Details

Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids


Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids

Rheology and Functions
1. Aufl.

von: Seyed M.A. Razavi

244,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 14.02.2019
ISBN/EAN: 9781119418559
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 672

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Beschreibungen

The first guide devoted to the functions, structures, and applications of natural hydrocolloids In today’s health-conscious climate, the demand for natural food products is growing all the time. Natural hydrocolloids, therefore, have never been more popular. With their thickening, stabilizing, gelling, fat replacing, and binding qualities, these naturally occurring, plant-based polymers can fulfil many of the same functions as commercial ingredients like xanthan, guar, gum Arabic, pectin, and starch. Moreover, certain health benefits have been linked with their often biological active compounds and high-fiber compositions, including potential prebiotic effects and the reduction of blood cholesterol levels. Application of these novel hydrocolloids is, however, still underexplored. Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids aims to remedy this by providing a thorough overview of their structure–function relationships, rheological aspects, and potential utility in mainly the food and pharmaceutical industries. This accessible, quick-reference guide features:   A comprehensive and up-to-date survey of the most significant research currently available on natural hydrocolloids Examinations of the major functions and rheological aspects of novel hydrocolloids Information on the potential applications of biopolymers within both foods and pharmaceutical systems Collaborations from an international team of food scientists Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids: Rheology and Functions offers scientists, engineers, technologists, and researchers alike a unique and in-depth account of the uncharted world of novel hydrocolloids, their uses, properties, and potential benefits.
About the Editor xxi List of Contributors xxiii Preface xxvii 1 Introduction to Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids 1Seyed M.A. Razavi 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 World Market of Hydrocolloids 2 1.3 Hydrocolloids Classification 4 1.4 Functions of Hydrocolloids 8 1.5 Overview of the Chapters 13 1.6 Conclusion 24 References 25 2 Dilute Solution Properties of Emerging Hydrocolloids 53Ali R. Yousefi and Seyed M.A. Razavi 2.1 Introduction 53 2.2 Partial Specific Volume 54 2.3 Hydrogel Content 55 2.4 Molecular Weight 57 2.5 Intrinsic Viscosity 59 2.6 Coil Overlap Parameter and Molecular Conformation 65 2.7 Chain Flexibility Parameter 67 2.8 Stiffness Parameter 68 2.9 Coil Radius and Volume 69 2.10 Voluminosity and Shape Factor 70 2.11 Hydration Parameter 71 2.12 Conclusion and Future Trends 72 References 73 3 Steady Shear Rheological Properties of Emerging Hydrocolloids 81Fataneh Behrouzian and Seyed M.A. Razavi 3.1 Introduction 81 3.2 Time-Independent Rheological Properties 83 3.3 Time-Dependent Rheological Properties 87 3.4 Yield Stress 92 3.5 Cluster Analysis 94 3.6 Conclusion and Future Trend 97 References 97 4 Transient and Dynamic Rheological Properties of Emerging Hydrocolloids 101Ali Alghooneh and Seyed M.A. Razavi 4.1 Introduction 101 4.2 Viscoelastic Characteristics 103 4.3 Cluster Analysis 125 4.4 Conclusion and Future Trends 129 References 131 5 Hydrocolloids Interaction Elaboration Based on Rheological Properties 135Ali Alghooneh, Fataneh Behrouzian, and Seyed M.A. Razavi 5.1 Introduction 135 5.2 Dilute Regime 136 5.3 Concentrated Regime 137 5.4 Thermodynamic 151 5.5 Miscibility 152 5.6 Conclusions and Future Trends 154 References 154 6 Sage(Salvia macrosiphon) Seed Gum 159Seyed M.A. Razavi, Ali Alghooneh, and Fataneh Behrouzian 6.1 Introduction 159 6.2 Salvia macrosiphon Seed Mucilage 160 6.3 Rheological Properties 163 6.4 Textural Properties 177 6.5 Applications 177 6.6 Summary 179 References 179 7 Balangu (Lallemantia royleana) Seed Gum 183Asad Mohammad Amini 7.1 Introduction 183 7.2 Extraction and Purification 184 7.3 Physicochemical and Structural Properties 185 7.4 Rheological Properties 187 7.5 Functional Properties 194 7.6 Conclusions and Future Trends 199 References 200 8 Qodume Shirazi (Alyssum homolocarpum) Seed Gum 205Arash Koocheki and Mohammad Ali Hesarinejad 8.1 Introduction 205 8.2 Gum Extraction Optimization 205 8.3 Physicochemical Properties 207 8.4 Rheological Properties 209 8.5 Biological Activity 212 8.6 Applications 213 8.7 Conclusion and Future Trends 219 References 219 9 Espina Corona (Gleditsia amorphoides) Seed Gum 225María J. Spotti, Martina Perduca, Paula Loyeau, Amelia Rubiolo, and Carlos Carrara 9.1 Introduction 225 9.2 Purification and Composition 226 9.3 Flow Behavior 227 9.4 Viscoelasticity 231 9.5 Applications of ECG in Colloidal Systems 233 9.6 Conclusions and Future Trends 244 References 245 10 Qodume Shahri (Lepidium perfoliatum) Seed Gum 251Arash Koocheki and Mohammad A. Hesarinejad 10.1 Introduction 251 10.2 Gum Extraction Optimization 252 10.3 Chemical Compositions 253 10.4 Functional Properties 253 10.5 Rheological Properties 253 10.6 Applications 259 10.7 Conclusions and Future Trends 267 References 268 11 Persian Gum (Amygdalus scoparia Spach) 273Soleiman Abbasi 11.1 Botanical Aspects and Importance 273 11.2 General Specifications 275 11.3 Production, Collection, and Processing 277 11.4 Physicochemical Properties 278 11.5 Structural Characteristics 279 11.6 Rheological Properties 284 11.7 Interaction with Other Macromolecules 286 11.8 Surface Activity and Emulsifying Properties 290 11.9 Thermal Characteristics 291 11.10 Potential Applications 291 11.11 Concluding Remarks 292 References 293 12 Gum Tragacanth (Astragalus gummifer Labillardiere) 299Zahra Emam-Djomeh, Morteza Fathi, and Gholamreza Askari 12.1 Introduction 299 12.2 Structure 300 12.3 Thermal Properties 306 12.4 Functional Properties 306 12.5 Biological Activity 312 12.6 Antibacterial Activity 312 12.7 Effect of Pre-treatment on GT: Physicochemical Properties 313 12.8 Food Applications 314 12.9 Conclusions and Future Trends 319 References 320 13 Cashew Tree (Anarcadium occidentale L.) Exudate Gum 327Esther Gyedu-Akoto, FrankM. Amoah, and Ibok Oduro 13.1 Introduction 327 13.2 Cashew Tree Gum 328 13.3 Application of Cashew Gum in Foods 336 13.4 Application of Cashew Gum in the Pharmaceutical Industry 339 13.5 Conclusion 342 13.6 Future Trends 342 References 343 14 Brea Tree (Cercidium praecox) Exudate Gum 347María A. Bertuzzi and Aníbal M. Slavutsky 14.1 Introduction 347 14.2 Physicochemical Characteristics 349 14.3 Functional Properties 352 14.4 Applications 358 14.5 Conclusions 364 14.6 Future Trends 365 Acknowledgments 365 References 366 15 Chubak (Acanthophyllum glandulosum) Root Gum 371Hojjat Karazhiyan 15.1 Introduction 371 15.2 Chubak Root Extract (CRE) 372 15.3 Applications of CRE in Foods 374 15.4 Conclusions and Future Trends 388 References 389 16 Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) Flower Gum 397Seyedeh Fatemeh Mousavi, Seyed M.A. Razavi, and Arash Koocheki 16.1 Introduction 397 16.2 Extraction Optimization using RSM 398 16.3 Chemical Compositions 407 16.4 FT-IR 408 16.5 Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) 409 16.6 DPPH Radical-Scavenging Activity 409 16.7 Steady Shear Rheological Properties 411 16.8 Intrinsic Viscosity 416 16.9 Conclusions and Future Trends 417 References 418 17 Opuntia ficus-indica Mucilage 425Elnaz Salehi, Zahra Emam-Djomeh, Morteza Fathi, and Gholamreza Askari 17.1 Introduction 425 17.2 Opuntia ficus-indica Plant Parts 428 17.3 Opuntia ficus-indica Mucilage 431 17.4 Food Applications 441 17.5 Conclusion and Future Trends 443 References 444 18 Emerging Technologies for Isolation of Natural Hydrocolloids from Mucilaginous Seeds 451Asgar Farahnaky, Mahsa Majzoobi, and Shaahin Bakhshizadeh-Shirazi 18.1 Introduction 451 18.2 Mucilaginous Seeds 451 18.3 Mucilage Isolation using Conventional Methods 452 18.4 Emerging Mucilage Isolation Technologies 461 18.5 Conclusions and Future Trends 469 References 469 19 Purification and Fractionation of Novel Natural Hydrocolloids 473Somayeh Razmkhah 19.1 Introduction 473 19.2 Purification of New Natural Hydrocolloids 474 19.3 Fractionation of New Natural Hydrocolloids 482 19.4 Conclusions and Future Trends 494 References 496 20 Improving Texture of Foods using Emerging Hydrocolloids 499Ali Rafe 20.1 Introduction 499 20.2 Influence of Hydrocolloids on Food Structure 499 20.3 Textural Attributes 502 20.4 Tribology (Body–Texture Interaction) 506 20.5 Consumer Perceptions of Food Hydrocolloids 510 20.6 Fractal Analysis 511 20.7 Microstructure of BSG 515 20.8 Conclusions and Future Trends 517 References 518 21 New Hydrocolloids in Ice Cream 525Fatemeh Javidi and Seyed M.A. Razavi 21.1 Introduction 525 21.2 New Sources of Hydrocolloids in Ice Cream 526 21.3 Functions of New Hydrocolloids in Ice Cream 530 21.4 Conclusions 541 21.5 Future Trends 542 References 543 22 Novel Hydrocolloids for Future Progress in Nanotechnology 549Sara Naji-Tabasi 22.1 Introduction 549 22.2 Importance of Finding New Material Sources in Nanotechnology 550 22.3 Nanomaterials 550 22.4 Conclusions and Future Trends 563 References 564 23 Edible/Biodegradable Films and Coatings from Natural Hydrocolloids 571Younes Zahedi 23.1 Introduction 571 23.2 Film Preparation 572 23.3 Film Characteristics 573 23.4 Applications 593 23.5 Conclusions and Future Trends 594 References 595 24 Health Aspects of Novel Hydrocolloids 601Jafar M.Milani and Abdolkhalegh Golkar 24.1 Introduction 601 24.2 Health Benefits of Hydrocolloids 602 24.3 Conclusions and Recommendations 614 References 615 Index 623
About the Editor Seyed M.A. Razavi, is Professor of Food Physics and Engineering at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
The first guide devoted to the functions, structures, and applications of natural hydrocolloids In today's health-conscious climate, the demand for natural food products is growing all the time. Natural hydrocolloids, therefore, have never been more popular. With their thickening, stabilizing, gelling, fat replacing, and binding qualities, these naturally occurring, plant-based polymers can fulfil many of the same functions as commercial ingredients like xanthan, guar, gum Arabic, pectin, and starch. Moreover, certain health benefits have been linked with their often biological active compounds and high-fiber compositions, including potential prebiotic effects and the reduction of blood cholesterol levels. Application of these novel hydrocolloids is, however, still underexplored. Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids aims to remedy this by providing a thorough overview of their structure–function relationships, rheological aspects, and potential utility in mainly the food and pharmaceutical industries. This accessible, quick-reference guide features: A comprehensive and up-to-date survey of the most significant research currently available on natural hydrocolloids Examinations of the major functions and rheological aspects of novel hydrocolloids Information on the potential applications of biopolymers within both foods and pharmaceutical systems Collaborations from an international team of food scientists Emerging Natural Hydrocolloids: Rheology and Functions offers scientists, engineers, technologists, and researchers alike a unique and in-depth account of the uncharted world of novel hydrocolloids, their uses, properties, and potential benefits.

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