Details

Engineering Research


Engineering Research

Design, Methods, and Publication
1. Aufl.

von: Herman Tang

103,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 18.12.2020
ISBN/EAN: 9781119624530
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 416

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

<p><b>Master the fundamentals of planning, preparing, conducting, and presenting engineering research with this one-stop resource</b></p> <p><i>Engineering Research: Design, Methods, and Publication</i> delivers a concise but comprehensive guide on how to properly conceive and execute research projects within an engineering field. Accomplished professional and author Herman Tang covers the foundational and advanced topics necessary to understand engineering research, from conceiving an idea to disseminating the results of the project.</p> <p>Organized in the same order as the most common sequence of activities for an engineering research project, the book is split into three parts and nine chapters. The book begins with a section focused on proposal development and literature review, followed by a description of data and methods that explores quantitative and qualitative experiments and analysis, and ends with a section on project presentation and preparation of scholarly publication.</p> <p><i>Engineering Research</i> offers readers the opportunity to understand the methodology of the entire process of engineering research in the real word. The author focuses on executable process and principle-guided exercise as opposed to abstract theory. Readers will learn about:</p> <ul> <li>An overview of scientific research in engineering, including foundational and fundamental concepts like types of research and considerations of research validity</li> <li>How to develop research proposals and how to search and review the scientific literature</li> <li>How to collect data and select a research method for their quantitative or qualitative experiment and analysis</li> <li>How to prepare, present, and submit their research to audiences and scholarly papers and publications</li> </ul> <p>Perfect for advanced undergraduate and engineering students taking research methods courses, <i>Engineering Research</i> also belongs on the bookshelves of engineering and technical professionals who wish to brush up on their knowledge about planning, preparing, conducting, and presenting their own scientific research.</p>
<p>About the Author xvi</p> <p>Preface xvii</p> <p>Acknowledgments xxiii</p> <p><b>Part I Overview, Proposal, and Literature Review </b><b>1</b></p> <p><b>1 Research Overview </b><b>3</b></p> <p>1.1 Introduction to Research 3</p> <p>1.1.1 What Is Research? 3</p> <p>1.1.1.1 Seeking New Knowledge 3</p> <p>1.1.1.2 A Systems Viewpoint 4</p> <p>1.1.1.3 General Characteristics 5</p> <p>1.1.2 Impacts of Research 7</p> <p>1.1.2.1 Impacts on Societies 7</p> <p>1.1.2.2 For Specific Objectives 8</p> <p>1.1.2.3 Benefits to Student Researchers 9</p> <p>1.2 Building Blocks of Research 10</p> <p>1.2.1 Innovative Mind 10</p> <p>1.2.1.1 Motivations to Research 10</p> <p>1.2.1.2 Thinking and Research 11</p> <p>1.2.1.3 Critical Thinking 12</p> <p>1.2.2 Assumptions and Hypotheses 13</p> <p>1.2.2.1 Assumptions 13</p> <p>1.2.2.2 Hypothesis 14</p> <p>1.2.3 Methodology and Methods 14</p> <p>1.2.3.1 Methodology 15</p> <p>1.2.3.2 Methods 15</p> <p>1.2.3.3 Process 15</p> <p>1.2.4 Research Community 16</p> <p>1.2.4.1 Environment 16</p> <p>1.2.4.2 Ethics 16</p> <p>1.2.4.3 Funding Sources 17</p> <p>1.3 Types of Research 18</p> <p>1.3.1 Basic Research, Applied Research, and R&D 18</p> <p>1.3.1.1 Basic Research 18</p> <p>1.3.1.2 Applied Research 19</p> <p>1.3.1.3 Engineering R&D 20</p> <p>1.3.2 More Discussion on R&D 24</p> <p>1.3.2.1 Objectives of Engineering R&D 24</p> <p>1.3.2.2 Experimental and Empirical Research 25</p> <p>1.3.2.3 Descriptive, Exploratory, Analytical, and Predictive Research 25</p> <p>1.3.2.4 Case Study 27</p> <p>1.4 Validity of Research Results 28</p> <p>1.4.1 Research Validity 28</p> <p>1.4.1.1 Concept of Validity 28</p> <p>1.4.1.2 Internal Validity 29</p> <p>1.4.1.3 External Validity 30</p> <p>1.4.2 Assessment and Advance 31</p> <p>1.4.2.1 To Get Validated 31</p> <p>1.4.2.2 Considerations of Validities 32</p> <p>1.4.2.3 Publication and Further Development 33</p> <p>Summary 35</p> <p>Exercises 36</p> <p>References 38</p> <p><b>2 Research Proposal Development </b><b>43</b></p> <p>2.1 Research Initiation 43</p> <p>2.1.1 Research Proposal 43</p> <p>2.1.1.1 Form Ideas from Problems 43</p> <p>2.1.1.2 Idea Evaluation 44</p> <p>2.1.1.3 Student Research Development 46</p> <p>2.1.1.4 Proposal, Protocol, Prospectus 47</p> <p>2.1.2 Hypotheses 48</p> <p>2.1.2.1 Objective and Hypothesis 48</p> <p>2.1.2.2 Format of Hypothesis 48</p> <p>2.1.2.3 Research Based on Hypotheses 49</p> <p>2.2 Composition of Proposal 50</p> <p>2.2.1 Key Elements of Proposal 50</p> <p>2.2.1.1 Proposal Format and Structure 50</p> <p>2.2.1.2 Research Objectives 51</p> <p>2.2.1.3 Proposal Summary and Description 52</p> <p>2.2.1.4 Student Competition and Proposals 53</p> <p>2.2.2 Other Sections of Proposal 54</p> <p>2.2.2.1 PI and Team 54</p> <p>2.2.2.2 Budget Plan 54</p> <p>2.2.2.3 Supporting Materials 55</p> <p>2.3 Proposal Development 56</p> <p>2.3.1 Essential Issues 56</p> <p>2.3.1.1 Meeting Requirements 56</p> <p>2.3.1.2 Planning for Outcomes 57</p> <p>2.3.1.3 Methods Overview 57</p> <p>2.3.2 Tasks of Development 59</p> <p>2.3.3 Development Process 62</p> <p>2.3.3.1 Overall Proposal Development 62</p> <p>2.3.3.2 Three Key Aspects 62</p> <p>2.3.3.3 Two-step Development 64</p> <p>2.4 Evaluation and Revision 65</p> <p>2.4.1 Evaluation for Success 65</p> <p>2.4.1.1 Drafting and Revision 65</p> <p>2.4.1.2 Evaluation Overview 66</p> <p>2.4.1.3 Evaluation Criteria 67</p> <p>2.4.2 Self-assessment 68</p> <p>2.4.2.1 Two Key Factors to Address 68</p> <p>2.4.2.2 A Review Checklist 69</p> <p>2.4.2.3 A Simple Evaluation 71</p> <p>2.5 Considerations For Improvement 72</p> <p>2.5.1 Paying Attention 72</p> <p>2.5.1.1 Research Aims 72</p> <p>2.5.1.2 Detail Level of Proposal 72</p> <p>2.5.1.3 Other Concerns 73</p> <p>2.5.1.4 Additional Preparation Tips 73</p> <p>2.5.2 More Considerations 74</p> <p>2.5.2.1 Pilot Study 74</p> <p>2.5.2.2 Cross Disciplinary 74</p> <p>2.5.2.3 Backup Plan 75</p> <p>2.5.2.4 Unsuccessful Proposals 76</p> <p>Summary 77</p> <p>Exercises 78</p> <p>References 80</p> <p><b>3 Literature Search and Review </b><b>85</b></p> <p>3.1 Introduction to Literature Review 85</p> <p>3.1.1 Overview of Literature Review 85</p> <p>3.1.1.1 What Is Literature Review 85</p> <p>3.1.1.2 The Formats of Literature Review 85</p> <p>3.1.2 Purposes of Literature Review 86</p> <p>3.1.2.1 To Understand Status Quo 86</p> <p>3.1.2.2 To Learn from Other Professionals 87</p> <p>3.1.2.3 To Look for New Opportunities 88</p> <p>3.1.2.4 To Assess Research Methods 89</p> <p>3.1.2.5 To Justify Proposed Research 90</p> <p>3.1.3 Keys of Literature Review 90</p> <p>3.1.3.1 Review Process 90</p> <p>3.1.3.2 Information Processing 91</p> <p>3.1.3.3 Focuses and Structure of Review 92</p> <p>3.1.3.4 Items of Significance 93</p> <p>3.2 Literature Sources and Search 94</p> <p>3.2.1 Information and Process 94</p> <p>3.2.1.1 Search Process 94</p> <p>3.2.1.2 General Information Sources 95</p> <p>3.2.1.3 Scholarly Publications 96</p> <p>3.2.2 Literature Sources 97</p> <p>3.2.2.1 Scholarly Databases 97</p> <p>3.2.2.2 Public Domain Internet 97</p> <p>3.2.2.3 Open Access 99</p> <p>3.2.2.4 Patents 100</p> <p>3.2.3 Considerations in Search 103</p> <p>3.2.3.1 Using Keywords 103</p> <p>3.2.3.2 Search with Constraints 104</p> <p>3.2.3.3 Currency of Literature 105</p> <p>3.2.3.4 When to Stop 107</p> <p>3.3 Conducting Literature Review 108</p> <p>3.3.1 Basic Tasks 108</p> <p>3.3.1.1 Overall Attention 108</p> <p>3.3.1.2 Organizing Analysis 109</p> <p>3.3.1.3 Making Good Argument 110</p> <p>3.3.2 Focal Points 111</p> <p>3.3.2.1 On Methods 111</p> <p>3.3.2.2 Exploring Trends 112</p> <p>3.3.3 Standalone Review Articles 112</p> <p>3.3.3.1 Review Articles 112</p> <p>3.3.3.2 To Prepare Review Article 113</p> <p>3.3.3.3 Structure of Literature Review 114</p> <p>3.3.4 Writing Considerations 116</p> <p>3.3.4.1 Professional Tone 116</p> <p>3.3.4.2 Citation and Format 117</p> <p>3.3.4.3 Common Concerns 117</p> <p>Summary 118</p> <p>Exercises 119</p> <p>References 121</p> <p><b>Part II Quantitative and Qualitative Methods </b><b>127</b></p> <p><b>4 Research Data and Method Selection </b><b>129</b></p> <p>4.1 Data in Research 129</p> <p>4.1.1 Data Overview 129</p> <p>4.1.1.1 Data and Research 129</p> <p>4.1.1.2 Data Management 129</p> <p>4.1.1.3 Data Science 131</p> <p>4.1.2 Characteristics of Data 132</p> <p>4.1.2.1 Data Distributions 133</p> <p>4.1.2.2 Considerations in Research Data 133</p> <p>4.1.3 Data Analysis 135</p> <p>4.1.3.1 Prep to Data Analysis 135</p> <p>4.1.3.2 Overall Data Analysis 136</p> <p>4.2 Types of Data 137</p> <p>4.2.1 Basic Types of Data 137</p> <p>4.2.1.1 Primary Data 137</p> <p>4.2.1.2 Secondary Data 137</p> <p>4.2.1.3 Open Data 139</p> <p>4.2.2 Quantitative vs. Qualitative Data 140</p> <p>4.2.2.1 Numerical or Non-numerical Data 140</p> <p>4.2.2.2 Quality of Quantitative Data 141</p> <p>4.2.2.3 Reliability of Qualitative Data 141</p> <p>4.2.3 Scales of Data 142</p> <p>4.2.3.1 Nominal Data 142</p> <p>4.2.3.2 Ordinal Data 143</p> <p>4.2.3.3 Binary Data 143</p> <p>4.2.3.4 Interval and Ratio Data 144</p> <p>4.3 Data Collection 144</p> <p>4.3.1 Data Collection Sampling 144</p> <p>4.3.1.1 Purpose of Data Sampling 144</p> <p>4.3.1.2 General Considerations for Sampling 145</p> <p>4.3.1.3 To Determine Sample Size 146</p> <p>4.3.2 Probability Sampling Methods 147</p> <p>4.3.2.1 Simple Sampling 147</p> <p>4.3.2.2 Systematic Sampling 148</p> <p>4.3.2.3 Stratified and Cluster Sampling 148</p> <p>4.3.3 Non-probability Sampling Methods 148</p> <p>4.3.3.1 Types of Non-probability Sampling 148</p> <p>4.3.3.2 Characteristics of Non-probability Sampling 150</p> <p>4.4 Method Selection 151</p> <p>4.4.1 Selection Factors 151</p> <p>4.4.1.1 Objective Driven 151</p> <p>4.4.1.2 Data Based 152</p> <p>4.4.1.3 Various Process Steps 153</p> <p>4.4.2 Qualitative and Quantitative 154</p> <p>4.4.2.1 Qualitative vs. Quantitative 154</p> <p>4.4.2.2 Induction vs. Deduction 156</p> <p>4.4.2.3 Method Evaluation 157</p> <p>4.4.3 Other Considerations 157</p> <p>4.4.3.1 Knowledge and Preference 157</p> <p>4.4.3.2 Possibility of Different Methods 158</p> <p>4.4.3.3 Purposeful Data Selection 159</p> <p>4.4.3.4 Non-data-related Research 159</p> <p>Summary 160</p> <p>Exercises 162</p> <p>References 164</p> <p><b>5 Quantitative Methods and Experimental Research </b><b>171</b></p> <p>5.1 Statistical Analyses 171</p> <p>5.1.1 Descriptive Statistical Analysis 171</p> <p>5.1.1.1 Overview of Statistical Analysis 171</p> <p>5.1.1.2 Purposes of Descriptive Analysis 172</p> <p>5.1.1.3 Central Tendency 173</p> <p>5.1.1.4 Variability 173</p> <p>5.1.2 Inferential Statistical Analysis 174</p> <p>5.1.2.1 Characteristics of Inferential Analyses 174</p> <p>5.1.2.2 Data Association 174</p> <p>5.1.2.3 Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) 175</p> <p>5.1.2.4 Regression Analyses 176</p> <p>5.1.3 Interpretation of Analysis Results 179</p> <p>5.1.3.1 Hypothesis Testing Process 179</p> <p>5.1.3.2 Hypothesis Test Results 180</p> <p>5.1.3.3 Outlier Detection and Exclusion 180</p> <p>5.1.3.4 Identifying Limitations of Study 181</p> <p>5.2 Quantitative Research 182</p> <p>5.2.1 Mathematical Modeling 182</p> <p>5.2.1.1 Concept of Modeling 182</p> <p>5.2.1.2 Applications of Math Modeling 183</p> <p>5.2.2 Optimization 183</p> <p>5.2.2.1 Concept of Optimization 183</p> <p>5.2.2.2 Optimization Applications 184</p> <p>5.2.3 Computer Simulation 185</p> <p>5.2.3.1 Concept of Simulation 185</p> <p>5.2.3.2 Common Types of Simulation 186</p> <p>5.2.3.3 Examples of Simulation 188</p> <p>5.2.4 New Technologies 189</p> <p>5.3 Experimental Studies 189</p> <p>5.3.1 Overview of Experimental Studies 190</p> <p>5.3.1.1 Basic Elements of Experiments 190</p> <p>5.3.1.2 Influencing Factors 191</p> <p>5.3.1.3 Other Considerations 191</p> <p>5.3.2 Comparative Studies 192</p> <p>5.3.2.1 Concept of Comparative Studies 192</p> <p>5.3.2.2 True Experimental Design 193</p> <p>5.3.2.3 Other Comparative Designs 195</p> <p>5.4 Factorial Design of Experiment (DOE) 196</p> <p>5.4.1 Introduction to DOE 196</p> <p>5.4.1.1 Concept of DOE 196</p> <p>5.4.1.2 Advantage of DOE 196</p> <p>5.4.1.3 Two-level Factorial Design 198</p> <p>5.4.2 Process of DOE Applications 198</p> <p>5.4.2.1 Overall Procedure 198</p> <p>5.4.3 Considerations in DOE 201</p> <p>5.4.3.1 Basic Requirements 201</p> <p>5.4.3.2 Fractional Factorial Designs 202</p> <p>Summary 203</p> <p>Exercises 204</p> <p>References 206</p> <p><b>6 Qualitative Methods and Mixed Methods </b><b>213</b></p> <p>6.1 Qualitative Research 213</p> <p>6.1.1 Qualitative Research Basics 213</p> <p>6.1.1.1 Qualitative Methods Overview 213</p> <p>6.1.1.2 Methods of Qualitative Analysis 214</p> <p>6.1.1.3 Concepts and Applications 214</p> <p>6.1.1.4 Using Qualitative Methods 216</p> <p>6.1.2 Discussion on Qualitative Analysis 217</p> <p>6.1.2.1 Qualitative Data and Research 217</p> <p>6.1.2.2 Reflexive Thinking 218</p> <p>6.1.2.3 Qualitative Analysis in Engineering 219</p> <p>6.2 Questionnaire Survey 220</p> <p>6.2.1 Basics of Survey 220</p> <p>6.2.1.1 Survey Basics 220</p> <p>6.2.1.2 Applications of Survey in Engineering 221</p> <p>6.2.1.3 Structure of a Survey 221</p> <p>6.2.1.4 Characteristics of Survey Study 222</p> <p>6.2.2 Questionnaire Development 224</p> <p>6.2.2.1 Development Tasks 224</p> <p>6.2.2.2 Preparing Questions 225</p> <p>6.2.2.3 Rating Scale 226</p> <p>6.2.2.4 Open-Ended Questions 227</p> <p>6.2.3 Considerations in Conducting Survey 228</p> <p>6.2.3.1 Validation 228</p> <p>6.2.3.2 Anonymity 228</p> <p>6.2.3.3 Return Rate 228</p> <p>6.2.3.4 Incentive 229</p> <p>6.2.4 Data Analysis of Survey Results 229</p> <p>6.2.4.1 Data Coding 229</p> <p>6.2.4.2 Types of Data Analysis 230</p> <p>6.3 Interviews and Observations 231</p> <p>6.3.1 Interview Studies 231</p> <p>6.3.1.1 Overview of Interviews 231</p> <p>6.3.1.2 Types and Characteristics of Interviews 232</p> <p>6.3.1.3 Considerations in Interviews 232</p> <p>6.3.1.4 Limitations of Interviews 233</p> <p>6.3.2 Focus Group Studies 233</p> <p>6.3.2.1 Objective of Focus Group 233</p> <p>6.3.2.2 Execution of Focus Group 234</p> <p>6.3.2.3 Considerations of Focus Group 234</p> <p>6.3.3 Observational Studies 235</p> <p>6.3.3.1 Execution of Observational Studies 235</p> <p>6.3.3.2 Advantages of Observational Studies 235</p> <p>6.3.3.3 Limitations of Observational Studies 236</p> <p>6.4 Mixed-Method Approaches 236</p> <p>6.4.1 Combination of Two Types of Methods 236</p> <p>6.4.1.1 Characteristics of Mixed Methods 236</p> <p>6.4.1.2 Considerations for Using Mixed Methods 237</p> <p>6.4.1.3 Applications of Mixed Method Research 238</p> <p>6.4.2 Method Integration 240</p> <p>6.4.2.1 Integration Considerations 240</p> <p>6.4.2.2 Discussion of Mixed Methods 242</p> <p>Summary 243</p> <p>Exercises 245</p> <p>References 246</p> <p><b>Part III Management, Writing, and Publication </b><b>253</b></p> <p><b>7 Research Execution and Management </b><b>255</b></p> <p>7.1 Basics of Project Management 255</p> <p>7.1.1 Life Cycle of Research Project 255</p> <p>7.1.1.1 Research Life Cycle 255</p> <p>7.1.1.2 Main Aspects of Research Project 255</p> <p>7.1.1.3 Overall Efforts 256</p> <p>7.1.1.4 Continuous Advance 259</p> <p>7.1.2 Performance of Research Project 260</p> <p>7.1.2.1 Performance and Planning 260</p> <p>7.1.2.2 Execution and Reporting 261</p> <p>7.1.2.3 Progress Monitoring 262</p> <p>7.1.2.4 Project Adjustments 262</p> <p>7.2 Research Administration 265</p> <p>7.2.1 Overall Functionality 265</p> <p>7.2.1.1 Goals of Research Administration 265</p> <p>7.2.1.2 Administration and Support 265</p> <p>7.2.1.3 Main Research Offices 267</p> <p>7.2.1.4 Teamwork Between PI and RA 268</p> <p>7.2.2 Academic Integrity 269</p> <p>7.2.2.1 Research Misconduct 269</p> <p>7.2.2.2 Plagiarism 271</p> <p>7.2.2.3 Conflicts of Interest 271</p> <p>7.2.2.4 Export Controls 272</p> <p>7.3 Pre-Award Management 273</p> <p>7.3.1 Tasks and Funding 273</p> <p>7.3.1.1 Pre-Award Tasks 273</p> <p>7.3.1.2 Support to Proposal Development 274</p> <p>7.3.1.3 Internal Funding 275</p> <p>7.3.1.4 External Funding Search 275</p> <p>7.3.1.5 Funding Sources 276</p> <p>7.3.2 Proposal Development 277</p> <p>7.3.2.1 Assistance from RA 277</p> <p>7.3.2.2 Budgeting Considerations 278</p> <p>7.3.2.3 Proposal Checklists 279</p> <p>7.3.3 Human Subjects (IRB) 280</p> <p>7.3.3.1 Human Subjects Related 280</p> <p>7.3.3.2 IRB Reviews 280</p> <p>7.4 Post-Award Management 282</p> <p>7.4.1 Project Acceptance and Set Up 282</p> <p>7.4.1.1 Award Acceptance 282</p> <p>7.4.1.2 Project Set Up 282</p> <p>7.4.1.3 Project Reports 283</p> <p>7.4.1.4 Project Changes 283</p> <p>7.4.2 Application of Invention Patents 284</p> <p>7.4.2.1 Considerations for Patent 284</p> <p>7.4.2.2 Types of Patent 284</p> <p>7.4.2.3 Patent Application Process 285</p> <p>7.4.3 Project Closeout 287</p> <p>7.4.3.1 Basic Process 287</p> <p>7.4.3.2 Final Reports 288</p> <p>7.4.3.3 Other Administrative Tasks 289</p> <p>Summary 289</p> <p>Exercises 290</p> <p>References 292</p> <p><b>8 Research Report and Presentation </b><b>297</b></p> <p>8.1 Introduction to Academic Writing 297</p> <p>8.1.1 Academic Writing 297</p> <p>8.1.1.1 Academic Writing Overall 297</p> <p>8.1.1.2 Requirements of Academic Writing 298</p> <p>8.1.1.3 Elements and Their Significance 298</p> <p>8.1.2 Common Types 299</p> <p>8.1.2.1 Thesis and Dissertation 299</p> <p>8.1.2.2 Project Report 301</p> <p>8.1.2.3 Case Study Report 301</p> <p>8.1.3 Reports and Papers 302</p> <p>8.1.3.1 Types of Research Articles 302</p> <p>8.1.3.2 Technical Reports Vs. Scholarly Papers 302</p> <p>8.2 Elements of Report and Thesis 303</p> <p>8.2.1 Key Elements 303</p> <p>8.2.2 Core Elements 308</p> <p>8.2.3 Supporting Elements 312</p> <p>8.3 Development of Research Report 315</p> <p>8.3.1 Process of Write-ups 315</p> <p>8.3.1.1 Writing Sequence 315</p> <p>8.3.1.2 Timing and Efforts 316</p> <p>8.3.1.3 Update and Revision 316</p> <p>8.3.2 Writing Format 317</p> <p>8.3.2.1 Common Writing Styles 317</p> <p>8.3.2.2 Sections and Headings 317</p> <p>8.3.2.3 Figures and Tables 318</p> <p>8.3.2.4 Equations and Special Symbols 318</p> <p>8.3.3 Other Considerations 318</p> <p>8.3.3.1 Statements and Limitations 319</p> <p>8.3.3.2 Conciseness and Wording 319</p> <p>8.3.3.3 Other Tips on Writing Style 321</p> <p>8.4 Research Presentation 322</p> <p>8.4.1 Presentation at Conference 322</p> <p>8.4.1.1 Attending Conferences 322</p> <p>8.4.1.2 Presentation and Keynote 322</p> <p>8.4.1.3 Poster Presentation 323</p> <p>8.4.1.4 Conference Costs 324</p> <p>8.4.2 Presentation Design 324</p> <p>8.4.2.1 Number of Slides 325</p> <p>8.4.2.2 Slide Layout 326</p> <p>8.4.2.3 Graphics and Fonts 328</p> <p>8.4.3 Considerations for Presentation 328</p> <p>8.4.3.1 Practice for Overall Flow 328</p> <p>8.4.3.2 Professional Presenting 329</p> <p>8.4.3.3 Q&A Management 330</p> <p>8.4.3.4 Student’s Projects 330</p> <p>Summary 331</p> <p>Exercises 332</p> <p>References 334</p> <p><b>9 Scholarly Paper and Publication </b><b>339</b></p> <p>9.1 Considerations For Publication 339</p> <p>9.1.1 To Publish, or Not To Publish 339</p> <p>9.1.1.1 Possible Outlets 339</p> <p>9.1.1.2 Objectives of Publications 339</p> <p>9.1.1.3 Overall Publication Status 340</p> <p>9.1.1.4 Publication of Industrial R&D 341</p> <p>9.1.2 Types of Publication 343</p> <p>9.1.2.1 Types of Journal Papers 343</p> <p>9.1.2.2 Other Types of Publication 344</p> <p>9.1.3 Paper Quality 345</p> <p>9.1.3.1 Basic Requirements for Publication 345</p> <p>9.1.3.2 Preparation for Reviews 346</p> <p>9.2 Publication Process 347</p> <p>9.2.1 Overall Publication Process 347</p> <p>9.2.1.1 Main Steps 347</p> <p>9.2.1.2 Copyright Paperwork 349</p> <p>9.2.2 Peer Review Process 350</p> <p>9.2.2.1 Peer Review Overview 351</p> <p>9.2.2.2 Review Process and Ratings 351</p> <p>9.2.2.3 Characteristics of Peer Review 352</p> <p>9.2.2.4 Peer Review for Conference 353</p> <p>9.2.3 Review Comment and Response 353</p> <p>9.2.3.1 Comments and Recommendations of Reviewers 353</p> <p>9.2.3.2 Response to Peer Review 354</p> <p>9.2.3.3 Rejection Handling 355</p> <p>9.3 Target Scholarly Journals 356</p> <p>9.3.1 Journal Selection 356</p> <p>9.3.1.1 Overall Considerations 356</p> <p>9.3.1.2 Relevance 357</p> <p>9.3.1.3 Quality Factors 357</p> <p>9.3.1.4 Publishing Cost 359</p> <p>9.3.2 Journal Quality Indicators 360</p> <p>9.3.2.1 JCR Impact Factor 360</p> <p>9.3.2.2 CiteScore 361</p> <p>9.3.2.3 Other Indicators 361</p> <p>9.4 Writing For Publication 362</p> <p>9.4.1 From Report to Paper 362</p> <p>9.4.1.1 Additional Revision 362</p> <p>9.4.1.2 Elements of Research Paper 362</p> <p>9.4.1.3 Convert Thesis to Paper 363</p> <p>9.4.1.4 English Writing 364</p> <p>9.4.2 Abstract 364</p> <p>9.4.2.1 General Requirements 364</p> <p>9.4.2.2 Examples for Discussion 365</p> <p>9.4.2.3 Structured Abstract 365</p> <p>9.4.2.4 Highlights 367</p> <p>9.4.2.5 Keywords 368</p> <p>9.4.3 Other Sections 369</p> <p>9.4.3.1 Introduction 369</p> <p>9.4.3.2 Discussion 369</p> <p>9.4.3.3 Optional Items 370</p> <p>9.4.4 Publishing Ethics 370</p> <p>9.4.4.1 Appropriate Citation 370</p> <p>9.4.4.2 Authorship 371</p> <p>9.4.4.3 Exclusive Submission 373</p> <p>9.4.4.4 Publishing COI and IRB 373</p> <p>Summary 374</p> <p>Exercises 375</p> <p>References 376</p> <p>Epilogue 381</p> <p>Index 383</p>
<p><b>HERMAN TANG, P<small>H</small>D,</b> is Associated Professor at Eastern Michigan University. He is also Associate Editor for a scientific journal and a paper series, as well as a peer reviewer for over ten journals. He was Lead Engineering Specialist at Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and has published two books on vehicle manufacturing and many research papers.
<p><b>Master the fundamentals of planning, preparing, conducting, and presenting engineering research with this one-stop resource</b> <p><i>Engineering Research: Design, Methods, and Publication</i> delivers a concise but comprehensive guide on how to properly conceive and execute research projects within an engineering field. Accomplished professional and author Herman Tang covers the foundational and advanced topics necessary to understand engineering research, from conceiving an idea to disseminating the results of the project. <p>Organized in the same order as the most common sequence of activities for an engineering research project, the book is split into three parts and nine chapters. The book begins with a section focused on proposal development and literature review, followed by a description of data and methods that explores quantitative and qualitative experiments and analysis, and ends with a section on project presentation and preparation of scholarly publication. <p><i>Engineering Research</i> offers readers the opportunity to understand the methodology of the entire process of engineering research in the real word. The author focuses on executable process and principle-guided exercise as opposed to abstract theory. Readers will learn about: <ul> <li>An overview of scientific research in engineering, including foundational and fundamental concepts like types of research and considerations of research validity</i> <li>How to develop research proposals and how to search and review the scientific literature</li> <li>How to collect data and select a research method for their quantitative or qualitative experiment and analysis</li> <li>How to prepare, present, and submit their research to audiences and scholarly papers and publications</i> </ul> <p>Perfect for advanced undergraduate and engineering students taking research methods courses, <i>Engineering Research</i> also belongs on the bookshelves of engineering and technical professionals who wish to brush up on their knowledge about planning, preparing, conducting, and presenting their own scientific research.

Diese Produkte könnten Sie auch interessieren:

Strategies to the Prediction, Mitigation and Management of Product Obsolescence
Strategies to the Prediction, Mitigation and Management of Product Obsolescence
von: Bjoern Bartels, Ulrich Ermel, Peter Sandborn, Michael G. Pecht
PDF ebook
116,99 €