Details

Handbook of Aggregation-Induced Emission, Volume 1


Handbook of Aggregation-Induced Emission, Volume 1

Tutorial Lectures and Mechanism Studies
1. Aufl.

von: Youhong Tang, Ben Zhong Tang

183,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 04.04.2022
ISBN/EAN: 9781119642893
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 496

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Beschreibungen

<p><b>The first volume of the ultimate reference on the science and applications of aggregation-induced emission </b></p> <p><i>The Handbook of Aggregation-Induced Emission</i> explores foundational and advanced topics in aggregation-induced emission, as well as cutting-edge developments in the field, celebrating twenty years of progress and achievement in this important and interdisciplinary field. The three volumes combine to offer readers a comprehensive and insightful interpretation accessible to both new and experienced researchers working on aggregation-induced emission. </p> <p>In this first volume of three, the editors survey the subject of  aggregation-induced emission with a focus on the fundamentals of various branches of the discipline, such as crystallization-induced emission, room temperature phosphorescence, aggregation-induced delayed fluorescence, and more. This book covers the new properties of materials endowed by molecular aggregates. It also includes:  </p> <ul> <li>A thorough introduction to the mechanistic understanding of the importance of molecular motion to aggregation-induced emission </li> <li>An exploration of the aggregation-induced emission mechanism at the molecular level </li> <li>Practical discussions of aggregation-induced emission from the restriction of double bond rotation at the excited state, and clusterization-triggered emission </li> </ul> <p>Perfect for academic researchers working on aggregation-induced emission, this set of volumes is also ideal for professionals and students in the fields of photophysics, photochemistry, materials science, optoelectronic materials, synthetic organic chemistry, macromolecular chemistry, polymer science, and biological sciences. </p>
<p>List of Contributors xv</p> <p>Preface to Handbook of Aggregation-Induced Emission xxi</p> <p>Preface to Volume 1: Fundamentals xxiii</p> <p><b>1 The Mechanistic Understanding of the Importance of Molecular Motions to Aggregation-induced Emission 1<br /></b><i>Junkai Liu and Ben Zhong Tang</i></p> <p>1.1 Introduction 1</p> <p>1.2 Restriction of Intramolecular Motion 2</p> <p>1.2.1 Restriction of Intramolecular Rotation 3</p> <p>1.2.2 Restriction of Intramolecular Vibration 4</p> <p>1.2.3 Ultrafast Insights into Tetraphenylethylene Derivatives 6</p> <p>1.2.4 Theoretical Insights into Restriction of Intramolecular Motion 8</p> <p>1.3 Restricted Access to Conical Intersection 12</p> <p>1.4 Restriction of Access to the Dark State 14</p> <p>1.5 Suppression of Kasha’s Rule 15</p> <p>1.6 Through Space Conjugation 17</p> <p>1.6.1 Clusterization-Triggered Emission 18</p> <p>1.6.2 Polymerization-induced Emission 19</p> <p>1.6.3 Excited-state Through-space Conjugation 19</p> <p>1.7 Perspective 21</p> <p>References 23</p> <p><b>2 Understanding the AIE Mechanism at the Molecular Level </b><b>27<br /></b><i>Xiaoyan Zheng and Qian Peng</i></p> <p>2.1 Introduction 27</p> <p>2.2 Theoretical Methods 28</p> <p>2.2.1 Radiative and Nonradiative Rate Constants 28</p> <p>2.2.2 Computational Details 29</p> <p>2.3 Revealed AIE Mechanism 31</p> <p>2.3.1 Rotating Vibrations of Intramolecular Aromatic Ring 31</p> <p>2.3.2 Stretching Vibrations of Bonds 33</p> <p>2.3.3 Bending Vibration of Bonds 34</p> <p>2.3.4 Flipping Vibrations of Molecular Skeletons 35</p> <p>2.3.5 Twisting Vibration of Molecular Skeletons 36</p> <p>2.4 Visualize Calculated Parameters in Experiments 37</p> <p>2.4.1 Stokes Shift vs Reorganization Energy 37</p> <p>2.4.2 Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RSS) vs Reorganization Energy 38</p> <p>2.4.3 Isotope Effect vs DRE 40</p> <p>2.4.4 Linear Relationship between Fluorescence Intensity and Amorphous Aggregate Size 42</p> <p>2.4.5 Pressure-induced Enhanced Emission (PIEE) 44</p> <p>2.5 Molecular Design Based on AIE Mechanism 45</p> <p>2.6 Summary and Outlook 46</p> <p>Acknowledgments 48</p> <p>References 48</p> <p><b>3 Aggregation-induced Emission from the Restriction of Double Bond Rotation at the Excited State </b><b>55<br /></b><i>Ming Hu and Yan-Song Zheng</i></p> <p>3.1 Introduction 55</p> <p>3.2 AIE Phenomena and Applications from RDBR Mechanism 58</p> <p>3.2.1 Evolvement and Development of AIE Mechanisms 58</p> <p>3.2.2 Investigation of RDBR AIE Mechanism by <i>E/Z </i>isomerization 64</p> <p>3.2.3 Investigating of RDBR AIE Mechanism by Immobilization of TPE Propeller-like Conformation 69</p> <p>3.2.4 Research of Theoretical Calculation on RDBR 78</p> <p>3.2.5 Other AIEgens Involving RBDR Process 84</p> <p>3.3 Conclusions 93</p> <p>References 94</p> <p><b>4 The Expansion of AIE Thought: From Single Molecule to Molecular Uniting </b><b>99<br /></b><i>Qiuyan Liao, Qianqian Li, and Zhen Li</i></p> <p>4.1 Aggregation-Induced Emission 99</p> <p>4.2 Photoluminescence Materials Based on Molecular Set 101</p> <p>4.3 Mechanoluminescence Materials Based on Molecular Set 106</p> <p>4.3.1 Mechanoluminescence Materials with Fluorescence Emission 106</p> <p>4.3.2 Mechanoluminescence Materials with Mechanical Induced Dual-or Tri-color Emission 115</p> <p>4.3.3 Quantitative Research of Mechanoluminescence Property 121</p> <p>4.4 Mechanochromism Materials 122</p> <p>4.4.1 Mechanochromism Materials Based on Polymorphs 122</p> <p>4.4.2 Mechanochromism Materials Based on Excimer Emission 125</p> <p>4.4.3 Other Kinds of Mechanochromism Materials 128</p> <p>4.5 Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials Based on Molecular Uniting 131</p> <p>4.5.1 Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials with Aromatics 131</p> <p>4.5.2 Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials with Simple or Nonaromatic Structure 140</p> <p>4.5.3 Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials with Multiple Emission 142</p> <p>4.5.4 Photoinduced Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials 144</p> <p>4.6 Conclusion and Perspectives 147</p> <p>References 147</p> <p><b>5 Clusterization-Triggered Emission </b><b>153<br /></b><i>Haoke Zhang and Ben Zhong Tang</i></p> <p>5.1 Introduction 153</p> <p>5.2 Pure <i>n</i>-Electron Systems 156</p> <p>5.3 Pure <i>π</i>-Electron Systems 160</p> <p>5.4 (<i>n</i>, <i>π</i>)-Electrons Systems 164</p> <p>5.5 Other Systems 166</p> <p>5.6 Summary 167</p> <p>References 168</p> <p><b>6 Crystallization-induced Emission Enhancement </b><b>177<br /></b><i>Yong Qiang Dong, Yingying Liu, Mengyang Liu, Qian Wang, and Kang Wang</i></p> <p>6.1 Introduction 177</p> <p>6.2 Tetraphenylethylene Derivatives 178</p> <p>6.3 CIEE Active Luminogens with Bulky Conjugation Core 183</p> <p>6.3.1 Dibenzofulvene (DBF) Derivatives (Chart 6.2) 183</p> <p>6.3.2 9-([1,1<b>′</b>-Biphenyl]-4-ylphenylmethylene)-9H-xanthene 185</p> <p>6.3.3 Dicyanomethylenated Acridones 186</p> <p>6.3.4 Bis(diarylmethylene)dihydroanthracene [31] 187</p> <p>6.4 Other High-contrast CIEE Luminogens 190</p> <p>6.4.1 4-Dimethylamino-2-Benzylidene Malonic Acid Dimethyl Ester 190</p> <p>6.4.2 Diphenyl Maleimide Derivatives [33] 191</p> <p>6.4.3 3,4-Bisthienylmaleic Anhydride [34] 192</p> <p>6.4.4 Boron-containing CIEE Luminogens 193</p> <p>6.5 Potential Applications 196</p> <p>6.5.1 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Sensor 196</p> <p>6.5.2 OLED 196</p> <p>6.5.3 High-density Data Storage 197</p> <p>6.5.4 Mechanochromic (MC) Luminescent Sensor 198</p> <p>6.6 Summary and Perspective 198</p> <p>References 198</p> <p><b>7 Surface-fixation Induced Emission </b><b>203<br /></b><i>Yohei Ishida and Shinsuke Takagi</i></p> <p>7.1 Introduction 203</p> <p>7.2 What Happened to the Characteristics of Molecules on the Clay Mineral Nanosheets 205</p> <p>7.3 Clay–Molecular Complexes 206</p> <p>7.4 Absorption Spectra of Clay–Molecular Complexes 207</p> <p>7.5 Emission Enhancement Phenomenon in Clay–Molecular Complexes: S-FIE 208</p> <p>7.6 Mechanism of Surface-Fixation Induced Emission 211</p> <p>7.7 Summary and Outlook 214</p> <p>Acknowledgment 215</p> <p>References 215</p> <p><b>8 Aggregation-induced Delayed Fluorescence </b><b>221<br /></b><i>Yan Fu, Hao Chen, Zujin Zhao, and Ben Zhong Tang</i></p> <p>8.1 Introduction 221</p> <p>8.2 Novel Aggregation-induced Delayed Fluorescence Luminogens 222</p> <p>8.3 Conclusion and Outlook 247</p> <p>References 247</p> <p><b>9 Homogeneous Systems to Induce Emission of AIEgens </b><b>251<br /></b><i>Kenta Kokado and Kazuki Sada</i></p> <p>9.1 Introduction 251</p> <p>9.2 Homogeneous Solution 252</p> <p>9.2.1 Complexation with Anions 253</p> <p>9.2.2 Complexation with Cations 254</p> <p>9.2.3 Inclusion Complexes 256</p> <p>9.2.4 Adhesion on Macromolecules 257</p> <p>9.2.5 Steric Hindrance 258</p> <p>9.2.6 Covalent Linkage 259</p> <p>9.3 Liquid 260</p> <p>9.4 Gels and Network Polymers 261</p> <p>9.4.1 Chemically Crosslinked Gels 261</p> <p>9.4.2 Physically Crosslinked Gels 262</p> <p>9.5 Crystalline Materials 264</p> <p>9.6 Outlook and Future Perspectives 266</p> <p>References 266</p> <p><b>10 Hetero-aggregation-induced Tunable Emission (HAITE) Through Cocrystal Strategy </b><b>273<br /></b><i>Yinjuan Huang and Qichun Zhang</i></p> <p>10.1 Introduction 273</p> <p>10.2 Interactions Within Organic Cocrystals 274</p> <p>10.3 Preparation of Organic Cocrystals 275</p> <p>10.4 Molecular Stacking Modes Within Organic Cocrystals 276</p> <p>10.5 Characterization of Organic Cocrystals 277</p> <p>10.6 HAITE Through Cocrystal Strategy 277</p> <p>10.6.1 HAITE with Tunable Color and Enhanced Emission 278</p> <p>10.6.1.1 Insignificant Changed Intensity but Tuned Color 278</p> <p>10.6.1.2 Enhanced Emission and Tuned Color 287</p> <p>10.6.2 HAITE with Increased PLQY but Intrinsic Color 291</p> <p>10.6.3 HAITE: Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence 297</p> <p>10.6.4 HAITE-phosphorescence 300</p> <p>10.7 Summary and Outlook 302</p> <p>References 304</p> <p><b>11 Anti-Kasha Emission from Organic Aggregates </b><b>311<br /></b><i>Wenbin Huang and Zikai He</i></p> <p>11.1 Introduction 311</p> <p>11.2 Anti-Kasha Emission from Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds in Aggregates 312</p> <p>11.3 Anti-Kasha Emission from Azulene Compounds in Aggregate 322</p> <p>11.4 Anti-Kasha Emission from Other Unconventional Aromatic Compounds in Aggregates 324</p> <p>11.5 Conclusions 327</p> <p>References 327</p> <p><b>12 Aggregation-enhanced Emission: From Flexible to Rigid Cores </b><b>333<br /></b><i>Harnimarta Deol, Gurpreet Singh, Vandana Bhalla, and Manoj Kumar</i></p> <p>12.1 Introduction 333</p> <p>12.2 Freely Moving Rotors-induced Emission Enhancement 334</p> <p>12.3 Guest-induced Emission Enhancement 344</p> <p>12.4 Conclusion 366</p> <p>Acknowledgment 367</p> <p>References 367</p> <p><b>13 Room-temperature Phosphorescence of Pure Organics </b><b>371<br /></b><i>Tianwen Zhu, Zihao Zhao, Tianjia Yang, and Wang Zhang Yuan</i></p> <p>13.1 Introduction 371</p> <p>13.2 Fundamental Mechanism in Organic Phosphorescence 372</p> <p>13.2.1 Photophysical Process for Phosphorescence 372</p> <p>13.2.2 Theoretical Study on Phosphorescent Process 373</p> <p>13.3 Recent Progress in Organic RTP Materials 375</p> <p>13.3.1 Crystallization-induced RTP 375</p> <p>13.3.1.1 Heavy Atom Effect 376</p> <p>13.3.1.2 Molecular Interaction 380</p> <p>13.3.1.3 H-aggregation 380</p> <p>13.3.2 Doping in Rigid Matrix-induced RTP 382</p> <p>13.3.2.1 Host–Guest System 385</p> <p>13.3.2.2 Doping in Polymer Matrix 387</p> <p>13.3.3 Clustering-triggered RTP 389</p> <p>13.3.3.1 Natural Products 389</p> <p>13.3.3.2 Synthetic Compounds 394</p> <p>13.3.4 Other Systems 399</p> <p>13.3.4.1 Amorphous Organics 399</p> <p>13.3.4.2 Organic Framework 399</p> <p>13.3.4.3 Supramolecular Organics 402</p> <p>13.3.4.4 Hybrid Perovskites 403</p> <p>13.3.5 Applications 405</p> <p>13.4 Conclusions and Perspectives 405</p> <p>References 407</p> <p><b>14 A Global Potential Energy Surface Approach to the Photophysics of AIEgens: The Role of Conical Intersections </b><b>411<br /></b><i>Rachel Crespo-Otero and Lluís Blancafort</i></p> <p>14.1 Introduction 411</p> <p>14.2 Methodological Aspects 412</p> <p>14.2.1 Intramolecular Restriction Models and the FGR-based Approach 412</p> <p>14.2.2 A PES-based Description of Photochemical Mechanisms 412</p> <p>14.2.3 Computational Approaches for Excited States 416</p> <p>14.2.3.1 Electronic Structure Methods for Excited States 416</p> <p>14.2.3.2 Dynamics Simulations in the Context of AIE 420</p> <p>14.2.4 Methods for Large Systems 420</p> <p>14.3 CI-centered Global PES for AIEgens 424</p> <p>14.3.1 Double-bond Torsion 424</p> <p>14.3.2 Double-bond Torsion <i>vs </i>Cyclization in TPE Derivatives 428</p> <p>14.3.3 Excited-state Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) Compounds 431</p> <p>14.3.4 Ring Puckering 432</p> <p>14.3.5 Bond Stretching 435</p> <p>14.3.6 A View of AIE Based on the RACI Model and the Global PES 436</p> <p>14.4 Crystallization-induced Phosphorescence 436</p> <p>14.5 Effect of Intermolecular and Intramolecular Interactions on the Photophysics of AIEgens 437</p> <p>14.5.1 Excitonic Effects in AIE 437</p> <p>14.5.2 Effect of Intramolecular and Intermolecular Interactions on Emission Color 439</p> <p>14.6 New Challenges 439</p> <p>14.6.1 The Role of Dark States in AIE 439</p> <p>14.6.2 Pressure-induced Emission Enhancement 440</p> <p>14.6.3 AIE in Transition Metal (TM) Compounds 442</p> <p>14.7 Conclusions and Outlook 443</p> <p>References 444</p> <p><b>15 Multicomponent Reactions as Synthetic Design Tools of AIE and Emission Solvatochromic Quinoxalines </b><b>455<br /></b><i>Lukas Biesen and Thomas J. J. Müller</i></p> <p>15.1 Introduction 455</p> <p>15.2 Synthetic Approaches to Quinoxalines via Multicomponent Reactions and One-Pot Processes 456</p> <p>15.3 Photophysical Properties and Emission Solvatochromicity of Quinoxalines 462</p> <p>15.4 AIE Characteristics and Effects of Quinoxalines 468</p> <p>15.5 Conclusion 476</p> <p>Acknowledgments 476</p> <p>References 476</p> <p><b>16 Aggregation-induced Emission Luminogens with Both High-luminescence Efficiency and Charge Mobility </b><b>485<br /></b><i>Ying Yu, Zheng Zhao, and Ben Zhong Tang</i></p> <p>16.1 Introduction 485</p> <p>16.2 p-Type OSCs 487</p> <p>16.3 n-Type OSCs 495</p> <p>16.4 Ambipolar OSCs 500</p> <p>16.5 Conclusion and Perspective 505</p> <p>References 505</p> <p><b>17 Morphology Modulation of Aggregation-induced Emission: From Thermodynamic Self-assembly to Kinetic Controlling </b><b>509<br /></b><i>Kaizhi Gu, Chenxu Yan, Zhiqian Guo, and Wei-Hong Zhu</i></p> <p>17.1 Introduction 509</p> <p>17.2 Aggregation Modulation of AIE Bioprobes via Hydrophilicity Improvement 511</p> <p>17.2.1 Molecular Modification 511</p> <p>17.2.2 Polymerization with Hydrophilic Matrix 515</p> <p>17.3 Thermodynamic Self-assembly of AIE Materials 519</p> <p>17.4 Morphology Tuning of AIE Nanoaggregates 519</p> <p>17.5 Kinetic-driven Preparation of AIE NPs 523</p> <p>17.6 Conclusion and Outlook 527</p> <p>References 527</p> <p><b>18 AIE-active Polymer </b><b>531<br /></b><i>Rong Hu, Anjun Qin, and Ben Zhong Tang</i></p> <p>18.1 Introduction 531</p> <p>18.2 Photophysical Properties 532</p> <p>18.2.1 Quantum Yield 532</p> <p>18.2.2 Photosensitization 536</p> <p>18.2.3 Two-photon Absorption and Emission 538</p> <p>18.2.4 Circularly Polarized Luminescence 540</p> <p>18.3 Applications 541</p> <p>18.3.1 Chem-sensor 541</p> <p>18.3.2 Bioimaging 543</p> <p>18.3.3 Therapy Applications 546</p> <p>18.4 Conclusion and Perspective 549</p> <p>Acknowledgments 550</p> <p>References 550</p> <p><b>19 Liquid-crystalline AIEgens: Materials and Applications </b><b>555<br /></b><i>Kyohei Hisano, Supattra Panthai, and Osamu Tsutsumi</i></p> <p>19.1 Introduction 555</p> <p>19.2 Materials: Molecular Design 556</p> <p>19.2.1 Discotic LC AIEgen 556</p> <p>19.2.2 Calamitic LC AIEgens 561</p> <p>19.2.3 Polymeric LC AIEgens 566</p> <p>19.3 Applications of LC AIEgens 567</p> <p>19.3.1 Linearly Polarized Luminescence 567</p> <p>19.3.2 Circularly Polarized Luminescence 568</p> <p>19.4 Conclusion 571</p> <p>References 571</p> <p><b>20 Push–Pull AIEgens </b><b>575<br /></b><i>Andrea Nitti and Dario Pasini</i></p> <p>20.1 Introduction 575</p> <p>20.2 Basic Concept of Molecular Design 576</p> <p>20.2.1 Photophysical Excited States in Aggregates 576</p> <p>20.2.2 Fundamental Molecular Design to Achieve Push–Pull AIEgens 579</p> <p>20.3 Push–Pull AIEgens from Rotor Structure 581</p> <p>20.3.1 Double Bond Stator 582</p> <p>20.3.2 Point-restricted Rotors from Atoms or Functional Groups 584</p> <p>20.3.3 Aromatic Rotors 587</p> <p>20.4 Push–Pull AIEgens from ACQ Chromophores 589</p> <p>20.4.1 BT-based AIEgens 589</p> <p>20.4.2 Cyanine and DCM-based AIEgens 594</p> <p>20.4.3 QM-based AIEgens 595</p> <p>20.4.4 DPP-based AIEgens 597</p> <p>20.4.5 Rylene-based AIEgens 599</p> <p>20.5 Concluding Remarks 602</p> <p>References 602</p> <p>Index 609</p>
<p><b>Youhong Tang</b> is a Professor at Flinders University, Australia and actively works in aggregation-induced emission areas. <p><b>Ben Zhong Tang</b> is a Chair Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen. He is widely known as the pioneer of the study of aggregation-induced emission.
<p><b>The first volume of the ultimate reference on the science and applications of aggregation-induced emission</b></p> <p>The <i>Handbook of Aggregation-Induced Emission</i> explores foundational and advanced topics in aggregation-induced emission, as well as cutting-edge developments in the field, celebrating twenty years of progress and achievement in this important and interdisciplinary field. The three volumes combine to offer readers a comprehensive and insightful interpretation accessible to both new and experienced researchers working on aggregation-induced emission. <p> In this first volume of three, the editors survey the subject of aggregation-induced emission with a focus on the fundamentals of various branches of the discipline, such as crystallization-induced emission, room temperature phosphorescence, aggregation-induced delayed fluorescence, and more. This book covers the new properties of materials endowed by molecular aggregates. It also includes: <ul><li>A thorough introduction to the mechanistic understanding of the importance of molecular motion to aggregation-induced emission</li> <li>An exploration of the aggregation-induced emission mechanism at the molecular level</li> <li>Practical discussions of aggregation-induced emission from the restriction of double bond rotation at the excited state, and clusterization-triggered emission</li></ul> <p>Perfect for academic researchers working on aggregation-induced emission, this set of volumes is also ideal for professionals and students in the fields of photophysics, photochemistry, materials science, optoelectronic materials, synthetic organic chemistry, macromolecular chemistry, polymer science, and biological sciences.

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