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Evolutions of the Complex Relationship Between Education and Territories


Evolutions of the Complex Relationship Between Education and Territories


1. Aufl.

von: Angela Barthes, Pierre Champollion, Yves Alpe

126,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-Iste
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 15.03.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9781119516514
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 350

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Beschreibungen

The book weaves the story of the complex links between education and its territories. The aim here is to examine the education couple - understood in the broadest sense: school, college, high school, universities - and territory, according to three main axes: the history and the characterization of the different ties maintained And which the school and its territory always maintain; That of the categorization and characterization of the territories in which the school is situated, of the educational policies - both explicit and grassroots - connected with it and their effects on the school; That of recent pedagogical, didactic and organizational innovations. The book is based on French specialists in territorial education issues.
Introduction xiii Part 1. Historical Developments and Contemporary Modalities of Interactions between Education and Territories 1 Introduction to Part 1   3 Chapter 1. What Role Should Territories Play in Public Education Policies?   5Bruno GARNIER 1.1. Summary    5 1.2. Introduction   5 1.3. Can the policy of recognition be established in France? 6 1.4. Globalization and national identity  8 1.5. Territorialization of education policies   10 1.6. Conclusion   12 1.7. Bibliography   13 Chapter 2. Heads of Schools: New Education–Territory Interaction Drivers?  19Alain BOUVIER, Michel BOYER, Thierry EYMARD and Laurent RIEUTORT 2.1. Summary    19 2.2. Introduction   19 2.3. Territories and the educational system: renewed challenges  20 2.3.1. The student at the center of a territorialized educational ecosystem  20 2.3.2. Geographical change: from “identity territory” to “network territory”   22 2.3.3. Seek coupling and collaboration among educational spaces 24 2.4. A research-action project  26 2.4.1. Knowledge based for co-construction within the territories 26 2.4.2. Quebec experience: community school  27 2.4.3. First step in collecting practices  28 2.5. Territorial risk management: first points of view 29 2.5.1. Which drivers? Being promoters of open, integrative and territorialized educational practices   29 2.5.2. What actions? Address the challenge of success and build partnerships   30 2.5.3. Which territories? At the heart of a new territoriality 32 2.6. Conclusion   35 2.7. Bibliography   35 Chapter 3. Educational Success: A Multi-actor Project in a Learning Territory Approach  37Maryvonne DUSSAUX 3.1. Summary    37 3.2. Introduction   37 3.3. Educational success: responsibility of local actors 39 3.3.1. An increasingly global and territorialized action 39 3.3.2. Education at the heart of the territory project 42 3.4. Networks of actors in the field of education  48 3.4.1. Reformulation of social and educational action  48 3.4.2. Toward a “learning territory” approach  54 3.5. Conclusion   58 3.6. Bibliography   59 Chapter 4. “Education For”, Territories and Positions of Teachers: Rupture and Tension  61Jean-Marc LANGE 4.1. Summary    61 4.2. Introduction   61 4.3. School model and territories  62 4.4. An inclusion for what purpose?   63 4.5. “Create a community” to address development challenges  66 4.5.1. Project modality  66 4.5.2. Possible forms and desirable form   67 4.6. Conclusion and perspectives: social responsibility of the school undertaken   71 4.7. Bibliography   72 Chapter 5. Education for Sustainable Development and Territories: Toward a New Age of Educational Relationships with Territories in Agricultural Education?  77Christian PELTIER 5.1. Summary    77 5.2. Introduction   78 5.3. Structuring elements of the link with the territory in agricultural education  79 5.3.1. Specificities enhancing opening to the territories 79 5.3.2. An old anchorage and new perspectives  80 5.3.3. A double difficulty: problematization and knowledge-tools 83 5.3.4. The opportunity of the “teach to produce differently” strategic project   84 5.4. An educational approach by territorialized integrative objects 85 5.4.1. The concept of integrative object   85 5.4.2. A didactic and territorial approach to integrative objects 86 5.4.3. Knowledge at stake: cognitive and conceptual approach to territorialized integrative objects  87 5.5. Issues posed by teaching activities on some territorialized integrative objects   88 5.5.1. Badger   89 5.5.2. Chicken breeding  91 5.5.3. The vegetable garden  92 5.6. Conclusion   93 5.7. Bibliography   95 Case Study 1. What Levers Exist for Preventing Orientation and Education Inequalities of Territorial Origin in Adult Training? Case of the Bio-construction Regional Vocational Training Center in the Southern Alps  99Valérie GUILLEMOT Part 2. Territories as Sources of Pedagogical Renewal 115 Introduction to Part 2   117 Chapter 6. Local Territory in French School Geography  119Christine VERGNOLLE MAINAR, Sophie GAUJAL and Caroline LEININGER-FREZAL 6.1. Summary    119 6.2. Introduction   119 6.3. Local setting in the teaching of geography: a variable place according to the eras and levels of education  121 6.3.1. 19th–20th Century: back and forth of the study of local setting in syllabuses  121 6.3.2. 21st Century: the primacy of the local setting in primary school, introducing the local setting in secondary schools 123 6.4. Relevance of the local setting in contemporary school geography: a challenge for teachers  126 6.4.1. Inhabiting: an epistemologically vague term 126 6.4.2. Difficulties in handling the local setting  128 6.4.3. Studying the local setting: a vector to transform ordinary practices   130 6.5. Conclusion   132 6.6. Bibliography   133 Chapter 7. When Territorial Commitment Gives Meaning to Professional Activity: Cases of Teachers in Rural Schools in France, Chile and Uruguay  135Catherine ROTHENBURGER 7.1. Summary    135 7.2. Introduction   135 7.3. Theoretical contributions  136 7.4. Methodology   137 7.5. Findings   138 7.5.1. Search for the territory social recognition and learning: common bases of a territorial commitment  138 7.5.2. Territorial commitment: what local issues and actions?  140 7.6. Conclusion   142 7.7. Bibliography   144 Chapter 8. Relatedness with the Non-Human Environment and Motivation Systems: Keys to Include the Territory in Environmental Education  147Christian REYNAUD, Rouba REAIDI and Serge FRANC 8.1. Abstract   147 8.2. Introduction   147 8.3. A complex model of human motivations  148 8.4. Relatedness between non-human environment and motivation 150 8.5. Relatedness, sensitive approach to environmental education and motivation    151 8.6. Conclusion   153 8.7. Bibliography   153 Chapter 9. Territory-Based Education in Elementary Schools: PNR Queyras-EN Projects   155Sylviane BLANC-MAXIMIN and Michel FLORO 9.1. Summary    155 9.2. Introduction   155 9.3. School–territory relationships faced with different types of conflicts 156 9.4. The concept of territory-based education  157 9.4.1. Know-how favored by territory  158 9.4.2. A cultural mediator aspect   159 9.4.3. The territory via its local heritage: promoter of values?  160 9.4.4. Territory-based education?   161 9.4.5. Conditions for the integration of the school in its territory. 161 9.5. Case study: partnership territorial educative project in the Queyras valley    162 9.5.1. Queyras and its writing tradition  162 9.5.2. Methodology  163 9.6. Results 164 9.6.1. Acquisition of local know-how  164 9.6.2. Unleashing the power of expression  165 9.6.3. Ambitious pedagogic approach  165 9.6.4. Civic values?  165 9.6.5. Education on local heritage   166 9.6.6. Making people responsible?  166 9.6.7. Heritage: a risk of isolationism  166 9.7. Conclusion   167 9.7.1. Anchoring a mountain territory in primary school partnership projects   167 9.7.2. A dynamic territory   168 9.7.3. Which emancipation?  168 9.7.4. The territory, a dynamic tool for education 169 9.8. Bibliography   169 Chapter 10. Sensitive Postcard of a Local Territory: Development and Issues  173Sophie GAUJAL 10.1. Summary   173 10.2. Introduction   173 10.3. First stage (T1): an ordinary course that promotes reasoned geography   174 10.4. Second stage (T2): generating spontaneous geography through a field trip   175 10.5. Third stage (T3): articulating spontaneous geography and reasoned geography by the development of a sensitive postcard. 178 10.6. Fourth stage (T4): reformulations  186 10.6.1. Overview   186 10.7. Bibliography   187 Case Study 2. Is the Rural Primary School a Hospitable School? Parents’ Point of View  189Benoit DEJAIFFE Part 3. Educational Policies and Territorial Education Inequalities  203 Introduction to Part 3   205 Chapter 11. The Rural School, a Polysemous Object with Significant Societal Challenges? Current Research Contexts and Positions  207Angela BARTHES and Yves ALPE 11.1. Summary   207 11.2. Introduction   207 11.3. How the rural school became a research “problem” and subject 208 11.3.1. The supposed “deficiencies” of the rural school and inappropriateness of educational policies   208 11.3.2. Pedagogical and institutional responses to the supposed difficulties of rural students  210 11.4. What research exists around the rural school problems?  212 11.5. Current major research debates on rural schools 215 11.5.1. The paradox of good rural academic results 215 11.5.2. Can we still talk about the lack of ambition by rural students? 216 11.5.3. Is there a “territory effect” on the educational performance and trajectories of rural students?   216 11.6. Conclusion   218 11.7. Bibliography   220 Chapter 12. Relationships between Career Orientation and Territoriality: Elements of Theorization from Rural Mountain Areas    223Pierre CHAMPOLLION 12.1. Summary   223 12.2. Introduction: historical reviews related to the general theme: “education and territory”  224 12.3. Key components of the conceptual framework 228 12.3.1. Educational inequalities, academic inequalities, career orientation inequalities  228 12.3.2. Territory and territoriality: two related composite concepts 229 12.4. The case of rural mountain area schools  232 12.4.1. The initial question  232 12.4.2. Main characteristics of the rural mountain area school  234 12.4.3. Current developments: toward a gradual “deconstruction” of the historical specificity of the rural mountain area school?  237 12.5. Approaches to the relationships between career orientation and territoriality   238 12.5.1. Historical background and societal challenges  238 12.5.2. Career orientation in rural mountain areas 239 12.5.3. Adapting the school to the local context  241 12.5.4. “Effects of territory”?  243 12.6. Conclusions: main achievements of the research, pending issues, thematic continuity and elaboration and avenues for research   247 12.6.1. Main achievements of the research  247 12.6.2. Pending issues  248 12.6.3. Thematic continuity and elaboration  248 12.6.4. Toward a theoretical reappraisal?   250 12.6.5. By way of proper “conclusion”  251 12.7. Bibliography   252 Chapter 13. Toward Convergences between Rural and Urban? Comparative Analyses of Educational Contexts and Social Representations in CM2 261Pierre CHAMPOLLION 13.1. Summary   261 13.2. Introduction   262 13.3. Problem and current developments  262 13.4. Corpus and methodology  265 13.4.1. Corpus   265 13.4.2. Methodology  267 13.5. Findings and analyses   267 13.5.1. Contexts (cultural and family)  267 13.5.2. Territorial social representations (of surrounding and remote territories)  272 13.5.3. Perceived behaviors, assessed-projected performances and orientation–insertion projects   275 13.5.4. General overview of section 13.5   283 13.6. Provisional findings and research avenues  284 13.7. Bibliography   286 Chapter 14. The Inadequacy of French Rural School Public Policies    289Yves ALPE and Angela BARTHES 14.1. Summary   289 14.2. Introduction   289 14.3. Rural school contexts and recent research developments  290 14.3.1. Age-old delay of the rural school and its poor image  290 14.3.2. The reversal of trends from the 1990s: toward the observation of good academic performance of rural students  291 14.3.3. What recent studies on the rural school apparently reveal: the end of rural student specificity?  292 14.3.4. Rural students’ school projects are becoming less and less specific.   295 14.3.5. Rural students’ professional plans are no longer significantly marked by their territory of residence 297 14.3.6. End of rural students’ attachment to their territory? 301 14.4. End of rural students “specificity” and inadequacy of public education policies  303 14.4.1. What the General Inspectorate’s reports said about rural schools    303 14.4.2. Territorialized educational policies in view of rural developments   304 14.5. Conclusion   306 14.6. Bibliography   307 Case Study 3. Comparison of Rural and Urban Area Girls’ Career Orientation at the End of Troisième.  309Boris MEUNIER Conclusion 319 List of Authors   325 Index  327

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