Details

Remote Detection and Maritime Pollution


Remote Detection and Maritime Pollution

Chemical Spill Studies
1. Aufl.

von: Stephane Le Floch, Frederic Muttin

126,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 01.12.2020
ISBN/EAN: 9781119805519
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 208

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Beschreibungen

<p>The detection of marine pollution requires a scientific and operational response to identify contaminants, chemicals and hydrocarbons, and to support contrasting observations. Remote Detection and Maritime Pollution originates from the proceedings of CEDRE Information Day, held on October 13, 2016 in Brest, France. Containing four parts encompassing 13 chapters, this book explores remote detection channels for the multiform marine pollutions of today and of the future. With a focus on transatlantic cooperation, it covers remote detection sensors, the state of the art of maritime surveillance with regard to the interests of national and international authorities, the benefits of response strategy, and geophysical exploration. Future vectors (airplanes, drones, satellites, among others) and sensors (radar, optical, hyperspectral and so on) are also studied. This book is a valuable resource for practical solutions for marine authorities, industries (chemical, energy, aerospace, petroleum, shipping), lawyers and scientists.</p>
<p>Forewords xi</p> <p><b>Part 1. Remote Sensing Means </b><b>1</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 1. POLLUPROOF Project </b><b>3<br /></b><i>Sophie CHATAING, Sébastien ANGELLIAUME, Pierre-Yves FOUCHER, Eldon PUCKRIN and Stéphane LE FLOCH</i></p> <p>1.1. Introduction 3</p> <p>1.2. POLLUPROOF project 4</p> <p>1.2.1. Objectives 4</p> <p>1.2.2. Hazardous and noxious substances 5</p> <p>1.3. Experimental approach 7</p> <p>1.3.1. Calibration of optical sensors 7</p> <p>1.3.2. Evaluation of radar, optical and hyperspectral sensors at sea 9</p> <p>1.4. Conclusion 14</p> <p>1.5. References 14</p> <p><b>Chapter 2. Multifrequency Radar Imagery and Characterization of Hazardous and Noxious Substances at Sea </b><b>17<br /></b><i>Sébastien ANGELLIAUME, Brent MINCHEW, Sophie CHATAING, Philippe MARTINEAU and Véronique MIEGEBIELLE</i></p> <p>2.1. Introduction 17</p> <p>2.2. Experimentation at sea 19</p> <p>2.2.1. Radar imagery 19</p> <p>2.2.2. Chemical products 20</p> <p>2.2.3. Planning of measurements 22</p> <p>2.3. Methodology 24</p> <p>2.3.1. Scattering from ocean surface 24</p> <p>2.3.2. Detection and relative quantification 26</p> <p>2.3.3. Oil/water mixing index 27</p> <p>2.4. Results and discussion 29</p> <p>2.4.1. Observation of hazardous and noxious substances at sea 29</p> <p>2.4.2. Detection and quantification of impact on the ocean surface 31</p> <p>2.4.3. Characterization 34</p> <p>2.5. Conclusion 36</p> <p>2.6. Acknowledgments 37</p> <p>2.7. References 37</p> <p><b>Chapter 3. Remote Sensing of HNS using Longwave Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging</b><b> 41<br /></b><i>Eldon PUCKRIN, Dennis DURO, Guillaume GAGNE, Anne-Pier BERNIER, Louis ARMSTRONG </i><i>and Sophie CHATAING</i></p> <p>3.1. Introduction 41</p> <p>3.2. LWIR hyperspectral remote sensing capability 42</p> <p>3.2.1. Basin measurements at CEDRE 43</p> <p>3.2.2. Sea measurements 44</p> <p>3.3. Detection and identification of HNS using LWIR hyperspectral sensing 46</p> <p>3.3.1. Detection phenomenology 46</p> <p>3.3.2. Detection algorithm 48</p> <p>3.3.3. Basin measurements at CEDRE 48</p> <p>3.3.4. Sea measurements 51</p> <p>3.4. Conclusion 53</p> <p>3.5. References 53</p> <p><b>Part 2. Remote Sensing to Support Marine Surveillance Services </b><b>55</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 4. Customs Expertise in Remote Sensing </b><b>57<br /></b><i>Laurent BUIGNET</i></p> <p>4.1. Introduction 57</p> <p>4.2. The aircraft 57</p> <p>4.3. The equipment 59</p> <p>4.4. Airborne remote sensing processing 60</p> <p>4.5. Side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) processing 60</p> <p>4.6. Infrared and ultraviolet line scanner 61</p> <p>4.7. Standard detection and investigation 61</p> <p>4.8. The future, a new multi-mission aircraft 62</p> <p><b>Chapter 5. Remote Sensing as Evidence in Court </b><b>63<br /></b><i>Yann RABUTEAU</i></p> <p>5.1. Introduction 63</p> <p>5.2. Legal framework of the offence and the evidence 65</p> <p>5.2.1. What the texts say 65</p> <p>5.2.2. What legal precedents have been set? 67</p> <p>5.3. Remote sensing: questions and advances 68</p> <p>5.3.1. Does the verdict of the <i>Traquair </i>case exclude recourse to remote sensing? 68</p> <p>5.3.2. What answers and advances have been observed? 68</p> <p>5.4. Conclusion 69</p> <p>5.5. References 70</p> <p><b>Chapter 6. Long-Term Surveillance and Monitoring of Natural Events in Coastal Waters </b><b>71<br /></b><i>Francis GOHIN</i></p> <p>6.1. Introduction 71</p> <p>6.2. Satellite products for long-term surveillance 72</p> <p>6.3. Some specific events of natural origin in coastal waters 74</p> <p>6.4. Conclusion 76</p> <p>6.5. References 76</p> <p><b>Part 3. Remote Sensing to Support the Response Strategy </b><b>77</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 7. VIGISAT Ground Receiving Station and EMSA CleanSeaNet Services </b><b>79<br /></b><i>Guillaume HAJDUCH</i></p> <p>7.1. Introduction 79</p> <p>7.2. VIGISAT ground receiving station and detection of pollution in near-real time 80</p> <p>7.3. Polluter identification with AIS data flows and drift modeling 83</p> <p>7.4. References 86</p> <p><b>Chapter 8. System-to-system Interface Between the EMSA CleanSeaNet Service and OSERIT </b><b>87<br /></b><i>Sébastien LEGRAND and Ronny SCHALLIER</i></p> <p>8.1. Introduction 87</p> <p>8.2. The EMSA CleanSeaNet service 91</p> <p>8.3. OSERIT 94</p> <p>8.3.1. The OSERIT Oil Spill Model 94</p> <p>8.3.2. OSERIT visualization tool 96</p> <p>8.3.3. OSERIT domain 98</p> <p>8.3.4. OSERIT met-ocean forcing 98</p> <p>8.3.5. OSERIT oil database 99</p> <p>8.4. A system-to-system interface between CleanSeaNet and OSERIT 101</p> <p>8.4.1. Scenario 1: automatically triggered forecast 102</p> <p>8.4.2. Scenario 2: automatically triggered backtrack 103</p> <p>8.4.3. Scenario 3: manually triggered forecast 103</p> <p>8.4.4. Scenario 4: manually triggered backtrack 104</p> <p>8.5. The <i>Flinterstar </i>incident 105</p> <p>8.5.1. The incident 105</p> <p>8.5.2. Monitoring and surveillance of the oil and its fate/behavior 107</p> <p>8.6. Conclusion 112</p> <p>8.7. Acknowledgments 112</p> <p>8.8. References 113</p> <p><b>Chapter 9. Optimizing the Use of Aerial Surveillance Assets in Oil Spill Response Operations </b><b>115<br /></b><i>Charles Henri THOUAILLE</i></p> <p>9.1. Introduction 115</p> <p>9.2. Assumptions and working hypotheses 117</p> <p>9.3. Experimental protocol: testing the primary hypothesis 118</p> <p>9.3.1. Technical specifications 118</p> <p>9.3.2. Operational requirements 119</p> <p>9.3.3. Choice of SUAS 120</p> <p>9.3.4. Systematic testing of assumptions 121</p> <p>9.4. Experimental protocol: underlying assumptions and testing of secondary hypothesis 125</p> <p>9.5. The case for using SUAS as a force multiplier in spill response coordination 128</p> <p>9.6. Appendix 1 130</p> <p>9.7. Appendix 2 131</p> <p>9.8. References 132</p> <p><b>Part 4. Remote Sensing for Exploration </b><b>133</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 10. Potential of Imaging UAVs for Coastal Monitoring </b><b>135<br /></b><i>Marion JAUD, Christophe DELACOURT, Nicolas LE DANTEC, Jérôme AMMANN, Philippe GRANDJEAN, Pascal ALLEMAND and Lucie COCQUEMPOT</i></p> <p>10.1. Introduction 135</p> <p>10.2. Constraints on the survey 136</p> <p>10.3. Examples of UAV platforms 137</p> <p>10.4. Survey protocol 138</p> <p>10.5. Data processing 139</p> <p>10.6. Examples of applications 140</p> <p>10.7. Conclusion 142</p> <p>10.8. References 142</p> <p><b>Chapter 11. Use of Remote Sensing Techniques to Survey, Detect and Interpret Hydrocarbon Seeps and Spills for Exploration and Environment </b><b>143<br /></b><i>Véronique MIEGEBIELLE</i></p> <p>11.1. Introduction 143</p> <p>11.2. Methodology 144</p> <p>11.3. Offshore facilities monitoring/mining field 145</p> <p>11.4. Emergency 146</p> <p>11.5. Perspectives 148</p> <p>11.6. Conclusion 148</p> <p>11.7. References 149</p> <p><b>Chapter 12. Natural Escapes of Oil in Sedimentary Basins: Space-borne Recognition and Pairing with Seafloor and Sub-seafloor Features </b><b>151<br /></b><i>Romain JATIAULT</i></p> <p>12.1. Introduction 151</p> <p>12.2. Datasets and methods 153</p> <p>12.2.1. Data 153</p> <p>12.2.2. Methods 155</p> <p>12.3. Results 158</p> <p>12.3.1. Oil slick mapping 158</p> <p>12.3.2. Oil migration pathways and horizontal deflection 159</p> <p>12.4. Conclusion 162</p> <p>12.5. References 162</p> <p><b>Conclusion </b><b>167<br /></b><i>Stéphane LE FLOCH and Frédéric MUTTIN</i></p> <p>List of Authors 177</p> <p>Index 181</p>
<p><b>Stéphane Le Floch</b> is a chemist and manager of the CEDRE Research Department in Brest, France. He is involved in the working groups MAR-ICE and GESAMP on hazardous and noxious substances for the European Maritime Safety Agency and the International Maritime Organization.</p> <p><b>Frédéric Muttin</b> is a Professor of Applied Mathematics in Marine Sciences at the engineering school EIGSI in La Rochelle, France. His research focuses on numerical modeling and statistical analyses. He also conducts full-scale experiments on chronic and accidental marine pollution.</p>
Stéphane Le Floch is a chemist and manager of the CEDRE Research Department in Brest, France. He is involved in the working groups MAR-ICE and GESAMP on hazardous and noxious substances for the European Maritime Safety Agency and the International Maritime Organization. <br /><br />Frédéric Muttin is a Professor of Applied Mathematics in Marine Sciences at the engineering school EIGSI in La Rochelle, France. His research focuses on numerical modeling and statistical analyses. He also conducts full-scale experiments on chronic and accidental marine pollution.

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