Details

Systemic Innovation


Systemic Innovation

Entrepreneurial Strategies and Market Dynamics
1. Aufl.

von: Dimitri Uzunidis

126,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 15.10.2020
ISBN/EAN: 9781119779377
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 288

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Beschreibungen

<p><b>General Introduction: Systemic Innovations and Transformation of Organizational Models </b><b>xi<br /></b><i>Dimitri UZUNIDIS</i></p> <p><b>Chapter 1. Enterprise Through the Lens of Agility, Creativity and Monitoring Method Combinations </b><b>1<br /></b><i>Stéphane GORIA</i></p> <p>1.1. Introduction 1</p> <p>1.2. Agility and its manifesto 2</p> <p>1.3. Agility and the design process 4</p> <p>1.4. Agility and creativity 7</p> <p>1.5. Agility and decision-making 9</p> <p>1.6. Innovation-oriented agile monitoring 12</p> <p>1.7. Conclusion 14</p> <p>1.8. References 15</p> <p><b>Chapter 2. Science Fiction: A Strategic Approach for Innovative Organizations </b><b>19<br /></b><i>Thomas MICHAUD</i></p> <p>2.1. Introduction 19</p> <p>2.2. Science fiction, a futuristic fantasy for engineers and innovators 21</p> <p>2.2.1. The scientific imagination behind major discoveries 21</p> <p>2.2.2. Examples: virtual reality and the conquest of Mars 22</p> <p>2.3. Science fiction and creativity: new approaches 25</p> <p>2.3.1. Design fiction, a method for stimulating creativity 25</p> <p>2.3.2. Science fiction prototyping 27</p> <p>2.4. Towards a theory of technotypes 27</p> <p>2.4.1. Utopian technologies and the technological utopianism of American culture 28</p> <p>2.4.2. Technotypes, structures of the technical imaginary 31</p> <p>2.5. Conclusion 33</p> <p>2.6. References 34</p> <p><b>Chapter 3. The Management of Inventive Knowledge: From Inventive Intellectual Corpus to Innovation </b><b>37<br /></b><i>Pierre SAULAIS and Jean-Louis ERMINE</i></p> <p>3.1. Introduction 37</p> <p>3.2. From knowledge capital to knowledge management 38</p> <p>3.3. Knowledge-based knowledge management 40</p> <p>3.4. The knowledge capital and the inventive intellectual corpus 42</p> <p>3.4.1. Knowledge capital 42</p> <p>3.4.2. The inventive intellectual corpus and the dematerialized knowledge object 43</p> <p>3.4.3. The inventive intellectual corpus at the heart of innovation 43</p> <p>3.5. The virtuous cycle of knowledge management 45</p> <p>3.6. The MASK method 46</p> <p>3.6.1. MASK II: Analysis of knowledge capital 47</p> <p>3.6.2. MASK I: Capitalization of knowledge capital 48</p> <p>3.6.3. MASK III: Sharing the knowledge capital 48</p> <p>3.6.4. MASK IV: Evolution of the knowledge capital 49</p> <p>3.7. Illustrations with real cases from “economic reality” 50</p> <p>3.7.1. Strategic analysis and capitalization: the case of IRSN 50</p> <p>3.7.2. Transfer: the case of Sonatrach 53</p> <p>3.7.3. Innovation: the case of ONERA 58</p> <p>3.8. Conclusion 62</p> <p>3.9. References 63</p> <p><b>Chapter 4. Evolution of Firms Trajectories and Innovation: Knowledge Capital and Financial Opportunities </b><b>67<br /></b><i>Blandine LAPERCHE</i></p> <p>4.1. Introduction 67</p> <p>4.2. Technological and firms trajectories 68</p> <p>4.2.1. Technological paradigms and trajectories: first definitions 68</p> <p>4.2.2. Paradigms, regimes and trajectories: empirical studies 69</p> <p>4.2.3. The firm’s trajectory or evolutionary path 71</p> <p>4.3. The formation of trajectories: knowledge capital and financial opportunities 73</p> <p>4.3.1. Dynamic capabilities and knowledge capital 73</p> <p>4.3.2. The collective dimension of trajectories and its consequences 75</p> <p>4.3.3. Financial opportunities, firm evolution and technical change 77</p> <p>4.4. Conclusion 79</p> <p>4.5. References 79</p> <p><b>Chapter 5. From Shared Inventions to Competitive Innovations: Networks and Enterprise Automation Strategies </b><b>85<br /></b><i>Michel VIGEZZI and Dimitri UZUNIDIS</i></p> <p>5.1. Introduction 85</p> <p>5.2. Applications of recent concepts in automation: social dynamics, shared inventions and competitive innovations 87</p> <p>5.2.1. Shared inventions… 87</p> <p>5.2.2. Competitive innovations 90</p> <p>5.2.3. Social dynamics 93</p> <p>5.2.4. What coherences are there between shared inventions and competitive innovations? 94</p> <p>5.3. “Phase 1” automation: machine inventions, networks of inventors and jobs 94</p> <p>5.3.1. The discoveries of these shared inventions 95</p> <p>5.3.2. Networks and shared inventions 96</p> <p>5.4. Phase 2 automation: innovations and sets of machines, networks and work dimensions 100</p> <p>5.4.1. Automation and changes in work 100</p> <p>5.5. Conclusion 105</p> <p>5.6. References 106</p> <p><b>Chapter 6. Technologies and Inter-industrial Collaborations: A Patent Analysis </b><b>111<br /></b><i>Didier LEBERT and François-Xavier MEUNIER</i></p> <p>6.1. Introduction 111</p> <p>6.2. Method: the co-patent multigraph 112</p> <p>6.3. Data and descriptive statistics 116</p> <p>6.4. A structural look at R&D cooperation: results and discussion 124</p> <p>6.5. Conclusion 133</p> <p>6.6. Appendix 135</p> <p>6.7. References 141</p> <p><b>Chapter 7. Technological Change and Environmental Transition: Lessons from the Case of the Automobile </b><b>143<br /></b><i>Smaïl AÏT-EL-HADJ</i></p> <p>7.1. Introduction 143</p> <p>7.2. Encountering a major technological limit: the environmental limitation 144</p> <p>7.2.1. Technological system dynamics 144</p> <p>7.2.2. Nature and forms of the environmental limit 145</p> <p>7.3. The irruption of the environmental limit as a determining/dominant factor in technological change: the case of automotive system technology 146</p> <p>7.3.1. The environmental limit of the automotive system 147</p> <p>7.3.2. Corrective action of a social, fiscal and regulatory nature 149</p> <p>7.3.3. Forms and stages of technological change in road transport 153</p> <p>7.4. The environmental limit as a factor of a major technological change 157</p> <p>7.4.1. Nature and actions of environmental limits 157</p> <p>7.4.2. Generation of a new change regime 158</p> <p>7.5. Conclusion 160</p> <p>7.6. References 161</p> <p><b>Chapter 8. The Transformation of Defense Innovation Systems: Knowledge Bases, Disruptive Technologies and Operational Capabilities </b><b>163<br /></b><i>Pierre BARBAROUX</i></p> <p>8.1. Introduction 163</p> <p>8.2. The evolution of knowledge bases: duality and complexity 165</p> <p>8.2.1. Dual-use technology 165</p> <p>8.2.2. Knowledge complexity and scientific intensity 168</p> <p>8.3. The disruptive impact of technology: artificial intelligence and autonomous systems 169</p> <p>8.3.1. AI: definitions and sources of legitimacy 170</p> <p>8.4. The transformation of military capabilities: network-centric warfare and multi-domain C2 174</p> <p>8.4.1. First step: network-centric warfare (NCW) 174</p> <p>8.4.2. Second step: multi-domain command and control (MDC2) 176</p> <p>8.5. Conclusion 178</p> <p>8.6. References 178</p> <p><b>Chapter 9. Nanotechnologies and Business Intelligence: Challenges of Information Valorization and Knowledge Creation </b><b>183<br /></b><i>Jean-Louis MONINO</i></p> <p>9.1. Introduction 183</p> <p>9.2. Overview of nanotechnology and its economic and technical potential. 184</p> <p>9.2.1. Understanding nanotechnology 185</p> <p>9.2.2. The challenges of nanotechnology 188</p> <p>9.2.3. The limits of nanotechnology 190</p> <p>9.3. Business intelligence 192</p> <p>9.3.1. History and definition of business intelligence 192</p> <p>9.3.2. Information at the heart of business intelligence 193</p> <p>9.4. Business intelligence and nanotechnology 195</p> <p>9.4.1. Examples: quantum computers, RFID chips 196</p> <p>9.4.2. Nanotechnology in industry 197</p> <p>9.4.3. What are the limits and stakes? 199</p> <p>9.5. Conclusion 200</p> <p>9.6. References 201</p> <p><b>Chapter 10. When Innovation Innovates: How Artificial Intelligence Challenges the Patent System </b><b>205<br /></b><i>Marc BAUDRY and Beatrice DUMONT</i></p> <p>10.1. Introduction 205</p> <p>10.2. Definitions and evolution over time of AI technologies 207</p> <p>10.3. The difficult issue of the patentability of AI 209</p> <p>10.3.1. The patent subject-matter eligibility of AI technologies 209</p> <p>10.3.2. Who should be listed as the inventor? 213</p> <p>10.3.3. Liability for patent infringement by AI 215</p> <p>10.4. AI patents in light of economic theory 216</p> <p>10.4.1. The rationale for granting patents 216</p> <p>10.4.2. AI patents, incremental inventions and legal implications 218</p> <p>10.5. Conclusion 220</p> <p>10.6. References 221</p> <p><b>Chapter 11. Conflicting Standards and Innovation in Energy Transition </b><b>223<br /></b><i>Stéphane CALLENS</i></p> <p>11.1. Introduction: a change of culture 223</p> <p>11.2. Green innovations and standardization 225</p> <p>11.2.1. Regulatory quality defined on the basis of a relationship between standards and innovation 228</p> <p>11.2.2. Another multi-level management: sovereignty and innovation 230</p> <p>11.3. The conflict of standards: globalization, sovereignty and democracy 232</p> <p>11.3.1. Acting solely through taxation? 232</p> <p>11.3.2. Acting solely through local and regional authorities? 234</p> <p>11.3.3. The conflict of standards: Europe and the United States 235</p> <p>11.4. The energy transition: a natural experiment 240</p> <p>11.5. Conclusion 241</p> <p>11.6. References 242</p> <p>List of Authors 245</p> <p>Index 247</p>

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