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Handbook of Catchment Management


Handbook of Catchment Management


2. Aufl.

von: Robert C. Ferrier, Alan Jenkins

142,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 01.07.2021
ISBN/EAN: 9781119531258
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 656

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Beschreibungen

<b>HANDBOOK OF CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT</b> <p>In 2010, the first edition of the <i>Handbook of Catchment Management</i> provided a benchmark on how our understanding and actions in water management within a catchment context had evolved in recent decades. Over ten years on, the catchment management concept is entering a new phase of development aligned to contemporary and future challenges. These include climate change uncertainty, further understanding in ecological functioning under change, the drive for a low-carbon, energy efficient and circular society, multiple uses of water, the emergence of new pollutants of concern, new approaches to valuation, finance and pricing mechanisms, stewardship and community engagement, the integration of water across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and the link between water, energy and food. These developments are framed within an increasingly data rich world where new analytics, sensor technology and processing power are informing increasingly real-time decision making. The challenge is also to increase cross-compliance and policy integration to meet multiple stakeholder objectives, and to link actions to achieve cost-effective outcomes. In addition, there are a number of new and exciting city, region and basin-scale real-world examples of contemporary and new catchment thinking; integrating science, technology, knowledge and governance to address multiple drivers and complex problems from across the globe. The time is now right, to capture the new challenges facing catchment management and water resources management globally.<p>This revised and updated edition of the <i>Handbook of Catchment Management</i> features:<ul><li>Thoroughly rewritten chapters which provide an up-to-date view of catchment management issues and contexts</li><li>New case study material highlighting multi-sectoral management in different globally significant basins and different geographical locations</li><li>Up-to-date topics selected for their resonance not only in natural sciences and engineering, but also in other fields, such as socio-economics, law and policy</li></ul><p>The <i>Handbook</i> is designed for a broad audience, but will be particularly useful for advanced students, researchers, academics and water sector professionals such as planners, consultants and regulators.
<p>List of Contributors xvii</p> <p>Preface xxi</p> <p>Acknowledgements xxiv</p> <p><b>1 Introduction to Catchment Management in 2020 </b><b>3<br /></b><i>Robert C. Ferrier and Alan Jenkins</i></p> <p>1.1 Introduction 3</p> <p>1.2 Historical Synopsis 3</p> <p>1.3 Recent Developments and Emerging Issues 6</p> <p>1.3.1 Value of Water 6</p> <p>1.3.2 Evaluation of the Global Resource 9</p> <p>1.3.3 Water Scarcity and Drought 11</p> <p>1.3.4 Emerging Technologies 14</p> <p>1.3.5 Energy Transition 15</p> <p>1.3.6 Water Quality 15</p> <p>1.4 Policy Development 17</p> <p>1.5 Working with Nature, Natural Capital, and Ecosystem Services 18</p> <p>1.6 Summary 19</p> <p>References 20</p> <p><b>2 Water Diplomacy </b><b>25<br /></b><i>Rozemarijn ter Horst </i>25</p> <p>2.1 Introduction 25</p> <p>2.2 Short Historical Synopsis 26</p> <p>2.2.1 What Is Water Diplomacy? 27</p> <p>2.2.2 Water conflict and cooperation 28</p> <p>2.3 Current Solutions 28</p> <p>2.3.1 Who Practises Water Diplomacy? 28</p> <p>2.3.2 How Is Water Diplomacy Done? 31</p> <p>2.4 New Insights 37</p> <p>2.5 Future Knowledge Requirements 38</p> <p>References 39</p> <p><b>3 Water Financing and Pricing Mechanisms </b><b>47<br /></b><i>Alan D. A. Sutherland and Colin McNaughton</i></p> <p>3.1 Introduction 47</p> <p>3.2 Short Historical Synopsis 49</p> <p>3.3 Current Solutions 52</p> <p>3.3.1 Regulation by Contract (Franchise Regulation) 53</p> <p>3.3.2 Rate of Return Regulation 53</p> <p>3.3.3 Incentive-Based Regulation 54</p> <p>3.3.4 The Regulatory Governance Framework 58</p> <p>3.4 New Insights 60</p> <p>3.5 Future Knowledge Requirements 64</p> <p>References 65</p> <p><b>4 Defining ‘Smart Water’ </b><b>67<br /></b><i>David Lloyd Owen</i></p> <p>4.1 Introduction 67</p> <p>4.2 Historical Synopsis 69</p> <p>4.3 Current Solutions 72</p> <p>4.4 New Insights – The Digital Disruption 73</p> <p>4.4.1 Adopting New Technologies 73</p> <p>4.4.2 Decarbonising Water and Wastewater as a Resource 75</p> <p>4.4.3 Water and Sewerage Metering 76</p> <p>4.4.4 Demand Management, Tariffs, and Smarter White Goods 77</p> <p>4.4.5 Sensors 78</p> <p>4.4.6 ‘Digital’ Water 79</p> <p>4.4.7 Rural–Urban Interface (New Storage and Green Infiltration) 82</p> <p>4.5 Future Knowledge Requirements 84</p> <p>4.6 Discussion and Conclusions 86</p> <p>References 87</p> <p><b>5 Water, Food, and Energy Nexus </b><b>93<br /></b><i>Alex Smajgl</i></p> <p>5.1 Introduction 93</p> <p>5.2 Historical Synopsis 94</p> <p>5.2.1 Nexus Conceptualisations 94</p> <p>5.2.2 Nexus-Focused Research 96</p> <p>5.2.3 Nexus-Type Implementations and Case Studies 97</p> <p>5.2.4 Nexus Interactions and Trade-off Examples 98</p> <p>5.2.4.1 Hydropower – Fish 98</p> <p>5.2.4.2 Irrigation – Food Crops – Energy Crops 99</p> <p>5.2.4.3 Energy Pricing – Irrigated Agriculture – Availability of Surface and Groundwater 99</p> <p>5.2.4.4 Desalinisation – Energy Costs – Water Supply 100</p> <p>5.3 Current Solutions 100</p> <p>5.3.1 Sustainability and Nexus Outcomes 100</p> <p>5.3.2 Different Types of Water 102</p> <p>5.3.3 Intervention Points to ‘Manage the Nexus’ 103</p> <p>5.3.4 Research Solutions for Improved Trade-off Assessments 104</p> <p>5.3.5 Innovative Engagement Processes to Steer Cross-Sector Dialogue 108</p> <p>5.4 New Insights 110</p> <p>5.5 Future Knowledge Requirements 112</p> <p>References 114</p> <p><b>6 Groundwater Management </b><b>125<br /></b><i>Stephen Foster and Alan MacDonald</i></p> <p>6.1 Introduction 125</p> <p>6.1.1 Importance of Groundwater Storage 125</p> <p>6.1.2 Dynamics of Groundwater Flow Systems 126</p> <p>6.1.3 Evaluation of Groundwater Recharge 128</p> <p>6.1.4 Processes of Groundwater Quality Degradation 129</p> <p>6.1.5 Aquifer Pollution Vulnerability and Quality Protection 132</p> <p>6.2 Groundwater Management – Needs and Approaches 133</p> <p>6.2.1 Impacts of Groundwater Resource Development 133</p> <p>6.2.2 Surface-Water Impacts of Ineffective Management 135</p> <p>6.2.3 Key Components of Groundwater Resources Management 135</p> <p>6.2.3.1 Demand vs. Supply Side Interventions 135</p> <p>6.2.3.2 Identifying Links with the Rest of the Water Cycle 136</p> <p>6.2.3.3 Climate Change 137</p> <p>6.2.3.4 Irrigation 137</p> <p>6.2.4 Approaches to Groundwater Quality Protection 138</p> <p>6.2.4.1 Potential Polluter Pays for Protection 138</p> <p>6.2.4.2 Groundwater-Friendly Rural Land Use 139</p> <p>6.2.5 Need for Adaptive and Precautionary Management 140</p> <p>6.3 New Insights 140</p> <p>6.3.1 Evolving Paradigm of Sound Governance 140</p> <p>6.3.2 Integrated Policy to Strengthen Governance 142</p> <p>6.3.2.1 Vertical Integration Within the Water Sector 142</p> <p>6.3.2.2 Horizontal Integration Beyond the Water Sector 143</p> <p>6.3.3 Conjunctive Use of Groundwater and Surface Water 143</p> <p>6.3.4 Groundwater Management Planning 145</p> <p>Acknowledgements 148</p> <p>References 149</p> <p><b>7 Diffuse Pollution Management </b><b>153<br /></b><i>Andrew Vinten</i></p> <p>7.1 Introduction 153</p> <p>7.1.1 Attributes of Diffuse Pollution 154</p> <p>7.2 Historical synopsis: Challenges for diffuse pollution management 155</p> <p>7.2.1 Recognition of Diffuse Pollution as an Issue 155</p> <p>7.2.2 Identification of Sources of Diffuse Pollution 159</p> <p>7.2.3 Development of Programmes of Measures to Combat Diffuse Pollution 161</p> <p>7.3 Current solutions 162</p> <p>7.3.1 Evidence of Effectiveness of Measures 162</p> <p>7.3.2 Appropriateness of Measures in Specific Contexts 166</p> <p>7.3.3 The Role of Governance and Other Factors in Effecting Behaviour Change 167</p> <p>7.4 A Way Forward? 169</p> <p>References 174</p> <p><b>8 Emerging Contaminants and Pollutants of Concern </b><b>183<br /></b><i>Pei Wang and Yonglong Lu</i></p> <p>8.1 Introduction 183</p> <p>8.2 Short Historical Synopsis 186</p> <p>8.2.1 Pollution Pathways 186</p> <p>8.2.2 Life Cycle Analysis 188</p> <p>8.2.3 Flows in Waste Management 189</p> <p>8.2.4 Storage in the Environment 189</p> <p>8.2.5 Alternatives or Mitigation Technologies for PFOA/PFO 190</p> <p>8.3 Current Solutions 190</p> <p>8.4 New Insights 191</p> <p>8.4.1 Multi‐contaminants: Improved Risk Ranking 191</p> <p>8.4.2 Heavy Metals 191</p> <p>8.4.3 Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 193</p> <p>8.4.4 Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products 194</p> <p>8.4.5 Persistent Organic Pollutants 194</p> <p>8.4.6 What Is the Balance of the Cost from Production, Monitoring to Remediation of Emerging Pollutants? 196</p> <p>8.4.7 What Is the Balance of the Attitude Among Different Stakeholders Including Government, Industry, Academia, and Public? 197</p> <p>8.4.8 Government 197</p> <p>8.4.9 Industry 198</p> <p>8.4.10 Academia 199</p> <p>8.4.11 Public 199</p> <p>8.5 Future Knowledge Requirements 199</p> <p>8.5.1 Regulations on the Production‐Demand Chain to Help Develop Low‐Toxicity Substitutes 199</p> <p>8.5.2 Highly Efficient Methods to Remove the Pollutants in Various Wastes 200</p> <p>8.5.3 Develop Specific Criteria and Standards for More Effective Risk Assessment and Environmental Management 200</p> <p>8.5.4 Ecosystem‐Based Management for Prevention from Environmental Impacts of Emerging Pollutants 201</p> <p>References 201</p> <p><b>9 Flood Management </b><b>205<br /></b><i>Mark Fletcher</i></p> <p>9.1 Introduction 205</p> <p>9.1.1 The Water Cycle and Flooding 205</p> <p>9.2 Historical Synopsis and Current Understanding 208</p> <p>9.2.1 Flood Warning 208</p> <p>9.2.2 UK Overview 208</p> <p>9.2.3 Legislative Framework 209</p> <p>9.2.4 Resilience to Flooding 209</p> <p>9.2.5 Flood Categorisation 210</p> <p>9.3 Current Solutions 213</p> <p>9.3.1 Coping with Extreme Flooding 213</p> <p>9.3.2 How to Cope (in Advance of a Major Flood Event) 213</p> <p>9.3.3 Flood Asset Management 214</p> <p>9.4 New Insights 214</p> <p>9.4.1 Case Studies: (A) Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme, Leeds, UK 214</p> <p>9.4.1.1 Scheme Development 214</p> <p>9.4.1.2 Digital Construction and Collaboration 215</p> <p>9.4.1.3 Replacing the Weirs 215</p> <p>9.4.1.4 Linear Defences in the City Centre 216</p> <p>9.4.1.5 Eliminating Another Barrier 216</p> <p>9.4.1.6 Integrated Urban Drainage Model 216</p> <p>9.4.1.7 The Cutting Edge 216</p> <p>9.4.2 Case Studies: (B) Skipton Flood Alleviation Scheme, Skipton, UK 221</p> <p>9.4.2.1 The Short- and Long-Term Benefits from a Sustainable Development Perspective 224</p> <p>9.4.2.2 Economic Benefits 224</p> <p>9.4.2.3 Environmental Benefits 225</p> <p>9.4.2.4 Social Benefits 225</p> <p>9.4.2.5 Cutting Edge Aspects 225</p> <p>9.4.2.6 Transferability – A Model for Work Elsewhere 226</p> <p>9.4.2.7 Planning Impact on the Scheme 227</p> <p>9.4.2.8 The Role of SMART Design in Flood Management 228</p> <p>9.4.2.9 SMART Control 229</p> <p>9.4.2.10 Automatic PLC Control 230</p> <p>9.4.2.11 3D Modelling 230</p> <p>9.4.3 Case Studies: (C) Connswater Community Greenway, Belfast, UK 233</p> <p>9.4.4 Case Studies: (D) Freckleton Floodbank Breach, River Ribble, Lancashire, UK 233</p> <p>9.4.4.1 Introduction 233</p> <p>9.4.4.2 Possible Reasons for the Failure of the Embankment 237</p> <p>9.4.4.3 Good Working Practice 239</p> <p>9.5 Future Challenges 241</p> <p>9.5.1 Climate Change – A Global Perspective 241</p> <p>9.5.2 Population and Urbanisation 242</p> <p>9.5.3 Digital 242</p> <p>9.5.4 Nature Based Solutions (NBS) 242</p> <p>References 243</p> <p><b>10 Ecological Restoration </b><b>245<br /></b><i>Laurence Carvalho, Iain D. M. Gunn, Bryan M. Spears, and Anne J. Dobel</i></p> <p>10.1 Introduction 245</p> <p>10.2 Short Historical Synopsis 246</p> <p>10.2.1 Restoration Success (or Lack of It) 246</p> <p>10.2.2 Timescales in Ecological Recovery 249</p> <p>10.3 Target-Setting, Monitoring, and Assessment 250</p> <p>10.4 Current Restoration Approaches 250</p> <p>10.4.1 Rivers 251</p> <p>10.4.2 Environmental Flows 252</p> <p>10.4.3 Lakes 254</p> <p>10.4.3.1 Biomanipulation 255</p> <p>10.4.3.2 Artificial Mixing and Aeration 256</p> <p>10.4.3.3 Chemical Treatment 256</p> <p>10.4.3.4 Sediment Removal 257</p> <p>10.4.3.5 Short-Term Mitigation of Harmful Algal Blooms – Poorly Evidenced Lake Restoration Methods 257</p> <p>10.4.4 Ponds 258</p> <p>10.5 New Insights, Innovation, and Knowledge Gaps 259</p> <p>10.5.1 Circular Economies – Resource Recovery 259</p> <p>10.5.2 Nature-Based Solutions and Payment for Ecosystem Services 260</p> <p>10.5.3 Building Climate Change Resilience 260</p> <p>10.5.4 Developing a Systemic Approach and Re-wilding 262</p> <p>References 263</p> <p><b>11 Water, Sanitation, and Health: Progress and Obstacles to Achieving the SDGs </b><b>271<br /></b><i>Emmanuel M. Akpabio and John S. Rowan</i></p> <p>11.1 Introduction 271</p> <p>11.2 Theoretical and Historical Basis of Water, Sanitation, and Health Nexus 273</p> <p>11.3 Understanding Current WaSH Management Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case of Nigeria and Malawi 278</p> <p>11.4 Understanding the Challenges Associated with Achieving Improved WaSH Services Delivery for Sub-Saharan Africa 296</p> <p>11.5 Key Insights, Lessons, and Future Knowledge 299</p> <p>11.5.1 A Lack of Nexus Approach 300</p> <p>11.5.2 Governance Challenge and Poor Institutional Capacities 301</p> <p>11.5.3 Cultural and Religious Values 301</p> <p>11.5.4 Excessive Influence of External Actors and Agencies 303</p> <p>11.5.5 Prioritising and Strengthening Catchment-Based Management Approach to WaSH Services Delivery 303</p> <p>11.5.6 Climate Change Impact and Access to Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene 304</p> <p>Acknowledgements 305</p> <p>References 305</p> <p><b>12 The Legal and Institutional Framework for Basin Management Across Governance Levels </b><b>309<br /></b><i>Susanne Schmeier</i></p> <p>12.1 Introduction 309</p> <p>12.2 The Conceptual Framework – Legal and Institutional Dimensions of River Basin Management 311</p> <p>12.2.1 From Local to Transboundary – A Level Perspective on River Basin Management 311</p> <p>12.2.2 The River Basin Management Cycle 314</p> <p>12.2.3 Combining the Level and the Cyclical Approach 315</p> <p>12.3 From Concept to Practice – The (Mal-)Functioning of Legal and Institutional Frameworks 316</p> <p>12.3.1 River Basin Management in Europe – High Complexity 316</p> <p>12.3.1.1 The Rhine River Basin – A High Density of Legal and Institutional Instruments 316</p> <p>12.3.1.2 The Danube River Basin – Complex Management Mechanisms for a Complex Basin 321</p> <p>12.3.2 River Basin Management Across Levels in the Mekong River Basin – A Patchy Framework 323</p> <p>12.3.3 River Basin Management in Southern Africa – Increasing Integration in the Orange River Basin 327</p> <p>12.4 Conclusions 331</p> <p>References 332</p> <p><b>13 Scotland the ‘Hydro Nation’: Linking Policy, Science, Industry, Regulation in Scotland and Internationally 339<br /></b><i>Barry Greig and Jon Rathjen</i></p> <p>13.1 Introduction 339</p> <p>13.2 Scotland’s Water Environment 339</p> <p>13.3 Industry Vision 341</p> <p>13.4 Scotland: The Hydro Nation 341</p> <p>13.5 Value 343</p> <p>13.6 Hydro Nation: Strategy and Structure 343</p> <p>13.7 Hydro Nation Strategy: National Theme 346</p> <p>13.8 Water Supply and Demand Management 347</p> <p>13.9 Private Supplies and Rural Provision 347</p> <p>13.10 Regulation and Governance 348</p> <p>13.11 Hydro Nation Strategy: International Theme 349</p> <p>13.12 Scotland and Malawi 350</p> <p>13.13 Hydro Nation Strategy: Knowledge Theme 352</p> <p>13.14 Hydro Nation Strategy: Innovation Theme 352</p> <p>13.15 Hydro Nation Impact 353</p> <p>13.16 Emerging Policy Issues for Scotland 355</p> <p>References 357</p> <p><b>14 Yorkshire Integrated Catchment Solutions Programme (iCASP): A New Model for Research-Based Catchment Management 359<br /></b><i>Janet C. Richardson, Marie Ferré, Benjamin L. Rabb, Jennifer C. Armstrong, Julia Martin-Ortega, David M. Hodgson, Thomas D. M Willis, Richard Grayson, Poppy Leeder, and Joseph Holden</i></p> <p>14.1 Introduction 359</p> <p>14.2 Study Area: River Ouse Drainage Basin, Yorkshire 360</p> <p>14.2.1 Catchment Challenges 361</p> <p>14.3 The iCASP Model 364</p> <p>14.3.1 Partnership Working 364</p> <p>14.3.2 Principles of Working 369</p> <p>14.3.3 Project Development Process 369</p> <p>14.3.3.1 Outputs 373</p> <p>14.3.4 Impact Tracking 374</p> <p>14.3.5 The Network 376</p> <p>14.4 New Insights and Highlights 376</p> <p>14.5 Conclusions 380</p> <p>Acknowledgements 380</p> <p>References 380</p> <p><b>15 Integrated Management in Singapore 385<br /></b><i>Cecilia Tortajada and Rachel Yan Ting Koh</i></p> <p>15.1 Introduction 385</p> <p>15.2 Institutional and Legal Frameworks 386</p> <p>15.3 Overall Policy and Planning 388</p> <p>15.4 The Search for Alternative Sources of Water 389</p> <p>15.5 NEWater: From Concept to Implementation 393</p> <p>15.6 NEWater: Water Source Looking to the Future 396</p> <p>15.7 Final Thoughts: Public Engagement, Education, and Outreach Strategies to Promote Acceptance 400</p> <p>References 401</p> <p><b>16 Flood and Drought Emergency Management 409<br /></b><i>Miaomiao Ma and Song Han</i></p> <p>16.1 Severe Flooding on the Huai River in 2007 409</p> <p>16.1.1 Introduction 409</p> <p>16.1.2 Background Hydrological Situation 409</p> <p>16.1.3 Challenges 412</p> <p>16.1.4 Current Approach to Meeting the Challenges 413</p> <p>16.1.5 Lessons Learned 414</p> <p>16.1.5.1 Leave the Flood More Space 414</p> <p>16.1.5.2 Optimise Flood Control Regulations 415</p> <p>16.1.5.3 Moderating Flood Risks 415</p> <p>16.1.6 Future Work 415</p> <p>16.2 Severe Drought in South-west Region of China in 2010 416</p> <p>16.2.1 Introduction and Background 416</p> <p>16.2.2 Challenges 418</p> <p>16.2.3 Current Approach to Meeting the Challenges 420</p> <p>16.2.4 Recovery After the Drought Event 423</p> <p>16.2.5 Lessons Learned 424</p> <p>16.2.6 Future Work 426</p> <p>References 426</p> <p><b>17 The River Chief System in China 429<br /></b><i>Tan Xianqiang</i></p> <p>17.1 Introduction 429</p> <p>17.1.1 Components of the RCS 430</p> <p>17.2 Short Historical Synopsis 432</p> <p>17.3 Current Solutions 433</p> <p>17.3.1 RCS on the Chishui River as a Demonstration 433</p> <p>17.3.2 New Insights 434</p> <p>17.4 Future Knowledge Requirements 438</p> <p>Acknowledgement 439</p> <p><b>18 Water Resources Management in the Colorado River Basin 441<br /></b><i>Alan Butler, Terrance Fulp, James Prairie, and Amy Witherall</i></p> <p>18.1 Introduction and Background 441</p> <p>18.1.1 Geography and Hydrology 442</p> <p>18.1.2 Legal and Policy Framework 444</p> <p>18.2 Current Challenge – Imbalance of Water Supply and Demand 450</p> <p>18.3 Recent Approaches to Meeting Challenges 452</p> <p>18.3.1 The Collaborative, Incremental Approach 452</p> <p>18.3.2 Interim Surplus Guidelines and California ‘4.4 Plan’ 453</p> <p>18.3.3 2007 Interim Guidelines 455</p> <p>18.3.4 Minutes 319 and 323 455</p> <p>18.3.5 Drought Contingency Plans in the United States and Mexico 457</p> <p>18.3.6 Reclamation’s Role 458</p> <p>18.4 Future Thoughts and Considerations 459</p> <p>References 460</p> <p><b>19 Development in the Northern Rivers of Australia 465<br /></b><i>Ian Watson, Andrew Ash, Cuan Petheram, Marcus Barber, and Chris Stokes</i></p> <p>19.1 Introduction 465</p> <p>19.2 Context for Northern Development 468</p> <p>19.3 Biophysical Characteristics and Constraints 475</p> <p>19.3.1 Physiography, Climate, and Hydrology 476</p> <p>19.3.1.1 Surface Water – Groundwater Connectivity 478</p> <p>19.3.2 Environment and Ecology 480</p> <p>19.3.3 Potential Impacts and Their Management 481</p> <p>19.4 Catchment Governance and Management 483</p> <p>19.4.1 Roles and Responsibilities of Government in Managing Catchments 483</p> <p>19.4.2 Commonwealth Government 483</p> <p>19.4.3 State and Territory Government 484</p> <p>19.4.4 Statutory Bodies with a Role in Catchment Management 485</p> <p>19.4.5 Community Organisations, Emerging Voices 485</p> <p>19.4.6 The Role of Indigenous People in Catchment Management 485</p> <p>19.4.7 Development Agendas and the Protection of the Natural and Cultural Values of Northern Australian Rivers 486</p> <p>19.5 Development Opportunities 487</p> <p>19.5.1 Background 487</p> <p>19.5.2 Land and Water Resources 487</p> <p>19.5.2.1 Soils and Land Suitability 487</p> <p>19.5.2.2 Surface and Groundwater 488</p> <p>19.5.3 Primary Production Opportunities 488</p> <p>19.6 Conclusions 489</p> <p>Acknowledgements 490</p> <p>References 490</p> <p><b>20 Catchment Management of Lake Simcoe, Canada 499<br /></b><i>Jill C. Crossman</i></p> <p>20.1 Introduction to the Lake Simcoe Case Study: A History of Problems 499</p> <p>20.2 History of Pollution 501</p> <p>20.2.1 Point Sources 502</p> <p>20.2.2 Diffuse Sources 502</p> <p>20.2.3 Direct Sources to the Lake 505</p> <p>20.3 History of Management of Lake Simcoe 506</p> <p>20.3.1 Implementation of Catchment Management Principles 507</p> <p>20.4 Management Achievements 510</p> <p>20.4.1 Reductions in Phosphorus Loadings 510</p> <p>20.4.2 Point Source Reductions – Sewage Treatment 511</p> <p>20.4.3 Diffuse Source Reductions 512</p> <p>20.4.4 Septic Systems 512</p> <p>20.4.5 Urban Run-off 513</p> <p>20.4.6 Fertilisers 515</p> <p>20.4.7 Livestock 516</p> <p>20.4.8 Soil Erosion 516</p> <p>20.4.9 Wetland Drainage (Polders) 517</p> <p>20.4.10 Improvements in Lake Water Quality 518</p> <p>20.4.11 Management Impacts on Fish Stocks 520</p> <p>20.5 Future Implications 522</p> <p>20.5.1 Land Use and Population Change 522</p> <p>20.5.2 Climate Change 524</p> <p>20.6 Conclusion 526</p> <p>References 527</p> <p><b>21 Management of Water Resources on the Han River, Korea 533<br /></b><i>Hwirin Kim</i></p> <p>21.1 Introduction 533</p> <p>21.2 Short Historical Synopsis 535</p> <p>21.2.1 Dams, Weirs, Reservoirs, and Related Institutions in the Han River Basin 535</p> <p>21.2.2 The Dam and Weir Conjunctive Operation Council 538</p> <p>21.3 Current Issues 539</p> <p>21.3.1 Flooding in 2006 539</p> <p>21.3.2 Drought in 2016–2018 542</p> <p>21.3.3 Dam Water Use for River Water Quality Improvement-2018 543</p> <p>21.4 Future Challenges 546</p> <p><b>22 Dispute Resolution in the Cauvery Basin, India 549<br /></b><i>Neha Khandekar and Veena Srinivasan</i></p> <p>22.1 Introduction 549</p> <p>22.1.1 Background 549</p> <p>22.1.2 The Cauvery Water Conflict 552</p> <p>22.2 History of the Dispute 553</p> <p>22.2.1 Colonial Times 553</p> <p>22.2.2 Post‐independence Origins of Inter‐State Dispute (1974–1990) 555</p> <p>22.2.3 Tribunal Process (1990–2007) 555</p> <p>22.2.4 Different States Have Different Positions About Principles 556</p> <p>22.2.4.1 Karnataka’s Position 556</p> <p>22.2.4.2 Tamil Nadu’s Position 557</p> <p>22.2.5 2007 Agreement 558</p> <p>22.2.5.1 Principles of Allocation 558</p> <p>22.2.5.2 Surface Water Allocation 558</p> <p>22.2.5.3 Groundwater Allocation 558</p> <p>22.2.5.4 Environmental Flow 560</p> <p>22.2.5.5 Release Schedule 560</p> <p>22.2.6 Post‐tribunal Conflicts (2007–2018) 561</p> <p>22.2.7 The 2018 Verdict 561</p> <p>22.3 Analysis of the Cauvery Dispute 562</p> <p>22.3.1 Problems with Scientific Basis of Tribunal Allocation 563</p> <p>22.3.1.1 Premise of Allocation Is Flawed 563</p> <p>22.3.1.2 No Guidance on Shortage Sharing in Drought Years 564</p> <p>22.3.1.3 No Clarity on Wastewater Ownership 564</p> <p>22.3.2 Data Gaps 564</p> <p>22.3.2.1 Sparse Data on Water Availability 564</p> <p>22.3.2.2 Inconsistent and Inadequate Data on Agricultural Water Use 565</p> <p>22.3.2.3 Data on ‘Green Water’ and Evapotranspiration Is Unavailable 565</p> <p>22.3.2.4 Data on Urban Water Use Is Fragmented 566</p> <p>22.3.2.5 Inadequate Public Information on Water Infrastructure Plans 566</p> <p>22.3.2.6 Missing Data on Water Infrastructure Operations 566</p> <p>22.3.2.7 Reservoir Sedimentation Is Not Accounted for 566</p> <p>22.3.2.8 Water Quality Data Are Inadequate 567</p> <p>22.4 Science–Policy Gaps 567</p> <p>22.4.1 Changing Nature of Demand and Supply 568</p> <p>22.5 Political Challenges 569</p> <p>22.5.1 Identity Politics 569</p> <p>22.5.2 Poor Public Communication 569</p> <p>22.6 Dispute Resolution Approaches 569</p> <p>22.6.1 Cauvery Management Board 570</p> <p>22.6.2 Direct Dialogue 571</p> <p>22.7 Summary and Way Forward 571</p> <p>Acknowledgements 573</p> <p>References 573</p> <p><b>23 The Future for Catchment Management 579<br /></b><i>Alan Jenkins and Robert C. Ferrier</i></p> <p>23.1 Climate Change 579</p> <p>23.2 Biodiversity 580</p> <p>23.3 Land Use 581</p> <p>23.4 Coasts 582</p> <p>23.5 Ecosystem Goods and Services 582</p> <p>23.6 People and Management 583</p> <p>23.7 Science 584</p> <p>23.8 Challenges for the Next Decade 585</p> <p>References 585</p> <p>Index 589</p>
<p><b>About the Editors</b> <p><b>Robert C. Ferrier </b>is Director of the Centre of Expertise for Waters (CREW) at the Hydro Nation International Centre, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, Scotland. <p><b>Alan Jenkins</b> is Deputy Director and Director of Science at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, UK.
<p>In 2010, the first edition of the <i>Handbook of Catchment Management</i> provided a benchmark on how our understanding and actions in water management within a catchment context had evolved in recent decades. Over ten years on, the catchment management concept is entering a new phase of development aligned to contemporary and future challenges. These include climate change uncertainty, further understanding in ecological functioning under change, the drive for a low-carbon, energy efficient and circular society, multiple uses of water, the emergence of new pollutants of concern, new approaches to valuation, finance and pricing mechanisms, stewardship and community engagement, the integration of water across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and the link between water, energy and food. These developments are framed within an increasingly data rich world where new analytics, sensor technology and processing power are informing increasingly real-time decision making. The challenge is also to increase cross-compliance and policy integration to meet multiple stakeholder objectives, and to link actions to achieve cost-effective outcomes. In addition, there are a number of new and exciting city, region and basin-scale real-world examples of contemporary and new catchment thinking; integrating science, technology, knowledge and governance to address multiple drivers and complex problems from across the globe. The time is now right, to capture the new challenges facing catchment management and water resources management globally. <p>This revised and updated edition of the <i>Handbook of Catchment Management</i> features: <ul><li>Thoroughly rewritten chapters which provide an up-to-date view of catchment management issues and contexts</li> <li>New case study material highlighting multi-sectoral management in different globally significant basins and different geographical locations</li> <li>Up-to-date topics selected for their resonance not only in natural sciences and engineering, but also in other fields, such as socio-economics, law and policy</li></ul> <p>The <i>Handbook</i> is designed for a broad audience, but will be particularly useful for advanced students, researchers, academics and water sector professionals such as planners, consultants and regulators.

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