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Crochet Stitches VISUAL™ Encyclopedia

300 Stitch Patterns, Edgings, and More

Robyn Chachula

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Credits

Acquisitions Editor

Pam Mourouzis

Senior Project Editor

Donna Wright

Copy Editor

Marylouise Wiack

Technical Editor

Julie Holetz

Editorial Manager

Christina Stambaugh

Vice President and Publisher

Cindy Kitchel

Vice President and Executive Publisher

Kathy Nebenhaus

Interior Design

Jennifer Mayberry

Photography

Matt Bowen

Special Thanks…

The yarns used in the book were all graciously donated by the following yarn companies. Thank you so much for all your support and quick response to all my requests, I truly appreciate all that you have given me. They are

Blue Sky Alpaca (Alpaca Silk)

Cascade Yarns (Cascade 220 Sport and Pima Tencel)

Lion Brand (Cottonease)

Caron International (Country)

Coats and Clark (Soft Yarn and Eco-ways).

Each yarn chosen highlights either the technique perfectly with amazing stitch definition or makes the color pop off the page with their wonderful color schemes.

About the Author

Robyn Chachula (Pittsburgh, PA) is a crochet designer with a background in structural engineering. Whether she is building a concrete building or a granny square blanket, her approach to designing them is the same: She takes a big project and breaks it down into little items that she can understand, then pieces them back together for the big picture. In her book Blueprint Crochet: Modern Designs for the Visual Crocheter, she used her engineering background and crochet symbols to bring crochet to new learners. Its follow-up, Baby Blueprint Crochet, marries more challenging stitch diagrams with a modern take on baby projects. Her patterns in Mission Falls Goes Crochet are for the whole family. Fans can catch her as one of the crochet experts on Knit and Crochet Now on PBS, or on her blog, Crochet by Faye (www.crochetbyfaye.blogspot.com).

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Acknowledgments

This book gave me so much pleasure in diving into, researching, and testing all aspects of crochet; I want to thank all the creative designers who have come before me to inspire and challenge my own designs.

Crocheting all the swatches in the book was a pure joy, but I had to share the fun to get the book finished. I had the fantastic help from my wonderful friends and contract crocheters, Diane Halpern, Rebecca DeSensi, Megan Granholm, Virginia Boundy, Amy Maceyko, and Susan Jeffers.

Thank you to everyone at Wiley, especially Donna Wright, Pam Mourouzis, and Marylouise Wiack for making the ramblings of a sleep deprived mom sound intelligent. A special thank you to Julie Holetz, our technical crochet editor, for re-reading and counting every stitch in the book over and over with me.

Most importantly, I would like to thank my friends and family for all their love and support in every crazy challenge I take on. Your joy to jump in and help entertain the baby while I squirreled away on the book I cannot thank you enough. I would especially like to thank my husband, Mark, for his unwavering love. Without his encouragement and help, this book would not have been possible.

Lastly, I want to thank you. Thank you for enjoying what I love to do so much. Your enthusiasm of crochet is what keeps me energized to share my kooky designs, so thank you very much!

Introduction

As an art form and a craft, crochet spans centuries and countries around the world. In this book, I tried to pay homage to that fact. Inside you will find patterns that date from Victorian lacework, 1960s retro granny squares, and modern interpretations of crochet. The stitches span the globe from the United States to the Ukraine to Japan to South America and more. I wanted to compile and touch on as many forms of this unique craft as I could. You will find patterns that look deceptively like knitting, but in actuality are simply slip stitch crochet, and the patterns might look deceptively challenging—like the mosaic colorwork pattern—but in actuality are simply stripes of color. You will also find motifs that range from the classic granny square to gothic window inspired hexagons. In the Tunisian chapter, you can explore my favorite part of the technique, which is the woven-like fabric it can create.

Using my tips and tricks to make your work look sensational, I hope this book will jump-start your creativity in crochet. You can mix and match any of the edgings with any of the stitch patterns for unique scarves or blankets, or try new-to-you methods of joining motifs and granny squares for exceptional shawls and afghans. How about testing out complex cables as borders on your next cardigan?

Crochet Symbol Basics

Every stitch pattern in this book has a helpful diagram associated with it. With a few tips, these diagrams can become your best guide to successful crocheting. The key to understanding crochet symbols is that each symbol represents a crochet stitch. (For a list of crochet symbols, see page 270.) I like to think of them as little stick diagrams of the actual stitch because crochet symbols try to mimic the actual stitch as close as possible. The best thing about the symbols is they are used internationally. Once you master them, you can use the symbols in any crochet book from Russia to Japan.

Stitches

First let’s look at the smallest stitch, the chain. The symbol is an oval. Why an oval? Well, think about making a chain stitch: It’s a loop pulled through another loop that looks a lot like interlocking ovals. Next is the slip stitch, which is a filled dot. It is little and almost invisible, just like the actual stitch. The single crochet is a squat cross, again just like the stitch. The half double crochet is slightly taller than the single crochet. The double crochet is taller than the half double and has an extra cross in its middle. From the double crochet up, the little cross tells you how many yarn overs you have before you insert your hook. Go ahead, make a double crochet. Now look at your stitch: Do you see the little cross in the middle of the stitch? That’s why the double crochet symbol has that bar in the middle of its post. The rest of the symbols fall in line with the same reasoning. If the stitch is short, the symbol will be short; if the stitch puffs out, the symbol will as well.

Diagrams

As previously mentioned, every pattern in the book has a stitch diagram alongside the written directions. This is to help guide you in the pattern and make it easier to see where the stitches will be created.

Granny Squares

To read granny square diagrams, you start in the center just as you would to crochet. Following the symbol key, crochet the stitches you see. The numbers on the diagram let you know where the beginning of each round is so you can keep track of where you are. Granny square diagrams feature each round in a new color so it’s easy to keep track of what round you are on.

Stitch Pattern

Stitch pattern diagrams are not much different than granny square diagrams. The key difference is that instead of crocheting in the round, you crochet back and forth in turned rows. Therefore, when reading the diagram, you start at the bottom foundation chain. The diagrams in this book have a gray section that indicates the stitch pattern repeat. To start crocheting, make as many chains as the diagram shows. To do so, crochet a multiple of the number of chains in the gray highlighted area plus the ones not included in the shading. Then, following the symbol key, crochet the stitches you see for the first row. At the end of the row, turn, and continue crocheting the stitches you see for the following rows. The numbers on the diagram let you know where the beginning of each row is so you can keep track of where you are. Each diagram uses a new color for each row so it’s easy to keep track of what row you are on.

Chapter 1

Simple Stitch Patterns

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Slip Stitch Patterns

Slip Stitch

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The smallest of all the stitches, this dense fabric makes great kitchen scrubbies with cotton yarn.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sl st in 1st ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Sl st in ea sl st across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Front Loop Slip Stitch

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This simple pattern makes a thin fabric that is great for hats.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sl st in 1st ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Sl st flp in ea sl st across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Back Loop Slip Stitch

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Looking for a ribbing that very closely matches knitting? This pattern is for you.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sl st in 1st ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Sl st blp in ea sl st across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Purl Slip Stitch

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This pattern can easily pass for purl stitches in knitting.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sl st in 1st ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Sl st blp in ea sl st across, turn.

Row 3: Sl st flp in ea sl st across, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Single Crochet Patterns

Single Crochet

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The fattest of all the stitches, single crochet comes in handy for any project, from sweaters to toys.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in ea sc across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Foundation Single Crochet

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This is a great way to start projects if your crochet chains are always too tight. It creates the chain and first row of single crochet at the same time.

Ch 2, insert hk in 2nd ch from hk, pull up lp, yo, draw through 1 lp (the “ch”), yo, draw through 2 lps (the “sc”), *insert hk under 2 lps of the “ch” st of last st and pull up lp, yo, and draw through 1 lp, yo and draw through 2 lps; rep from * for length of foundation.

Single Crochet Ribbing

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This ribbing is faster to crochet than slip stitch ribbing, with the same amount of elasticity.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc blp in ea sc across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Alternating Single Crochet Spike

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This fabric makes very warm vests for men and kids.

Single Crochet Spike (sc spike): Insert hk into st 1 row below, pull up lp, yo, and pull through all lps on hk.

Ch an even number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in 1st sc, *sc spike over next sc into ch below, sc in next sc; rep from * across, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in 1st 2 sc, *sc spike over next sc, sc in next sc; rep from * across to last sc, sc in last sc, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1, sc in 1st sc, *sc spike over next sc, sc in next sc; rep from * across, turn.

Rep rows 3 and 4 to desired length.

Tweed

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This simple stitch pattern can transform itself into tweed when you crochet each row in a different color.

Ch an even number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk, *ch 1, sk next ch, sc in next ch; rep from * across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in 1st sc, sc in next ch-1 sp, *ch 1, sk next sc, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last sc, sc in last sc, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in 1st sc, *ch 1, sk next sc, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last 2 sts, ch 1, sk next sc, sc in last sc, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Angled

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This lightweight pattern is perfect for cardigans and skirts that need to move.

Ch a multiple of 3 sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk, ch 3, sc in next ch, sk next ch, *sc in next ch, ch 3, sc in next ch, sk next ch; rep from * across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, (sc, ch 3, sc) in ea ch-3 sp across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Rocking

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A mix of lace and texture makes this simple pattern great for baby blankets.

Ch an even number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Sc2tog over 2nd and 3rd ch from hk, *ch 1, sc3tog over prev ch and next 2 ch; rep from * across to last 2 ch, ch 1, sc2tog over prev ch and last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc2tog over 1st sc and next ch-1 sp, *ch 1, sc3tog over prev ch-1 sp and next sc and ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, ch 1, sc2tog over prev ch-1 sp and last sc, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Extended Single Crochet

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This very thin fabric works well for all types of projects, from socks to gloves.

Extended single crochet (esc): Insert hk into next st, yo and pull up a lp, yo, draw through 1 lp on hk, yo, and draw through rem 2 lps on hk.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Esc in 3rd ch from hk (sk ch counts as esc) and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as esc), esc in ea esc across to t-ch, esc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Extended Mesh

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Extended stitch sits slightly angled, and when combined with classic mesh, it makes a drapey fabric that is great for lots of projects.

Ch an odd number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Esc in 5th ch from hk (counts as esc, ch-1 sp), *ch 1, sk 1 ch, esc in next ch; rep from * across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as esc, ch-1 sp), *sk next ch-1 sp, esc in next esc, ch 1; rep from * across to t-ch, esc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Half Double Crochet Patterns

Half Double Crochet

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Being short and thick, half double crochet stitches can be the black sheep of the crochet family, but they are unique in the way they wrap yarn overs around the post. They form the basis for a number of amazing stitch patterns.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Hdc in 3rd ch from hk (sk ch counts as hdc), hdc in ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as hdc), hdc in ea hdc across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Waffle Rib

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A very textured stitch pattern makes for a great fabric for warm, snuggly sweaters.

Ch an even number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Hdc in 3rd ch from hk (sk ch counts as hdc), hdc in ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as hdc), *hdc blp in next hdc, hdc flp in next hdc; rep from * across to last 2 sts, hdc blp in next hdc, hdc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Middle Bar Half Double Crochet

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Crocheting in the middle bar makes a great fabric with a defined horizontal line.

Middle Bar: Insert hk into middle of wrong side of the hdc st that is formed by the yo in the hdc st. The middle bar is below the top 2 lps.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Hdc in 3rd ch from hk (sk ch counts as hdc), hdc in ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as hdc), hdc in middle bar of ea hdc across to t-ch, hdc in top of t-ch, turn.

Row 3: Ch 2 (counts as hdc), hdc in ea hdc across to last t-ch, hdc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Forked Half Double Crochet

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Crocheting in the middle bar makes a great fabric with a defined horizontal line.

Forked Half Double Crochet (fk hdc): Yo hk, insert hk into next st indicated, pull up lp, yo hk, insert hk into next st indicated, pull up lp, yo hk, pull through 3 lps on hk, yo hk, pull through last 3 lps on hk.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Fk hdc in 3rd and 4th ch from hk (sk ch counts as dc), fk hdc in prev and next ch across to last ch, dc in last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), fk hdc in 3rd ch and next hdc, fk hdc in prev and next hdc across to t-ch, dc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Double Crochet Patterns

Double Crochet

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The double crochet is the most useful stitch in a crocheter’s toolbox. It can make thin fabric and when combined with other stitches can form an infinite number of patterns.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Dc in 4th ch from hk (sk ch counts as dc), dc in ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), dc in ea dc across to t-ch, dc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Foundation Double Crochet

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Foundation double crochet is perfect to use when your project needs an elastic foundation.

Ch 4 sts.

Yo, insert hk into 4th ch from hk, pull up lp, yo, draw through 1 lp (the “ch”), [yo, draw through 2 lps] twice (the “dc”).

Yo, insert hk under 2 lps of the “ch” portion of last st and pull up lp, yo, and draw through 1 lp, [yo and draw through 2 lps] twice.

Rep for desired length.

Herringbone Double Crochet

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This is a fun stitch that puts a new twist on a classic just by slightly changing how you pull off the loops.

Herringbone Double Crochet (herr dc): Yo hk, insert hk into next st indicated, yo, pull through st and 1st lp on hk, yo, pull through 1 lp on hk, yo, pull through last 2 lps on hk.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1: Herr dc in 4th ch from hk and ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as herr dc), herr dc in ea dc across, turn.

Rep row 2 for desired length.

Double Crochet Group

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By grouping double crochet stitches, you end up with an interesting vertical stitch pattern that looks more than just simple.

Ch an odd number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Dc in 5th ch from hk (sk ch counts as dc), dc in same ch, *sk 1 ch, 2 dc in next ch; rep from * across to last 2 ch, sk 1 ch, dc in last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc btw next 2 dc group across, dc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Diamond Tweed

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This tweed stitch pattern forms tiny little diamonds all over the fabric for a lacy effect.

Ch an odd number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Dc in 4th ch from hk (sk ch counts as dc2tog), ch 1, *dc2tog in prev ch and ch 2 away (skipping 1 ch), ch 1; rep from * across to last ch, dc2tog in prev and last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), *dc2tog in prev and next dc2tog (sk ch-sp), ch 1; rep from * across to t-ch, dc2tog in prev dc2tog and top of t-ch, dc in top of t-ch, turn.

Row 3: Ch 2, dc in 1st dc2tog, *ch 1, dc2tog in prev and next dc2tog (sk ch-sp); rep from * across to t-ch, ch 1, dc2tog in prev dc2tog and top of t-ch, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Wrapped Double Crochet

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Wrapped stitches spice up an otherwise boring stitch pattern by changing the direction of the stitch from vertical to horizontal. Use them anytime you want to add a little pop of texture.

Wrapped Double Crochet Two Together (wdc2tog): *Yo, insert hk from front of fabric around posts of prev 2 dc, yo, pull up lp, yo, pull through 2 lps on hk; rep from * once around same 2 dc, yo, pull through rem lps on hk.

V-Stitch (v-st): [Dc, ch 1, dc] in st indicated.

Ch a multiple of 6 sts plus 3.

Row 1 (RS): Dc in 4th ch from hk (counts as dc), *sk next ch, v-st in next ch, sk next ch, dc in next 3 ch; rep from * across to last 5 ch, sk next ch, v-st in next ch, sk next ch, dc in last 2 ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), dc in next dc, v-st in next ch-1 sp, *dc in next 2 dc, wdc2tog around prev 2 dc, v-st in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last 2 dc, dc in next dc, dc in top of t-ch, turn.

Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as dc), dc in next dc, v-st in next ch-1 sp, *dc in next 3 dc, v-st in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last 2 dc, dc in next dc, dc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Treble Crochet Patterns

Treble Crochet

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The treble crochet and taller stitches (like double treble and triple treble) make a lacy fabric just by the natural height of their stitch.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Tr in 5th ch from hk (sk ch counts as tr), tr in ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as tr), tr in ea st across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Linked Treble Crochet

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This unique stitch makes a fantastic solid fabric without adding weight to your project. The horizontal lines also make a great chart to embroider on later.

Linked Treble Crochet (ltr): Description is below.

Setup Stitch: Ch 4, insert hk into 2nd ch from hk, yo, pull up lp, insert hk into 3rd ch from hk, yo, pull up lp, insert hk into next st, yo, pull up lp (4 lps on hk), yo, draw through 2 lps on hk, yo, draw through next 2 lps, yo, draw through last 2 lps (1st st made).

Next Stitches: Insert hk into upper horiz bar of prev st from top to bottom (the 1st bar is found below the sts’ top 2 lps), yo, pull up lp, insert hk into lower horiz bar, yo, pull up lp, insert hk into next st, yo, pull up lp (4 lps on hk), yo, draw through 2 lps on hk, yo, draw through next 2 lps, yo, draw through last 2 lps.

Ch any number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Complete 1st ltr in 2nd, 3rd, and 5th ch from hk, ltr in ea ch across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 4 (does not count as a tr), ltr in 2nd ch, 3rd ch, and next st, ltr in ea st across, turn.

Rep row 2 to desired length.

Combined Stitch Patterns

Brick

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This stitch pattern is another unique combination of uncomplicated texture without weight. It makes a great fabric for coats or afghans.

Ch a multiple of 4 sts plus 2.

Row 1 (WS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk, *ch 3, sk 3 ch, sc in next ch; rep from * across to end, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), 3 dc in ea ch-3 sp across, dc in last sc, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in 1st dc, ch 3, sk 3 dc, *sc btw prev and next dc, ch 3, sk 3 dc; rep from * across to t-ch, sc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Block

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Similar to the brick stitch pattern, this one steps up the texture a notch with post stitches.

Ch a multiple of 3 sts plus 2.

Row 1 (WS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk, *ch 2, sk 2 ch, sc in next ch; rep from * across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc), *2 dc in next ch-2 sp, FPdc around next sc; rep from * across to last ch-2 sp, 2 dc in last ch-2 sp, dc in last sc, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in 1st dc, *ch 2, sk 2 dc, sc in next dc; rep from * across to last FPdc, ch 2, sk 2 dc, sc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Aligned

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This unassuming stitch pattern makes a lovely fabric for garments with its mixture of double and single crochet stitches.

Ch an odd number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): 2 dc in 5th ch from hk (sk ch counts as dc), *sk 1 ch, 2 dc (dc group made) in next ch; rep from * across to last 2 ch, sk 1 ch, dc in last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in 1st dc, *ch 1, sc in sp btw next 2 dc (center of dc group); rep from * across to t-ch, ch 1, sc in top of t-ch, turn.

Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc in ea sc across to last sc, dc in last sc, turn.

Rep rows 2 and 3 to desired length.

Jacquard

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When alternating colors in this stitch pattern, you get a great jacquard-like tweed. Because the stitch pattern is a combination of double and single crochet, it is light enough even for garments.

Ch an odd number of sts.

Row 1 (RS): Dc in 4th ch from hk, *ch 1, dc2tog in same ch and 2 ch away (sk 1 ch); rep from * across to last 2 ch, ch 1, dc2tog in last 2 ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in dc2tog, *sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk dc2tog; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, sc in last ch-1 sp, sc in dc, turn.

Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as dc), dc2tog in 1st sc and ch-1 sp, *ch 1, dc2tog in same ch-1 sp and next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, ch 1, dc2tog in last ch-1 sp and last sc, dc in last sc, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1, sc in dc, *ch 1, sk dc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, sc in last ch-sp, ch 1, sk dc2tog, sc in top of t-ch, turn.

Row 5: Ch 2, dc in ch-1 sp, *ch 1, dc2tog in same ch-1 sp and next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, ch 1, dc2tog in last ch-1 sp and last sc, turn.

Rep rows 2–5 to desired length.

Chicken Foot

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Half double crochet takes a starring role in this stitch pattern by leaving little, diagonal star-like lines in the fabric.

Ch an even number of sts.

Row 1 (WS): Sc in 2nd ch from hk, *ch 1, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch; rep from * across, turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as hdc, ch 1), *hdc2tog in next ch-1 sp and sc, ch 1; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp and sc, hdc2tog in last ch-1 sp and sc, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in hdc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, *ch 1, sk next hdc2tog, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to t-ch, sc in 2nd ch on t-ch, turn.

Row 4: Ch 2 (counts as hdc), hdc2tog in 1st 2 sc, ch 1, *hdc2tog in next ch-1 sp and sc, ch 1; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, hdc2tog in last ch-1 sp and next sc, hdc in last sc, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, sc in hdc, *ch 1, sk next hdc2tog, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across to t-ch, ch 1, sk hdc2tog, sc in top of t-ch, turn.

Rep rows 2–5 to desired length.