001

Table of Contents
 
Title Page
Copyright Page
Dedication
PREFACE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
ORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK
Acknowledgments
REFERENCES
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
 
PART ONE - INTRODUCTION
 
CHAPTER ONE - Fostering Transformative Learning
 
CORE ELEMENTS
CONCLUSION
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TWO - Transformative Learning Theory
 
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING: ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT
INSTRUMENTAL AND COMMUNICATIVE LEARNING
EPISTEMIC ASSUMPTIONS
DYNAMICS: THE LEARNING PROCESS
APPLICATION: GRADUATE ADULT EDUCATION
PSYCHOLOGY AND TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
PROMISING DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
REFERENCES
 
PART TWO - TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS HIGHER EDUCATION
CHAPTER THREE - Creating Alternative Realities
 
POPULAR THEATER: EXPERIENTIAL AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROCESSES
RANDEE’S STORY: IMAGES OF OPPRESSION—LOOKING THROUGH A MIRROR
SHAUNA’S STORY: SPEAKING TRUTH TO POWER
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER FOUR - Constructive Teaching and Learning
 
THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING IN A SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT
DOING COLLABORATION
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER FIVE - Facilitating Transformative Learning
 
OUR CONTEXT
DESIGN AND PEDAGOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS
IMPLEMENTATION OF PEDAGOGICAL STRATEGIES TO FOSTER TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING ONLINE
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER SIX - Fostering Transformative Learning in Leadership Development
 
CONCEPTUAL UNDERPINNINGS AND DISCONNECTS
TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICES
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER SEVEN - Mentoring
 
THE PRINCIPLES OF MENTORING
FOUR EXAMPLES OF MENTORING
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER EIGHT - Transformative Approaches to Culturally Responsive Teaching
 
DEFINING CULTURAL IMAGINATION
ENGAGING CULTURAL IMAGINATION IN OUR PRACTICE
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER NINE - Promoting Dialogic Teaching Among Higher Education Faculty in ...
 
GUIDING LEARNERS TO ADOPT AND IMPLEMENT DIALOGIC TEACHING
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TEN - Transformative Palliative Care Education
 
PALLIATIVE CARE
DESCRIPTION OF TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICES
VALUE AND RESULTS OF EVALUATING THE EXPERIENCE
OTHER REFLECTIVE APPROACHES
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
PART THREE - TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS WORKPLACE EDUCATION
CHAPTER ELEVEN - Engaging Critical Reflection in Corporate America
 
CRITICAL REFLECTION, CRITICAL THEORY, AND CAPITALISM
MODELING: THE BEGINNING OF TEACHING FOR CRITICAL REFLECTION
PEER LEARNING: THE CRUCIBLE FOR CRITICAL REFLECTION
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TWELVE - Charting the Course
 
STORYTELLING: AN OPERATIONAL DEFINITION
MEZIROW’S SEVEN CONDITIONS AND THEIR STORYTELLING CONNECTIONS
IMPLEMENTING STORYTELLING
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER THIRTEEN - Coaching to Transform Perspective
 
A CASE OF COACHING
WHY TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING?
GETTING READY TO BEGIN
THE COACHING SESSIONS COMMENCE
TOOLS IN THE COACHING
PREPARING FOR THE TRANSFER
REACTION TO PERSPECTIVE SHIFTS
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER FOURTEEN - The Transformative Potential of Action Learning Conversations
 
ACTION LEARNING CONVERSATIONS
APPLYING ALC AS A HEURISTIC
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER FIFTEEN - Transformative Learning in Adult Basic Education
 
TWO CONTEXTS
STRATEGIES
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER SIXTEEN - From Tradesperson to Teacher
 
PARTICIPATORY PLANNING
ACTIVITIES FOR CRITICAL SELF-REFLECTION
ARTS-BASED ACTIVITIES
SELF-EVALUATION AND SELF-GRADING
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
PART FOUR - TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL CHANGE
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN - Fostering a Learning Sanctuary for Transformation in ...
 
RECONCEPTUALIZING TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
CREATING A RESPONSIVE PRACTICE OF TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
FOSTERING SANCTUARY IN ADULT SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION
THE TEACHING AND LEARNING PROCESS
ADULT EDUCATION AS SANCTUARY
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN - Popular Education, Women’s Work, and Transforming Lives in Bolivia
 
TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING
THE OJM AND THE LEGAL PROMOTER’S COURSE
THE LEGAL PROMOTER’S COURSE IN COCHABAMBA, BOLIVIA
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER NINETEEN - Promoting Personal Empowerment with Women in East Harlem ...
 
PROGRAM GOALS AND ACTIVITIES
OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION
WRITING ABOUT ONE’S LIFE THROUGH JOURNALING
CONNECTING JOURNALING AND TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
CHALLENGES WITH JOURNALING AND COACHING
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TWENTY - Breaking Out of the Egg
 
THE SETTING
UNDERSTANDING FEMALE GENITAL CUTTING
ORIGIN AND GROWTH OF THE PROGRAM
THE PLEDGE OF MALICOUNDA-BAMBARA
THE CONSEQUENCES
TRANSFORMATION OF A METHODOLOGY
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE - Farmer Field Schools
 
THE FFS APPROACH
TRANSFORMATIVE OUTCOMES OF FFS
THE REFLECTIVE LEARNING PROCESS IN FFS
CONTEXTUAL CONSIDERATIONS
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO - Collaborative Inquiry in Action
 
COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY AND TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
THE PROCESS OF COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY
FACILITATION OF COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY
CHALLENGES AND CAVEATS IN PRACTICING COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE - Challenging Racism in Self and Others
 
WHITE SUPREMACIST CONSCIOUSNESS AS A MEANING PERSPECTIVE
CI AS A PRACTICE THAT FOSTERS TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
TRANSFORMING OUR CONSCIOUSNESS ABOUT WHITENESS AND TAKING ACTION
SYNERGISM OF ACTION AND REFLECTION, EXTENDED EPISTEMOLOGY, AND GROUP LEARNING
REFLECTIONS
REFERENCES
 
PART FIVE - REFLECTIONS
CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR - Looking Forward by Looking Back
 
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS PURPOSEFUL AND HEURISTIC PROCESS
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS CONFRONTING POWER AND ENGAGING DIFFERENCE
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS AN IMAGINATIVE PROCESS
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS LEADING LEARNERS TO THE EDGE
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS FOSTERING REFLECTION
TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING AS MODELING
CONCLUSION
REFERENCES
 
INDEX

001

The Jossey-Bass Higher Education Series

PREFACE
In the past decade, interest has been growing in the field of adult education and higher education about the practice of transformative learning: an approach to teaching based on promoting change, where educators challenge learners to critically question and assess the integrity of their deeply held assumptions about how they relate to the world around them.
Transformative learning has become the dominant teaching paradigm discussed within the field of adult education. It has interested scholars and educators to such an extent that it is no longer just an adult education teaching construct. Rather, it is becoming a standard of practice in a variety of disciplines and educational settings: higher education, professional education, organizational development, international education, and community education. For example, transformative learning guides instruction in a first-year sociology course at a Canadian university, where it provides a framework for facilitating critical refection in the workplace; it is used to promote female empowerment in Senegal for those who are fighting the practice of female genital cutting; it provides guidance in promoting community among online learners; and it guides the instruction for medical students in palliative care. These settings, as well as many others, begin to shed light on the broad reach that transformative learning offers higher and adult education as a viable and responsive practice.
Research about transformative learning also continues to grow exponentially, to the point that a national conference, held every couple of years, is devoted to this topic. Published research continues to grow as well. A recent review of this research shows that much of the focus is on fostering transformative learning. In other words, it is about understanding, identifying, and making sense of transformative learning as a practice in the classroom and other settings. Nevertheless, despite its growing presence as an area of research and a means of practice in a variety of settings, there is still much we do not know about the practice of transformative learning.
Many questions remain unanswered or inadequately understood. How are educators conceptualizing the purpose and practice of fostering transformative learning? What are effective practices for promoting transformative learning in formal and informal settings? What is it about transformative learning that is most helpful in informing practice? How does the teaching setting shape the practice of transformative learning? What are the successes, strengths, and outcomes of fostering transformative learning? What are the risks, challenges, and caveats when practicing it?
These questions and others form the foundation of this book, which seeks to bring to life the practice of transformative learning and its application within varied educational settings. The chapters in this book, written by a cadre of talented scholars and practitioners from a variety of adult and higher education contexts, reveal an in-depth and personal perspective about the everyday practice of fostering transformative learning within unique educational settings.
The contributors represent a diverse and experienced group of scholarpractitioners who are actively engaged in the work of transformative learning in a variety of national and international settings, among them higher education, corporations, and communities. Readers will be able to glean from these chapters strategies, methods, and caveats from experienced educators who deeply believe in the practice of transformative learning and who respect its challenges and appreciate its rewards.

ABOUT THIS BOOK

Compiling this book required a process of sorting through a variety of resources in an effort to identify individuals who could provide an informative chapter on the practice of transformative learning. The central source for this book was the conference proceedings of seven International Transformative Learning Conferences conducted from l998 to 2007, along with a review of published journal articles on fostering transformative learning (Taylor, 2000, 2007). Seven collaboratively planned conferences were held from 1998 and 2007: three were conducted in New York, and the others in California, Ontario, Michigan, and New Mexico. Each produced a comprehensive publication of peer-selected papers, accepted for presentation at the conference and included in conference proceedings.
These proceedings provided an invaluable resource ensuring diverse perspectives of fostering transformative learning. The breadth of application of transformative learning in each conference is reflected, for example, in the Proceedings of the Sixth Conference in Michigan, which contained thirty-two presentations, including addressing applications of transformative learning in education, organizations, religion, diversity, spirituality, gender, critical humility, transformation theory, disability, race, conflict resolution, research, popular education, community development, cross-cultural learning, autobiography, diversity, health, online education creativity, faculty development, films, democratic citizenship, and art. In addition to the proceedings, published research studies about fostering transformative learning were reviewed as well.
As book editors, we went through all the conference proceedings and published literature reviews relevant to fostering transformative learning. Our goal was to identify a host of contributors who provide a diverse approach to practice transformative learning within a variety of settings.

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK

The chapters are organized into five parts. Part One consists of two chapters that set the context for the book by providing an introduction to the practice of fostering transformative learning and to the theory of transformative learning. The next three parts, the heart of the book, contain twenty-two chapters that provide insight into the practice of fostering transformative learning in various settings: in higher education (nine chapters), workplace education (six chapters), and community and social change education (seven chapters). The one chapter in Part Five serves as a reflective analysis of all the chapters, identifying what they reveal as a whole about the practice of transformative learning.
The emphasis of reflection on practice is central to the entire book. Teaching is often a tacit and unreflective activity, with educators rarely writing up their ideas of practice for others to read. In response to this concern and in keeping with the idea of promoting a reflexive practice, we asked the contributors to look back and discuss what new insights and challenges they learned from this experience that would better inform interested practitioners about fostering transformative learning.
In addition, each contributor was asked to develop his or her chapter with an instrumental emphasis and less theoretical analysis concerning transformative learning. The intent was to provide practical and concrete instructional guidance to interested practitioners. We hope that the readers of this book will find new insights into practice and gain a greater appreciation of the challenges associated with fostering transformative learning regardless of the setting. We also hope readers will explore and take risks in their classrooms and informal educational settings, always pushing the limits of what is known about transformative education.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
A book of such breadth and depth does not come together without the hard work of dedicated individuals. We thank the contributors to this book particularly for their creative and thoughtful insights into fostering transformative learning, their promptness in submitting their chapters and turning around revisions in a timely manner, and their patience with our editorial comments. Furthermore, we acknowledge the invaluable contribution by Jodi Jarecke, a graduate assistant at Penn State University in Harrisburg. She spent many, many hours overseeing the administration of the book, editing, and providing insightful comments about the individual chapters. It was our good fortune to have her as part of the editorial team and as a contributor to the final chapter of the book.
 
September 2009
Jack Mezirow Edward W. Taylor

REFERENCES
Taylor, E. W. (2000). Fostering Mezirow’s transformative learning theory in the adult education classroom: A critical review. Canadian Journal of the Study of Adult Education, 14, 1-28.
Taylor, E. W. (2007). An update of transformative learning theory: A critical review of the empirical research (1999-2005). International Journal of Lifelong Education, 26, 173-191.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Lucia Alcántara is a seasoned consultant with expertise in organizational capacity building and development. Her career spans over ten years of working with executives and work groups in private and public corporations. She has cofacilitated several cooperative inquiry projects and is completing doctoral research on knowledge creation from inquiry groups at Columbia University’s Teachers College. The results of her research have been published in international conference journals for the Association for Human Resources Development and the Academy of Management’s Research Methods Division. As an educational facilitator she has taught management and multicultural relations at Cornell University and Russell Sage College, respectively. Alcántara holds a bachelor’s degree from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a master’s in public administration from Baruch College.
002
Stephen Brookfield is Distinguished University Professor at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. Since beginning his teaching career in 1970, he has worked in England, Canada, Australia, and the United States, teaching in a variety of college settings, including ten years as a professor of higher and adult education at Columbia University in New York. He has written ten books on adult learning, teaching, critical thinking, discussion methods, and critical theory, four of which have won the Cyril O. Houle World Award for Literature in Adult Education (in 1986, 1989, 1996, and 2005). He also won the 1986 Imogene Okes Award for Outstanding Research in Adult Education. His work has been translated into German, Finnish, and Chinese. In 1991, he was awarded an honorary doctor of letters degree from the University System of New Hampshire for his contributions to understanding adult learning. In 2001, he received the Leadership Award from the Association for Continuing Higher Education for “extraordinary contributions to the general field of continuing education on a national and international level.” He currently serves on the editorial boards of educational journals in Britain, Canada, and Australia, as well as in the United States. During 2002, he was a visiting professor at Harvard University. In 2003, he was awarded an honorary doctor of letters degree from Concordia University (St. Paul).
003
Shauna Butterwick is associate professor of adult education in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. She teaches foundations of adult education, community-based adult education, and feminist theory in the diploma and graduate adult education programs, as well as teaching in the educational leadership and policy doctoral program. Much of her research focuses on women’s learning, including learning in social movements, as well as women’s educational experiences in welfare programs and life skills training. Her scholarship also focuses on the policy context of adult education programs. She has experience with community-based, participatory research and a strong interest in the value and contribution of arts-based teaching and research. Among her publications is “Embodied Metaphors: Telling Feminist Coalition Stories Through Popular Theatre,” New Zealand Journal of Adult Learning (2005).
004
Patricia Cranton is a visiting professor of adult education at Penn State University in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Her primary research interests have been in the areas of teaching and learning in higher education, transformative learning, and, most recently, authenticity and individuation. Her most recent books include a second edition of Planning Instruction for Adult Learners (2000), Becoming an Authentic Teacher (2001), Finding Our Way: A Guide for Adult Educators (2003), and the second edition of Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning (2006). She received her Ph.D. degree in 1976 from the University of Toronto.
005
Deborah Davidson teaches in the Department of Sociology at York University in Toronto, Canada. While her primary research is in health and family, it was her love of teaching that brought her to research in the area of pedagogy. Her independently and coauthored refereed publications thus far include four articles in journals, three as book chapters, and one in a conference proceeding. She has been nominated for two teaching awards, has reviewed for the journal Excellence in Education, and has been invited to apply for board membership of the Open Education Journal. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from York University in Toronto, Canada.
006
John M. Dirkx is professor of higher, adult, and lifelong education and director of the Michigan Center for Education and Work at Michigan State University. He teaches courses on adult learning, transformative learning, program planning, teaching methods, training and professional development, group dynamics, and qualitative research. His primary research interests focus on the emotional, psychosocial, transformative, and spiritual dimensions of teaching and learning in adult and higher education. He is the coauthor of A Guide to Planning and Implementing Instruction for Adults: A Theme-Based Approach (1997) and numerous book chapters and journal articles on adult learning.
007
Joe F. Donaldson is professor of higher and continuing education and assistant director of the Statewide Cooperative Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Missouri-Columbia. His current research and writing focus on adult undergraduate students in higher education and education in the professions. His work has been published in the Adult Education Quarterly, Review of Higher Education, Medical Education, and Journal of Higher Education, among others. Donaldson is a consulting editor for the Adult Education Quarterly and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Continuing Higher Education. He has received numerous awards for his research and publications, including the 2002 Research and Scholarship Award from the University Continuing Education Association and the 2007 Marlowe Force award from the Association of Continuing Higher Education. Donaldson holds a B.S. and M.S. from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and a Ph.D. in continuing education from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
008
Deborah Duveskog is an agronomist currently pursuing a Ph.D. at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences with her doctoral research relating to analysis of the learning process and impact of change and transformation in Farmer Field Schools in East Africa. She has also been working for the U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization in the East Africa region for eight years, where she has managed a range of empowerment, extension, and community-development-related programs and supported the development of a participatory monitoring and evaluation system for community interventions. She has published a range of practitioner-oriented publications on the Farmer Field School approach and participatory monitory and education.
009
Peter Easton is associate professor of adult and international education at Florida State University, where he teaches courses in international development education, multicultural education, adult learning, and participatory methodologies. He has worked extensively in Africa and the Caribbean and is particularly interested in problems of education and employment and methods of adult learning. His recent publications include “Social Policy from the Bottom Up: Abandoning FGC in Sub-Saharan Africa” (with Karen Monkman and Rebecca Miles) in Development in Practice (2003); “Education and Indigenous Knowledge” in Rainer Wrote et al. Indigenous Knowledge: Local Pathways to Global Development (2004); and “Adult Education and Social Sustainability: Harnessing the Red Queen Effect,” in Convergence (2007). He received his Ph.D. from Florida State University.
010
Tony Egan is a psychologist and senior teaching fellow in the Department of the Dean, Dunedin School of Medicine, New Zealand. He has worked on curriculum development and evaluation in medical education for twenty years and sits on school and faculty committees responsible for development of the undergraduate medical course. He has researched and published on a wide range of topics, and his current preoccupations are the role of the hidden curriculum in medical education and learning and assessing how to achieve safe and effective clinical outcomes. He has a long-term affiliation with general practice (GP), coordinating continuing education for local GPs and contributing to the development of undergraduate programs in primary care and rural health. In 2003, he was elected to honorary fellowship of the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners. He is an enthusiastic contributor to ANZAME, the Australasian association for health professional education, editor of its journal, Focus on Health Professional Education, and serves as a reviewer for a number of journals.
011
The European-American Collaborative Challenging Whiteness fosters learning and research about white supremacist consciousness. It is a group of six white adult education practitioner-scholars who, as individuals, practice in a variety of institutional and community settings. They have been working together since 1998 to support each other in efforts to change their awareness about privilege, race, and racism and to become more effective as change agents in their professional and personal lives. Members, who came together through a cultural consciousness project at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, are Carole Balas, Elizabeth Karl, Alec MacLeod, Doug Paxton, Penny Rosenwasser, and Linda Sartor. They use a collective name because it reflects their beliefs about how knowledge is constructed. Inquiries about the collaborative’s work can be addressed to collaborative@eccw.org. Further information is available at http://www.iconoclastic.net/eccw/.
012
Beth Fisher-Yoshida is on the faculty in the Social and Organizational Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, and is also the associate director of the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution, where she oversees the education and practice functions of the center and conducts participatory action research. She also consults globally to corporate and nonprofit organizations, supporting them in their change efforts through organization development, strategic initiatives, team effectiveness, conflict resolution, and leadership development. A Certified Clinical Sociologist, she received her Ph.D. in human and organizational systems and M.A. in organization development from Fielding Graduate University; an M.A. in special education from Teachers College, Columbia University; and a B.S. in special education and B.A. in art from Buffalo State College.
013
Esbern Friis-Hansen works as a senior researcher with the Politics and Governance Group at the Danish Institute for International Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in geography and has twenty-five years of experience with social science development research and consultancies, primarily in East and southern Africa. His ongoing studies are in farmer empowerment and rural institutions in East and southern Africa; impact assessment of Farmer Field Schools in East Africa; and local governance of agricultural advisory services and social change in Soroti District, Uganda. He has published widely on agrarian issues in Africa and has contributed to agricultural policy formulating processes.
014
Sarah Gravett is professor of higher and adult education and dean of the faculty of education at the University of Johannesburg (UJ) in South Africa. Prior to taking up this position, she was deputy dean and the chair of the Department of Higher and Adult Education at UJ. Her research focus implies an interest in the cognitive and social dynamics of teaching and learning. More specifically, she has focused on teaching as a learning-centered endeavor with the explicit intent to guide, foster, advance, and support deep and meaningful learning. A main thrust of this research is the notion that deep and meaningful learning is best facilitated through educational dialogue. She is the author or coauthor of numerous books and articles on this and related themes.
015
Catherine A. Hansman is professor of adult learning and development at Cleveland State University and teaches master’s and doctoral courses in adult education and qualitative research. She is a recipient of a Cyril O. Houle Scholarship in Adult and Continuing Education for emerging scholars. She holds a bachelor of music from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, a master’s of education from Indiana University, and a doctorate in adult and community education from Ball State University. Her writings have been published in books, chapters, and journals such as Adult Basic Education, Adult Learning, and the Adult Education Quarterly.
016
Sandra Hayes is a lecturer at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she has taught collaborative negotiation, leadership, and action research. She also teaches conflict resolution and organizational communication at Fairleigh Dickinson University. As an organizational development consultant who specializes in collaborative negotiation strategies, team building, and leadership development, her experience includes designing, conducting, and facilitating meetings and training workshops for a host of profit and nonprofit institutions including the United Nations, Unicef, New York City Health and Hospital, Reuters, Praxair, Citibank, American Express, Lucent Technologies, New York City Board of Education, Association for the Help of Retarded Children, and New York University Wagner School of Public Service. Hayes is also a doctoral candidate in adult learning and leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University, where her research interest in adult learning and development has been bolstered by an ongoing interest in and study of the various ways adults can learn through inquiry.
017
Lee Herman has been a mentor at the State University of New York, Empire State College since 1979. He has won college and university awards for teaching and mentoring. He is cofounder of the Empire State College Mentoring Institute. With Alan Mandell, he has authored many articles and chapters, as well as the book From Teaching to Mentoring: Principle and Practice, Dialogue and Life in Adult Education (2004).
018
Barbara P. Heuer is assistant professor at Fordham University’s Graduate School of Education in New York City. She holds an M.L.S. from Rutgers University and an Ed.D. from the University of Georgia. With a background in information science and community service, she teaches in the master’s program in adult education and human resource development. Her research interests are in informal and online learning, information literacy, and adult development.
019
Jodi Jarecke is a graduate fellow and doctoral candidate in the Adult Education Department at Penn State Harrisburg. She received her M.P.H. from Northern Illinois University in 2005 and her B.A. from Rutgers University in 2000. She has developed educational programs and materials for community sustainability and preparedness initiatives through her work with local health departments and the AmeriCorps VISTA program. She has also worked on the development of medical education programs with the American Academy of Pediatrics, serving as managing editor for program materials for Pediatric First Aid for Caregivers and Teachers and the Pediatric Education for Prehospital Professionals. Her primary research interests include medical education and teaching and learning in the clinical environment.
020
Kathleen P. King, Ed.D., is professor of adult education at Fordham University’s Graduate School of Education in New York City. King’s major areas of research have been transformative learning, professional development, distance learning, and instructional technology. Her experience in adult learning has spanned these fields in varied organizations, including community-based organizations, business, higher education, career and technical education, and numerous partnerships. She continues to explore and develop learning innovations and opportunities to address equity, access, and international issues. She is the author of eleven books and numerous articles. In addition to receiving numerous academic and professional awards in the field of adult learning, her coedited book about distance education, Harnessing Innovations Technologies in Higher Education, received the Frandson Book Award from the University Continuing Education Association in 2007. King is the coeditor of Perspectives: The New York Journal of Adult Learning, and an editorial board member for several national and international academic journals.
021
Debra Langan is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty associate at the Centre for the Support of Teaching at York University in Toronto, Canada. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from York University. She is the recipient of the 2001 York Sociology Undergraduate Student Association’s John O’Neill Award for Teaching Excellence. Her research focuses on the scholarship of teaching and learning, families and intimate relations, qualitative methodology, and critical social psychology. Her publications can be accessed at www.arts.yorku.ca/soci/dlangan and include “Using Mothering at Work: Embracing the Contradictions in Pedagogy and Praxis,” Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering (2004); “Critical Pedagogy and Personal Struggles: Feminist Scholarship Outside Women’s Studies” (with Deborah Davidson), Feminist Teacher (2005); and “The Political Is Personal: TAs on the Front Lines of the Critical Consciousness Campaign” (with Marcia Oliver and Laurel Atkinson), Radical Pedagogy (2007).
022
Elizabeth A. Lange, Ph.D., M.Ed., B.Ed., is assistant professor of adult education in educational policy studies at the University of Alberta, Canada. Her research focuses on the theory and practice of transformative and restorative learning in adult education, adult sustainability and environmental education, social movement learning, socioenvironmental responsibility and work, participatory action research, and pedagogy for social change. She has over twenty-five years of experience as an educator and facilitator in formal education and community and international settings. She was honored with the Graduate Research Award by the Thirty-Seventh Adult Education Research Conference. She is currently working on several transformative learning projects with the immigrant and refugee community, as well as the social work community. Her other publications can be found on her Web page as part of the University of Alberta Web site.
023
Randee Lipson Lawrence, Ed.D, is an associate professor in adult education at National-Louis University in Chicago. Her research interests include extrarational ways of knowing and learning through the arts. She is the editor of Artistic Ways of Knowing: Expanded Opportunities for Teaching and Learning (2005) and the author of several publications that exemplify her practice of incorporating affective, cognitive, somatic, and spiritual dimensions into teaching and learning. She also works with students to use these processes in their research. Among her other research interests and commitments are feminist pedagogy, collaborative inquiry, experiential and transformative learning, arts-based research, dreamwork, photography, and painting.
024
Rod MacLeod is medical director of Hibiscus Coast Hospice; prior to that he was district medical director of palliative care (Waitemata DHB). He is Honorary Clinical Professor in General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland, and adjunct professor in the Departments of General Practice and Medical and Surgical Sciences at University of Otago, Dunedin School of Medicine. He was previously South Link Health Professor in Palliative Care at the Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, and director of palliative care at the Otago Community Hospice. He was associate dean (academic and curriculum) and chair of the Medical Education Group. Prior to this, he was director of palliative care at Mary Potter Hospice in Wellington. He has a long-standing interest in education in palliative care, completing his Ph.D. work in 2002 with a dissertation entitled, “Changing the Way That Doctors Learn to Care for People Who Are Dying.” He has published widely in the area of palliative care in national and international peer-reviewed journals. He is the author of Snapshots on the Journey: An Anthology of Poems Through Death and Remembrance (2002).
025
Terrence E. Maltbia is faculty director of the Columbia Coaching Certification Program, a strategic partnership between the Columbia Business School’s Executive Education Division and the Corporate Learning Solutions Group at Teachers College, Columbia University. He also teaches in the Adult Learning and Leadership Program, Department of Organization at Teachers College. He completed his doctorate at Teachers College. His current research is focused on strategic learning, leadership, organizational and executive coaching, and cultural competence. He recently coauthored A Leader’s Guide to Leveraging Diversity (2009) with Anne Power. Prior to joining Teachers College, he held positions in sales, sales management, corporate employment, organization development, and consulting.
026
Alan Mandell is College Professor of Adult Learning and Mentoring at the State University of New York, Empire State College, where he has been faculty mentor, administrator, and director of the Mentoring Institute for more than thirty years. With colleague Lee Herman, he has written articles and chapters, and the book From Teaching to Mentoring: Principles and Practice, Dialogue and Life in Adult Education (2004). He is also the coauthor (with Elana Michelson) of Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models and Practices (2004).
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Victoria J. Marsick is codirector of the J.M. Huber Institute for Learning in Organizations and professor of adult and organizational learning in the Department of Organization and Leadership, Teachers College, Columbia University. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Her current research, speaking, and consulting are on organizational learning, informal learning, and action learning. She has collaborated with Martha Gephart in developing a framework and instruments to guide system-level learning and change; developed a diagnostic tool for organizational learning with Karen Watkins that has been used in private and nonprofit settings; and worked with Kathleen Dechant and Elizabeth Kasl on a model and diagnostic tool to improve team learning. She recently coauthored Understanding Action Learning (2007) with Judy O’Neil; book chapters and journal articles on informal and incidental learning with Karen Watkins; and Strategic Organizational Learning (forthcoming) with Martha Gephart.
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Susan R. Meyer, president of Life-Work Coach and Susan R. Meyer Coaching and Consulting, focuses on transformative change in individuals and organizations. She works with individuals at midlife, leaders in transition, women seeking empowerment, executive development programs, and change initiatives. Meyer holds a B.A. in English from the State University of New York at Albany, master’s degrees in educational and counseling psychology from New York University, and a doctorate in adult learning from Teachers College, Columbia University. She has written about journaling, coaching, and transformative learning for the Third and Fifth and Sixth International Transformative Learning Conferences. Recent articles include (with Loretta Donovan and Steve Fitzgerald) “Transformative Learning and Appreciative Inquiry: Incorporating Coaching and Action for Deep Organizational Change” in the International Journal for Coaching in Organizations, and (with Loretta Donovan) “Transformative Appreciative Inquiry: The Spiral Architecture of Appreciative Inquiry and Transformative Learning” in Appreciative Inquiry Practitioner.
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Jack Mezirow is Emeritus Professor of Adult and Continuing Education, Teachers College, Columbia University. He introduced the concept of transformative learning to the field of adult education in 1978 in “Perspective Transformation,” published in Adult Education Quarterly. The research base for this concept evolved out of a comprehensive national study of women returning to college. Among his books are Learning as Transformation (with Associates, 2000), Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning (1991), and Fostering Critical Reflection in Adulthood (with Associates, 1990), all published by Jossey-Bass. Mezirow has written several other books, chapters, and articles, and his books on transformative learning have been translated into Greek, German, French, Italian, and Finnish.
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Rebecca Miles is an associate professor in the urban and regional planning program at Florida State University. She has written extensively on environments and health, planning and health and safety, and development and social policy, publishing in social science and public health journals. Her interests range from the sociology of international development (gender, education, and work; empowerment processes at the local and regional scale), to the social and spatial context of health and health behavior, to policy issues in housing and environmental health. She has special interests in the health consequences of substandard housing and poor-quality housing environments; in how social and built environments can enhance quality of life, with a particular focus on low-income communities; and how urban change and development processes affect men and women differently, especially those living in poverty.
Her research also evaluates interventions to address gender inequalities in population health and development.
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Karen Monkman, associate professor at DePaul University, teaches courses in comparative education, social and cultural foundations in education, and qualitative research methods. Her interests span pre-K through university levels, as well as formal, nonformal, and informal education. She writes on social justice and transformation, gender and immigration, and contextual dynamics such as globalization. Her recent publications include, with Pauline Lipman, “Globalization and Social Justice in Education” in William Ayres, Therese Quinn, and David Stovall’s edited Handbook of Social Justice in Education (2008); Globalization and Education: Integration and Contestation Across Cultures (coedited with Nelly P. Stromquist, 2000); “NGOs and Their Impact on Gendered Education,” in Barbara J. Bank, Gender and Education: An Encyclopedia (2007); with Rebecca Miles and Peter Easton, “The Transformatory Potential of a Village Empowerment Program: The Tostan Replication in Mali,” Women’s Studies International Forum (2007); and “Tostan’s Participatory Education Program in Mali,” in Mary Ann Maslak’s Structure and Agency: Engendering Educational Policies, Practices and Programs (2008). She received her Ph.D. from the University of Southern California.
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Nadine Petersen is senior lecturer on the Faculty of Education at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa. Her current research focuses on initial professional education of teachers and service-learning, within a social justice framework. She has published widely in national and international journals and read papers at various national and international conferences in the areas of teaching and learning in higher education, academic staff development, transformative learning, community service in higher education, and service-learning. She is currently coleader of a nationally funded research niche area project, Learning to Be a Teacher, which investigates teacher learning histories and how their histories relate to their practice.
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Ron Sheese is an associate professor of psychology at York University in Toronto, Canada, and associated with the Centre for Academic Writing and the Centre for the Support of Teaching, both of which he has served as director. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Illinois. He is a recipient of the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations Provincial Teaching Award and the Canadian 3M Teaching Fellowship. His research focuses on educational applications of cognitive developmental theory, and he is one of the authors of the book Cognitive Development: Neo-Piagetian Perspectives (2007).
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Regina O. Smith is an assistant professor of adult and continuing education leadership and higher education at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. She teaches courses on adult learning and development, program planning, organizational learning, administrative leadership, serving multicultural and special needs adults, the history and foundations of the Wisconsin Technical College System, the community college, educational dimensions of practice with older adults, urban adult education, administrative leadership, and international adult education. Her primary research interests focus on the psychodynamic aspects of group dynamics, problem-based learning, online learning, and epistemological beliefs. She is also the author of several articles and book chapters on the same topics.
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Edward W. Taylor is an associate professor of adult education at Penn State University-Harrisburg. He received his Ed.D. in adult education from the University of Georgia. His research interests include adult cognition and learning (transformative learning), nonformal education, and medical education. His work has appeared in Adult Education Quarterly, International Journal of Lifelong Education, Studies in the Education of Adults, and other scholarly journals. He recently published an edited book, Teaching for Change: Fostering Transformative Learning in the Classroom. He has been a coeditor of the Adult Education Quarterly since 2006 and an active member of the planning committee for several International Transformative Learning Conferences. Prior to joining the faculty at Penn State, he was a core faculty member at Antioch University for six years. Before his venture into higher education he worked for Eckerd Family Youth Alternatives as a training specialist in Clearwater, Florida.
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Elizabeth J. Tisdell is an associate professor of adult education at Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg. She received her Ed.D. in adult education from the University of Georgia, an M.A. in religion from Fordham University, and a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Maine. Her research interests include spirituality and culture in adult development and adult learning, critical and feminist pedagogy, multicultural issues, and critical media literacy in teaching for diversity in adult education. Her scholarly work has appeared in numerous journals and edited books. Tisdell is the author of Exploring Spirituality and Culture in Adult and Higher Education, based on a research study of a diverse group of adult educators, and is the coeditor and a contributing chapter author of two edited books, Team Teaching and Learning (2000) and Popular Culture, Entertainment Media, and Adult Education (2007). She is currently the coeditor of the journal Adult Education Quarterly. Prior to joining the faculty at Penn State, Tisdell was associate professor of adult and continuing education at National-Louis University in Chicago and on the faculty at Antioch University, Seattle. She worked as a campus minister for the Catholic church from 1979 to 1989 at Central Michigan University and Loyola University, New Orleans.
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Derise E. Tolliver is an associate professor and a member of the resident faculty at DePaul University’s School for New Learning (SNL). She is also the Chicago director of the SNL B.A. Program at Tangaza College in Kenya. Prior to 1995, she was an assistant professor in the Psychology Department and served as the director of assessment and staff psychologist at the DePaul University Community Mental Health Center. As a resident faculty member at SNL, Tolliver functions as a faculty mentor to adult students, advising them and assessing their work as they pursue their individualized competency-based academic programs. In addition, she brings revolutionary activism to her courses by encouraging students to broaden their perspectives and decenter from Eurocentric ways of knowing. Her teaching and scholarship interests include African-centered psychology, spirituality and culture in adult learning, teaching practice, personal and social transformation, travel study, and internationalization of the curriculum. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in clinical psychology from Duke University and her B.A. in psychology from Wellesley College. She is licensed as a clinical psychologist in the state of Illinois.
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Jo A. Tyler is assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg, where she teaches in the M.Ed. program in training and development. A corporate practitioner for twenty-five years, most recently as a vice president of organization and management development at Armstrong World industries, she now consults with organizations interested in the influence and interplay of their stories, storytelling, and organizational narratives. She has published articles and book chapters on storytelling in organizational settings and other topics related to organizational development. She received her Ed.D. from Columbia University in adult education and leadership.
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Judith Kollins Wright is the cultural competency integration specialist at Planned Parenthood of Northeast Ohio in Cleveland, Ohio. She earned a B.S. in education and social policy at Northwestern University and completed an M.Ed. in adult learning and Development at Cleveland State University. With an interest in ethnographic research, she has conducted field research in Chicago, Mexico, Cleveland, and Bolivia. Her research on popular education in Cochabamba, Bolivia, in 2002 has served as the basis for several published articles and presentations.
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Lyle Yorks is associate professor of adult and organizational learning, Teachers College, Columbia University, where he teaches courses in human resource development, strategy development and strategic learning, and research. He is also director of the AEGIS (Adult Education Guided Intensive Study) doctoral program. Yorks has researched and consulted on action learning, collaborative inquiry, staff and executive development issues, and learning transfer with companies around the world. His recent authored and coauthored publications have appeared in the and other professional journals. His recent books include (2004) and (2000). He has earned master’s degrees at Vanderbilt University and Columbia University and his doctoral degree at Columbia.