabs of various materials--in my teaching, this is the most-used part of the book; (2) the code summaries including egress issues (egress paths, stairs, maximum travel distance, etc.), and (3) the diagrams and descriptions of different HVAC systems. However, some students have found difficulty navigating the code-related topics in the book. I don't have a good solution to this, but perhaps defining a workflow or thought process to follow would help: what type of building is it? > what is the floor area? > how many exits are needed? > how far apart do the exits need to be? > what is the minimum required width? > etc. I would appreciate more information about structural rules-of-thumb relating to cantilevers, deep trusses (story-high trusses), and lateral bracing. The inclusion of mass timber structures in the latest edition has been useful. Any new or more specific information related to timber would be appreciated. Yes, I do agree that information on embodied carbon impacts would be useful. I am not sure which variables affect this impact, but a table or a formula that can be used to compare the embodied carbon of different materials would be useful. I thin comparison is the key, and this information can then become one of the criteria used in selecting a structural material. -Scott Murray, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign I have used, and still do use, this text specific to my Structural Design Courses. Within the text, I focus on the first part dedicated to structural systems. I appreciated the addition of CLT in the sixth edition, as my students have had burgeoning interests in the material. Beyond that (and updated code), I have not noticed significant changes from the previous edition. This book remains an excellent guide for my students, especially in integrating realistic member sizes into their structural schemes in studio. The three major strengths of the text are: 1. Ease and accessibility of the text. Once I introduce how to use the text, students have an easy time in referencing it as they need it for their studio projects. 2. Depth of information provided both in the chapters that precede the member sizing charts and the chapter that includes the sizing charts. I often lean on the material discussion of lateral loads in Chapter 2 to supplement the information from the other texts used in my courses. 3. Integration of building system information within one source. Though I don't spend a lot of time in class discussing other portions of the text, I do point out to students how comprehensive the text is and that they should know that beyond the three chapters that we focus on is a wealth of information for how other systems becomes integrated into a building, along with the structural system. The fact that this text also fully imbeds code is a significant reason why I require it. It does this (integrating code) in a very seamless fashion. I use this text for exactly what I need it for, and thus do not find it has any major weaknesses. I have wondered if additional material would be appropriate to include. For instance, would it be worthwhile to include in Chapter 2, an overview about how to approach other types of structural systems not delineated in the charts in Chapter 3 (e.g., space frames, vaults, domes, cable systems, etc.)? Also, would it be worthwhile to include at least a brief consideration in Chapter 1 or 2 about emerging technologies and where to look for information about emerging technologies/material advancements regarding structures? (In my mind, this sets up a teaser/pre-cursor to what the next edition might Proposal Summary Sheet include.) I would really appreciate if the text included dead load charts, even if they were in general range categories like the live load ones (p. 32-33). Otherwise, the most significant additions to new editions relates to updates in code. After that, it would be significant updates in structural materials (e.g., the addition of charts for CLT in the sixth edition). Many of my students are looking for sustainability gauges on structural materials and tend to cite the manufacturers of the products as opposed to an independent, non-partisan source. I could see this information being presented similar to those in Chapter 1, pages 24-29 (a criteria chart for sustainable initiatives based on different parameters). -Jennifer Barker, University of Memphis
<p><b>Joseph Iano</b> is an author, illustrator, and practicing architect who has taught design and technology in schools of architecture throughout the United States. He has collaborated on numerous publications over a span of more than 30 years. Currently, he runs a Seattle firm that provides technical, quality management, and communications consulting to the design and construction industry.</p> <p><b>Edward Allen, FAIA </b>(1938???2020) taught more than 35 years as a faculty member of Yale University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other North American schools of Architecture and Design. Over the course of a professional career spanning five decades, he influenced a generation of architectural educators, designed more than 50 constructed buildings, and was the best-selling coauthor of <i>Fundamentals of Building Construction, Form and Forces, Architectural Detailing, Fundamentals of Residential Construction,</i> and many other architectural works in print.
<p><b>The latest edition of the guidebook every architect needs at their fingertips, updated and expanded throughout</b></p> <p>Start your designs on solid ground with <i>The Architect’s Studio Companion! </i>This comprehensive handbook provides everything you need for the preliminary selecting, configuring, and sizing of the structural, environmental, safety, accessibility, and parking systems of a building. Edward Allen and Joseph Iano, authors of the market-leading <i>Fundamentals of Building Construction, </i>use their trademark talent for boiling down complex technical requirements into easy-to-use, time-saving guidelines for the engineering and architectural design of buildings. <p>The new seventh edition is updated with new building codes, new information on heating and cooling systems for buildings, new structural systems, new requirements for tall mass timber buildings, and more. Throughout the text, straightforward diagrams and user-friendly explanations help you lay out the most important systems of a building in a matter of minutes without stressing about complicated technical concepts. Use this guide to introduce building systems into the early stages of design, and greatly reduce the need for later revisions or redesign???and keep your projects on time and on budget. <p>Streamline your design process today with <i>The Architect’s Studio Companion:</i> <ul><li> Explore alternative structural systems quickly and efficiently</li> <li> Compare the carbon impacts of alternative system choices… at a glance</li> <li> Stay current with the latest information about tall mass timber buildings</li> <li> Access information on high-performance heating and cooling systems, passive design, natural daylighting, and other sustainable design strategies with ease</li> <li>Incorporate U.S. and Canadian building code requirements and accessibility regulations into your designs</li></ul> <p>More than just a reference, <i>The Architect’s Studio Companion, Seventh Edition</i> is a must-have companion that no practicing architect or student should be without.

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