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Project Management Best Practices: Achieving Global Excellence


Project Management Best Practices: Achieving Global Excellence


4. Aufl.

von: Harold Kerzner

76,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 07.02.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9781119470700
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 784

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

The comprehensive guide to project management implementation, updated with the latest in the field Project management has spread beyond the IT world to become a critical part of business in every sphere; built on efficiency, analysis, and codified practice, professional project management leads to the sort of reproducible results and reliable processes that make a business successful. Project Management Best Practices provides implementation guidance for every phase of a project, based on the real-world methodologies from leading companies around the globe. Updated to align with the industry’s latest best practices, this new Fourth Edition includes new discussion on Agile and Scrum, tradeoffs and constraints, Portfolio PMO   tools, and much more. Get up-to-date information on the latest best practices that add value at every level of an organization Gain insight from more than 50 project managers at world-class organizations including Airbus, Heineken, RTA, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Sony, Cisco, Nokia, and more Delve deeper into implementation guidance for Agile, Scrum, and Six Sigma Explore more efficient methodologies, training, measurement, and metrics that boost organization-wide performance Adopt new approaches to culture and behavioral excellence, including conflict resolution, situational leadership, proactive management, staffing, and more Ideal for both college and corporate training, this book is accompanied by an Instructor’s Manual and PowerPoint lecture slides that bring project management concepts right into the classroom. As the field continues to grow and evolve, it becomes increasingly important to stay current with new and established practices; this book provides comprehensive guidance on every aspect of project management, with invaluable real-world insight from leaders in the field.
Preface xiii 1 UNDERSTANDING BEST PRACTICES 1 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 WÄRTSILÄ 2 1.2 Project Management Best Practices: 1945–1960 3 1.3 Project Management Best Practices: 1960–1985 5 1.4 Project Management Best Practices: 1985–2016 8 1.5 Project Management Best Practices: 2016–Present 13 1.6 Benefits Management Practice at Dubai Customs 14 1.7 An Executive’s View of Project Management 18 1.8 Best Practices Process 21 1.9 Step 1: Definition of a Best Practice 23 1.10 Step 2: Seeking Out Best Practices 25 1.11 Dashboards and Scorecards 35 1.12 Key Performance Indicators 39 1.13 Step 3: Validating the Best Practice 43 1.14 Step 4: Levels of Best Practices 45 1.15 Step 5: Management of Best Practices 47 1.16 Step 6: Revalidating Best Practices 48 1.17 Step 7: What to Do with a Best Practice 48 1.18 Step 8: Communicating Best Practices across the Company 49 1.19 Step 9: Ensuring Usage of the Best Practices 51 1.20 Common Beliefs 51 1.21 Best Practices Library 53 1.22 Hewlett-Packard: Best Practices in Action 55 2 FROM BEST PRACTICE TO MIGRAINE HEADACHE 59 2.0 Introduction 59 2.1 Good Intentions Becoming Migraines 60 2.2 Enterprise Project Management Methodology Migraine 61 2.3 Trade-off Migraine 61 2.4 Customer Satisfaction Migraine 64 2.5 Migraine Resulting from Responding to Changing Customer Requirements 65 2.6 Reporting Level of the PMO Migraine 65 2.7 Cash Flow Dilemma Migraine 66 2.8 Scope Change Dilemma Migraine 67 2.9 Outsource or Not Migraine 68 2.10 Determining When to Cancel a Project Migraine 68 2.11 Providing Project Awards Migraine 69 2.12 Migraine from Having the Wrong Culture in Place 70 2.13 Migraines Due to Politics 71 2.14 Migraines Caused by the Seven Deadly Sins 78 2.15 Sources of Smaller Headaches 91 2.16 Ten Uglies of Projects 94 3 JOURNEY TO EXCELLENCE 103 3.0 Introduction 103 3.1 Strategic Planning for Project Management 106 3.2 Roadblocks to Excellence 114 3.3 Hitachi Ltd. 115 References 121 3.4 RTA’s Top Management Support for Project Management Excellence 126 Levels of PMO Hierarchy 129 Top Management and Mega Projects 133 Push for Knowledge Sharing 137 3.5 Intel Corporation and “Map Days” 141 3.6 Apple Computer and Cell Phones 142 3.7 The Light at the End of the Tunnel 142 3.8 Pursuit Healthcare Advisors 144 3.9 Managing Assumptions 148 3.10 Managing Assumptions in Conservation Projects—WWF 149 3.11 Project Governance 153 3.12 Seven Fallacies That Delay Project Management Maturity 154 3.13 Motorola 157 3.14 Texas Instruments 158 3.15 Hewlett-Packard: Recognizing the Need 160 3.16 Hewlett-Packard: The Journey and the Obstacles 162 3.17 Naviair: On Time—On Budget 169 3.18 Avalon Power and Light 178 3.19 Roadway Express 180 3.20 Kombs Engineering 181 3.21 Williams Machine Tool Company 182 4 PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGIES 185 4.0 Introduction 185 4.1 Excellence Defi ned 186 4.2 Recognizing the Need for Methodology Development 187 4.3 Enterprise Project Management Methodologies 191 4.4 Benefi ts of a Standard Methodology 196 4.5 Critical Components 197 4.6 Airbus Space and Defence: Integration of the APQP Methodology within Project Life Cycle 199 4.7 Project Quality Gates—Structured Approach to Ensure Project Success 201 4.8 Airbus Space and Defense: Integrated Multilevel Schedules 205 4.9 Técnicas Reunidas 208 4.10 Yanfeng Global Automotive Interior Systems Co. Ltd. 214 4.11 Sony Corporation and Earned Value Management 216 4.12 Project Management Tools and Socialized Project Management 220 4.13 Artifi cial Intelligence and Project Management 221 4.14 Life-Cycle Phases 223 4.15 Expanding Life-Cycle Phases 224 4.16 Churchill Downs Incorporated 224 4.17 Indra: The Need for a Methodology 226 4.18 Implementing the Methodology 228 4.19 Implementation Blunders 229 4.20 Overcoming Development and Implementation Barriers 230 4.21 Wärtsilä: Recognizing the Need for Supporting Tools 230 4.22 General Motors Powertrain Group 232 4.23 Ericsson Telecom AB 233 4.24 Indra: Closing the Project 236 4.25 Rockwell Automation: Quest for a Common Process 238 4.26 Sherwin-Williams 243 4.27 Hewlett-Packard 247 4.28 Airbus Space and Defence: Golden Rules in Project Management 248 4.29 When Traditional Methodologies May Not Work 251 5 INTEGRATED PROCESSES 255 5.0 Introduction 255 5.1 Understanding Integrated Management Processes 256 5.2 Evolution of Complementary Project Management Processes 257 5.3 Zurich America Insurance Company 261 5.4 Total Quality Management 262 5.5 Concurrent Engineering 267 5.6 Risk Management 268 5.7 Wärtsilä: The Need for Proactive Risk Management 271 5.8 Indra: When a Risk Becomes Reality (Issue Management) 272 5.9 The Failure of Risk Management 276 5.10 Defi ning Maturity Using Risk Management 277 5.11 Boeing Aircraft Company 278 5.12 Change Management 278 5.13 Other Management Processes 279 6 CULTURE 281 6.0 Introduction 281 6.1 Creation of a Corporate Culture 282 6.2 Corporate Values 284 6.3 Types of Cultures 285 6.4 Corporate Cultures at Work 287 6.5 GEA and Heineken Collaboration: A Learning Experience 289 6.6 Indra: Building a Cohesive Culture 295 6.7 DFCU Financial 299 6.8 Hewlett-Packard 316 6.9 Barriers to Implementing Project Management in Emerging Markets 317 7 MANAGEMENT SUPPORT 325 7.0 Introduction 325 7.1 Visible Support from Senior Managers 325 7.2 Project Sponsorship 326 7.3 Excellence in Project Sponsorship 331 7.4 The Need for a Project Cancellation Criteria 331 7.5 Hewlett-Packard Sponsorship in Action 333 7.6 Zurich America Insurance Company: Improving Stakeholder Engagement 333 7.7 Project Governance 335 7.8 Tokio Marine: Excellence in Project Governance 337 7.9 Empowerment of Project Managers 343 7.10 Management Support at Work 344 7.11 Getting Line Management Support 347 7.12 Initiation Champions and Exit Champions 347 8 TRAINING AND EDUCATION 353 8.0 Introduction 353 8.1 Training for Modern Project Management 353 8.2 Need for Business Education 355 8.3 SAP: Importance of a Project Management Career Path 356 8.4 Program Management Training at thyssenkrupp North America 358 8.5 International Institute for Learning 360 8.6 Identifying the Need for Training 364 8.7 Selecting Participants 365 8.8 Fundamentals of Project Management Education 366 8.9 Some Changes in Project Management Education 367 8.10 Designing Courses and Conducting Training 368 8.11 Measuring the Return on Investment on Education 371 8.12 Project Management Is Now a Profession 372 8.13 Competency Models 373 8.14 Harris Corporation 385 8.15 Nokia: Recognizing the Value of Project Management Excellence 390 8.16 Hewlett-Packard 393 9 INFORMAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT 395 9.0 Introduction 395 9.1 Informal versus Formal Project Management 395 9.2 Trust 398 9.3 Communication 399 9.4 Cooperation 401 9.5 Teamwork 402 9.6 Color-Coded Status Reporting 403 9.7 Crisis Dashboards 403 9.8 Informal Project Management at Work 406 10 BEHAVIORAL EXCELLENCE 409 10.0 Introduction 409 10.1 Situational Leadership 409 10.2 Confl ict Resolution 412 10.3 Staffi ng for Excellence 414 10.4 Virtual Project Teams 416 10.5 Rewarding Project Teams 418 10.6 Keys to Behavioral Excellence 421 10.7 Proactive versus Reactive Management 425 11 MEASURING RETURN ON INVESTMENT ON PROJECT MANAGEMENT TRAINING DOLLARS 429 11.0 Introduction 429 11.1 Project Management Benefi ts 430 11.2 Growth of ROI Modeling 431 11.3 The ROI Model 432 11.4 Planning Life-Cycle Phase 433 11.5 Data Collection Life-Cycle Phase 434 11.6 Data Analysis Life-Cycle Phase 437 11.7 Reporting Life-Cycle Phase 441 11.8 Conclusions 441 12 THE PROJECT OFFICE 443 12.0 Introduction 443 12.1 Boeing 446 12.2 Philips Business Group Patient Care and Monitoring Services 448 12.3 NTT DATA 457 12.4 Cisco Systems 466 12.5 Churchill Downs Incorporated: Establishing a PMO 468 12.6 Churchill Downs Incorporated: Managing Scope Changes 469 12.7 Types of Project Offi ces 473 12.8 Hewlett-Packard 475 12.9 Star Alliance 477 12.10 Project Audits and the PMO 478 12.11 Project Health Checks 482 12.12 PMO of the Year Award 484 13 SIX SIGMA AND THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE 493 13.0 Introduction 493 13.1 Project Management—Six Sigma Relationship 493 13.2 Involving the PMO 494 13.3 Traditional versus Nontraditional Six Sigma 495 13.4 Understanding Six Sigma 498 13.5 Six Sigma Myths 500 13.6 Use of Assessments 502 13.7 Project Selection 504 13.8 Typical PMO Six Sigma Projects 506 14 PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 509 14.0 Introduction 509 14.1 The Portfolio Management Journey at Nordea 510 14.2 Resource Management as Part of Portfolio Management at Nordea 512 14.3 Involvement of Senior Management, Stakeholders, and the PMO 515 14.4 Project Selection Obstacles 520 14.5 Identifi cation of Projects 520 14.6 Preliminary Evaluation 524 14.7 Strategic Selection of Projects 525 14.8 Strategic Timing 528 14.9 Analyzing the Portfolio 529 14.10 Problems with Meeting Expectations 531 14.11 Portfolio Management at Rockwell Automation 533 14.12 WWF—World Wide Fund for Nature (also Known as World Wildlife Fund) 535 15 GLOBAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 539 15.0 Introduction 539 15.1 IBM 540 15.2 Citigroup, Inc. 557 15.3 Microsoft Corporation 561 15.4 Deloitte: Enterprise Program Management 573 15.5 Comau 594 15.6 Fluor Corporation: Knowledge Management for Project Execution 611 15.7 Siemens PLM Software: Developing a Global Project Management Methodology 624 16 VALUE-DRIVEN PROJECT MANAGEMENT 633 16.0 Introduction 633 16.1 Value over the Years 634 16.2 Values and Leadership 636 17 EFFECT OF MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS ON PROJECT MANAGEMENT 653 17.0 Introduction 653 17.1 Planning for Growth 653 17.2 Project Management Value-Added Chain 654 17.3 Preacquisition Decision Making 657 17.4 Landlords and Tenants 662 17.5 Some Best Practices When Companies Work Together 663 17.6 Integration Results 664 17.7 Value Chain Strategies 667 17.8 Failure and Restructuring 668 18 AGILE AND SCRUM 671 18.0 Introduction 671 18.1 Introduction to Agile Delivery 673 18.2 Introduction to Scrum 687 18.3 Deloitte and Enterprise Value Delivery for Agile Method 703 18.4 The Risk of Metric Mania 710 19 BENEFITS REALIZATION AND VALUE MANAGEMENT 715 19.0 Introduction 715 19.1 Understanding the Terminology 715 19.2 Redefi ning Project Success 718 19.3 Value-Drive Project Management 720 19.4 Benefi ts Harvesting 721 19.5 The Business Case 722 19.6 Timing for Measuring Benefi ts and Value 723 19.7 Investment Life-Cycle Phases 724 19.8 Categories of Benefi ts and Value 729 19.9 Converting Benefi ts to Value 732 19.10 Go-Live Project Management 732 19.11 Portfolio Benefi ts and Value 732 19.12 Alignment to Strategic Objectives 734 19.13 Causes of Complete or Partial BRM Failure 736 19.14 Conclusion 737 INDEX 739
HAROLD KERZNER, Ph.D., is Senior Executive Director for Project Management at the International Institute for Learning, Inc. (IIL), a global learning solutions company offering professional training and consulting services worldwide. Dr. Kerzner's profound effect on the project management industry inspired IIL to establish, in coordination with PMI, the Kerzner International Project Manager of the Year Award, which is presented to a distinguished PMP® or global equivalent each year. INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING, INC. (IIL) is a global leader in professional training and comprehensive consulting services in the areas of project, program, and portfolio management, PRINCE2®, ITIL, Business Analysis, Microsoft® Office Project and Project Server, and Lean Six Sigma. IIL is an IIBA-endorsed education provider, a PMI® charter global registered education provider, and a member of PMI's Silver Alliance Circle and their Corporate Council.

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