Details

Derivatives


Derivatives


CFA Institute Investment Series 1. Aufl.

von: CFA Institute

84,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 04.11.2021
ISBN/EAN: 9781119850588
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 896

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Beschreibungen

<p><b>The complete guide to derivatives, from experts working with CFA Institute</b></p> <p><i>Derivatives</i> is the definitive guide to derivatives and derivative markets. Written by experts working with CFA Institute, this book is an authoritative reference for students and investment professionals interested in the role of derivatives within comprehensive portfolio management. General discussion of the types of derivatives and their characteristics gives way to detailed examination of each market and its contracts, including forwards, futures, options, and swaps, followed by a look at credit derivative markets and their instruments. The companion workbook (sold separately) provides problems and solutions that align with the text and allows students to test their understanding while facilitating deeper internalization of the material.</p> <p>Derivatives have become essential for effective financial risk management and for creating synthetic exposure to asset classes. This book builds a conceptual framework for grasping derivative fundamentals, with systematic coverage and thorough explanations. Readers will:</p> <ul> <li>Understand the different types of derivatives and their characteristics</li> <li>Delve into the various markets and their associated contracts</li> <li>Examine the role of derivatives in portfolio management</li> <li>Learn why derivatives are increasingly fundamental to risk management</li> </ul> <p>CFA Institute is the world's premier association for investment professionals, and the governing body for CFA<sup>®</sup> Program, CIPM<sup>®</sup> Program, CFA Institute ESG Investing Certificate, and Investment Foundations<sup>®</sup> Program. Those seeking a deeper understanding of the markets, mechanisms, and use of derivatives will value the level of expertise CFA Institute brings to the discussion, providing a clear, comprehensive resource for students and professionals alike. Whether used alone or in conjunction with the companion workbook, <i>Derivatives</i> offers a complete course in derivatives and their use in investment management.</p>
<p>Foreword xvii</p> <p>Preface xix</p> <p>Acknowledgments xxi</p> <p>About the CFA Institute Investment Series xxiii</p> <p><b>Chapter 1 Derivative Markets and Instruments 1</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 1</p> <p>1. Derivatives: Introduction, Definitions, and Uses 1</p> <p>2. The Structure of Derivative Markets 5</p> <p>2.1. Exchange-Traded Derivatives Markets 6</p> <p>2.2. Over-the-Counter Derivatives Markets 8</p> <p>3. Types of Derivatives: Introduction, Forward Contracts 10</p> <p>3.1. Forward Commitments 10</p> <p>4. Types of Derivatives: Futures 14</p> <p>5. Types of Derivatives: Swaps 18</p> <p>6. Contingent Claims: Options 22</p> <p>6.1. Options 22</p> <p>7. Contingent Claims: Credit Derivatives 30</p> <p>8. Types of Derivatives: Asset-Backed Securities and Hybrids 33</p> <p>8.1. Hybrids 35</p> <p>9. Derivatives Underlyings 36</p> <p>9.1. Equities 36</p> <p>9.2. Fixed-Income Instruments and Interest Rates 36</p> <p>9.3. Currencies 37</p> <p>9.4. Commodities 37</p> <p>9.5. Credit 37</p> <p>9.6. Other 37</p> <p>10. The Purposes and Benefits of Derivatives 39</p> <p>10.1. Risk Allocation, Transfer, and Management 40</p> <p>10.2. Information Discovery 41</p> <p>10.3. Operational Advantages 41</p> <p>10.4. Market Efficiency 42</p> <p>11. Criticisms and Misuses of Derivatives 42</p> <p>11.1. Speculation and Gambling 43</p> <p>11.2. Destabilization and Systemic Risk 43</p> <p>12. Elementary Principles of Derivative Pricing 45</p> <p>12.1. Storage 46</p> <p>12.2. Arbitrage 47</p> <p>Summary 52</p> <p>Problems 54</p> <p><b>Chapter 2 Basics of Derivative Pricing and Valuation 61</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 61</p> <p>1. Introduction 62</p> <p>2. Basic Derivative Concepts, Pricing the Underlying 62</p> <p>2.1. Basic Derivative Concepts 62</p> <p>2.2. Pricing the Underlying 64</p> <p>3. The Principle of Arbitrage 68</p> <p>3.1. The (In)Frequency of Arbitrage Opportunities 69</p> <p>3.2. Arbitrage and Derivatives 69</p> <p>3.3. Arbitrage and Replication 70</p> <p>3.4. Risk Aversion, Risk Neutrality, and Arbitrage-Free Pricing 71</p> <p>3.5. Limits to Arbitrage 72</p> <p>4. Pricing and Valuation of Forward Contracts: Pricing vs. Valuation; Expiration; Initiation 74</p> <p>4.1. Pricing and Valuation of Forward Commitments 75</p> <p>5. Pricing and Valuation of Forward Contracts: Between Initiation and Expiration; Forward Rate Agreements 79</p> <p>5.1. A Word about Forward Contracts on Interest Rates 80</p> <p>6. Pricing and Valuation of Futures Contracts 82</p> <p>7. Pricing and Valuation of Swap Contracts 84</p> <p>8. Pricing and Valuation of Options 87</p> <p>8.1. European Option Pricing 88</p> <p>9. Lower Limits for Prices of European Options 94</p> <p>10. Put–Call Parity, Put–Call–Forward Parity 97</p> <p>10.1. Put–Call–Forward Parity 101</p> <p>11. Binomial Valuation of Options 103</p> <p>12. American Option Pricing 107</p> <p>Summary 110</p> <p>Problems 111</p> <p><b>Chapter 3 Pricing and Valuation of Forward Commitments 117</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 117</p> <p>1. Introduction to Pricing and Valuation of Forward Commitments 117</p> <p>1.1. Principles of Arbitrage-Free Pricing and Valuation of Forward Commitments 118</p> <p>1.2. Pricing and Valuing Generic Forward and Futures Contracts 119</p> <p>2. Carry Arbitrage 124</p> <p>2.1. Carry Arbitrage Model When There Are No Underlying Cash Flows 124</p> <p>2.2. Carry Arbitrage Model When Underlying Has Cash Flows 131</p> <p>3. Pricing Equity Forwards and Futures 135</p> <p>3.1. Equity Forward and Futures Contracts 135</p> <p>3.2. Interest Rate Forward and Futures Contracts 138</p> <p>4. Pricing Fixed-Income Forward and Futures Contracts 147</p> <p>4.1. Comparing Forward and Futures Contracts 153</p> <p>5. Pricing and Valuing Swap Contracts 154</p> <p>5.1. Interest Rate Swap Contracts 156</p> <p>6. Pricing and Valuing Currency Swap Contracts 163</p> <p>7. Pricing and Valuing Equity Swap Contracts 171</p> <p>Summary 176</p> <p>Problems 179</p> <p><b>Chapter 4 Valuation of Contingent Claims 187</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 187</p> <p>1. Introduction and Principles of a No-Arbitrage Approach to Valuation 188</p> <p>1.1. Principles of a No-Arbitrage Approach to Valuation 188</p> <p>2. Binomial Option Valuation Model 190</p> <p>3. One-Period Binomial Model 192</p> <p>4. Binomial Model: Two-Period (Call Options) 199</p> <p>5. Binomial Model: Two-Period (Put Options) 203</p> <p>6. Binomial Model: Two-Period (Role of Dividends & Comprehensive Example) 207</p> <p>7. Interest Rate Options & Multiperiod Model 213</p> <p>7.1. Multiperiod Model 215</p> <p>8. Black–Scholes–Merton (BSM) Option Valuation Model, Introduction and Assumptions of the BSM Model 216</p> <p>8.1. Introductory Material 216</p> <p>8.2. Assumptions of the BSM Model 216</p> <p>9. BSM Model: Components 218</p> <p>10. BSM Model: Carry Benefits and Applications 222</p> <p>11. Black Option Valuation Model and European Options on Futures 226</p> <p>11.1. European Options on Futures 226</p> <p>12. Interest Rate Options 228</p> <p>13. Swaptions 232</p> <p>14. Option Greeks and Implied Volatility: Delta 234</p> <p>14.1. Delta 235</p> <p>15. Gamma 238</p> <p>16. Theta 241</p> <p>17. Vega 242</p> <p>18. Rho 243</p> <p>19. Implied Volatility 244</p> <p>Summary 247</p> <p>Problems 249</p> <p><b>Chapter 5 Credit Default Swaps 255</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 255</p> <p>1. Introduction 255</p> <p>2. Basic Definitions and Concepts 255</p> <p>2.1. Types of CDS 257</p> <p>3. Important Features of CDS Markets and Instruments, Credit and Succession Events, and Settlement Proposals 258</p> <p>3.1. Credit and Succession Events 260</p> <p>3.2. Settlement Protocols 261</p> <p>3.3. CDS Index Products 262</p> <p>3.4. Market Characteristics 264</p> <p>4. Basics of Valuation and Pricing 265</p> <p>4.1. Basic Pricing Concepts 265</p> <p>4.2. The Credit Curve and CDS Pricing Conventions 268</p> <p>4.3. CDS Pricing Conventions 269</p> <p>4.4. Valuation Changes in CDS during Their Lives 270</p> <p>4.5. Monetizing Gains and Losses 271</p> <p>5. Applications of CDS 272</p> <p>5.1. Managing Credit Exposures 273</p> <p>6. Valuation Differences and Basis Trading 277</p> <p>Summary 279</p> <p>Problems 280</p> <p><b>Chapter 6 Introduction to Commodities and Commodity Derivatives 285</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 285</p> <p>1. Introduction 285</p> <p>2. Commodity Sectors 286</p> <p>2.1. Commodity Sectors 288</p> <p>3. Life Cycle of Commodities 290</p> <p>3.1. Energy 291</p> <p>3.2. Industrial/Precious Metals 292</p> <p>3.3. Livestock 294</p> <p>3.4. Grains 295</p> <p>3.5. Softs 295</p> <p>4. Valuation of Commodities 296</p> <p>5. Commodities Futures Markets: Participants 298</p> <p>5.1. Futures Market Participants 298</p> <p>6. Commodity Spot and Futures Pricing 302</p> <p>7. Theories of Futures Returns 306</p> <p>7.1. Theories of Futures Returns 306</p> <p>8. Components of Futures Returns 313</p> <p>9. Contango, Backwardation, and the Roll Return 317</p> <p>10. Commodity Swaps 320</p> <p>10.1. Total Return Swap 322</p> <p>10.2. Basis Swap 323</p> <p>10.3. Variance Swaps and Volatility Swaps 323</p> <p>11. Commodity Indexes 324</p> <p>11.1. S&P GSCI 327</p> <p>11.2. Bloomberg Commodity Index 327</p> <p>11.3. Deutsche Bank Liquid Commodity Index 327</p> <p>11.4. Thomson Reuters/CoreCommodity CRB Index 327</p> <p>11.5. Rogers International Commodity Index 328</p> <p>11.6. Rebalancing Frequency 328</p> <p>11.7. Commodity Index Summary 328</p> <p>Summary 329</p> <p>References 331</p> <p>Problems 331</p> <p><b>Chapter 7 Currency Management: An Introduction 339</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 339</p> <p>1. Introduction 340</p> <p>2. Review of Foreign Exchange Concepts 340</p> <p>2.1. Spot Markets 341</p> <p>2.2. Forward Markets 343</p> <p>2.3. FX Swap Markets 346</p> <p>2.4. Currency Options 347</p> <p>3. Currency Risk and Portfolio Risk and Return 347</p> <p>3.1. Return Decomposition 347</p> <p>3.2. Volatility Decomposition 350</p> <p>4. Strategic Decisions in Currency Management: Overview 353</p> <p>4.1. The Investment Policy Statement 354</p> <p>4.2. The Portfolio Optimization Problem 354</p> <p>4.3. Choice of Currency Exposures 356</p> <p>5. Strategic Decisions in Currency Management: Spectrum of Currency Risk Management Strategies 359</p> <p>5.1. Passive Hedging 359</p> <p>5.2. Discretionary Hedging 359</p> <p>5.3. Active Currency Management 360</p> <p>5.4. Currency Overlay 360</p> <p>6. Strategic Decisions in Currency Management: Formulating a Currency Management Program 363</p> <p>7. Active Currency Management: Based on Economic Fundamentals, Technical Analysis, and the Carry Trade 365</p> <p>7.1. Active Currency Management Based on Economic Fundamentals 365</p> <p>7.2. Active Currency Management Based on Technical Analysis 367</p> <p>7.3. Active Currency Management Based on the Carry Trade 368</p> <p>8. Active Currency Management: Based on Volatility Trading 370</p> <p>9. Currency Management Tools: Forward Contracts, FX Swaps, and Currency Options 375</p> <p>9.1. Forward Contracts 376</p> <p>9.2. Currency Options 383</p> <p>10. Currency Management Strategies 385</p> <p>10.1. Over-/Under-Hedging Using Forward Contracts 386</p> <p>10.2. Protective Put Using OTM Options 387</p> <p>10.3. Risk Reversal (or Collar) 387</p> <p>10.4. Put Spread 388</p> <p>10.5. Seagull Spread 388</p> <p>10.6. Exotic Options 389</p> <p>10.7. Section Summary 390</p> <p>11. Hedging Multiple Foreign Currencies 393</p> <p>11.1. Cross Hedges and Macro Hedges 393</p> <p>11.2. Minimum-Variance Hedge Ratio 397</p> <p>11.3. Basis Risk 397</p> <p>12. Currency Management Tools and Strategies: A Summary 400</p> <p>13. Currency Management for Emerging Market Currencies 404</p> <p>13.1. Special Considerations in Managing Emerging Market Currency Exposures 404</p> <p>13.2. Non-Deliverable</p> <p>Forwards 406</p> <p>Summary 407</p> <p>References 409</p> <p>Problems 410</p> <p><b>Chapter 8 Options Strategies 421</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 421</p> <p>1. Introduction 422</p> <p>2. Position Equivalencies 422</p> <p>2.1. Synthetic Forward Position 423</p> <p>2.2. Synthetic Put and Call 426</p> <p>3. Covered Calls and Protective Puts 428</p> <p>3.1. Investment Objectives of Covered Calls 428</p> <p>4. Investment Objectives of Protective Puts 436</p> <p>4.1. Loss Protection/Upside Preservation 437</p> <p>4.2. Profit and Loss at Expiration 439</p> <p>5. Equivalence to Long Asset/Short Forward Position 441</p> <p>5.1. Writing Puts 442</p> <p>6. Risk Reduction Using Covered Calls and Protective Puts 444</p> <p>6.1. Covered Calls 445</p> <p>6.2. Protective Puts 445</p> <p>6.3. Buying Calls and Writing Puts on a Short Position 445</p> <p>7. Spreads and Combinations 448</p> <p>7.1. Bull Spreads and Bear Spreads 448</p> <p>8. Straddle 457</p> <p>8.1. Collars 460</p> <p>8.2. Calendar Spread 463</p> <p>9. Implied Volatility and Volatility Skew 465</p> <p>10. Investment Objectives and Strategy Selection 469</p> <p>10.1. The Necessity of Setting an Objective 469</p> <p>10.2. Criteria for Identifying Appropriate Option Strategies 470</p> <p>11. Uses of Options in Portfolio Management 472</p> <p>11.1. Covered Call Writing 472</p> <p>11.2. Put Writing 474</p> <p>11.3. Long Straddle 475</p> <p>11.4. Collar 478</p> <p>11.5. Calendar Spread 478</p> <p>12. Hedging an Expected Increase in Equity Market Volatility 480</p> <p>12.1. Establishing or Modifying Equity Risk Exposure 482</p> <p>Summary 485</p> <p>Problems 487</p> <p><b>Chapter 9 Swaps, Forwards, and Futures Strategies 493</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 493</p> <p>1. Managing Interest Rate Risk with Swaps 493</p> <p>1.1. Changing Risk Exposures with Swaps, Futures, and Forwards 494</p> <p>2. Managing Interest Rate Risk with Forwards, Futures, and Fixed-Income</p> <p>Futures 498</p> <p>2.1. Fixed-Income Futures 500</p> <p>3. Managing Currency Exposure 506</p> <p>3.1. Currency Swaps 506</p> <p>3.2. Currency Forwards and Futures 510</p> <p>4. Managing Equity Risk 511</p> <p>4.1. Equity Swaps 511</p> <p>4.2. Equity Forwards and Futures 513</p> <p>4.3. Cash Equitization 516</p> <p>5. Volatility Derivatives: Futures and Options 517</p> <p>5.1. Volatility Futures and Options 518</p> <p>6. Volatility Derivatives: Variance Swaps 520</p> <p>7. Using Derivatives to Manage Equity Exposure and Tracking Error 523</p> <p>7.1. Cash Equitization 524</p> <p>8. Using Derivatives in Asset Allocation 525</p> <p>8.1. Changing Allocations between Asset Classes Using Futures 525</p> <p>8.2. Rebalancing an Asset Allocation Using Futures 528</p> <p>8.3. Changing Allocations between Asset Classes Using Swaps 529</p> <p>9. Using Derivatives to Infer Market Expectations 531</p> <p>9.1. Using Fed Funds Futures to Infer the Expected Average Federal Funds Rate 531</p> <p>9.2. Inferring Market Expectations 533</p> <p>Summary 534</p> <p>Problems 535</p> <p><b>Chapter 10 Introduction to Risk Management 543</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 543</p> <p>1. Introduction 543</p> <p>2. The Risk Management Process 545</p> <p>3. The Risk Management Framework 547</p> <p>4. Risk Governance − An Enterprise View 554</p> <p>4.1. An Enterprise View of Risk Governance 554</p> <p>5. Risk Tolerance 556</p> <p>6. Risk Budgeting 558</p> <p>7. Identification of Risk − Financial and Non-Financial Risk 561</p> <p>7.1. Financial Risks 561</p> <p>7.2. Non-Financial Risks 563</p> <p>8. Identification of Risk − Interactions Between Risks 567</p> <p>9. Measuring and Modifying Risk − Drivers and Metrics 571</p> <p>9.1. Drivers 571</p> <p>9.2. Metrics 572</p> <p>10. Methods of Risk Modification − Prevention, Avoidance, and Acceptance 576</p> <p>10.1. Risk Prevention and Avoidance 577</p> <p>10.2. Risk Acceptance: Self-Insurance and Diversification 578</p> <p>11. Methods of Risk Modification − Transfer, Shifting, Choosing a Method for Modifying 579</p> <p>11.1. Risk Shifting 581</p> <p>11.2. How to Choose Which Method for Modifying Risk 583</p> <p>Summary 585</p> <p>Problems 587</p> <p><b>Chapter 11 Measuring and Managing Market Risk 591</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 591</p> <p>1. Introduction 592</p> <p>1.1. Understanding Value at Risk 592</p> <p>2. Estimating VaR 596</p> <p>3. The Parametric Method of VaR Estimation 598</p> <p>4. The Historical Simulation Method of VaR Estimation 602</p> <p>5. The Monte Carlo Simulation Method of VaR Estimation 605</p> <p>6. Advantages and Limitations of VaR and Extensions of VaR 608</p> <p>6.1. Advantages of VaR 608</p> <p>6.2. Limitations of VaR 609</p> <p>6.3. Extensions of VaR 611</p> <p>7. Other Key Risk Measures − Sensitivity Risk Measures; Sensitivity RiskMeasures 613</p> <p>7.1. Sensitivity Risk Measures 614</p> <p>8. Scenario Risk Measures 618</p> <p>8.1. Historical Scenarios 618</p> <p>8.2. Hypothetical Scenarios 620</p> <p>9. Sensitivity and Scenario Risk Measures and VaR 623</p> <p>9.1. Advantages and Limitations of Sensitivity Risk Measures and Scenario Risk Measures 624</p> <p>10. Using Constraints in Market Risk Management 627</p> <p>10.1. Risk Budgeting 628</p> <p>10.2. Position Limits 629</p> <p>10.3. Scenario Limits 629</p> <p>10.4. Stop-Loss Limits 630</p> <p>10.5. Risk Measures and Capital Allocation 630</p> <p>11. Applications of Risk Measures 632</p> <p>11.1. Market Participants and the Different Risk Measures They Use 632</p> <p>12. Pension Funds and Insurers 637</p> <p>12.1. Insurers 639</p> <p>Summary 641</p> <p>Reference 643</p> <p>Problems 643</p> <p><b>Chapter 12 Risk Management for Individuals 651</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 651</p> <p>1. Introduction 652</p> <p>2. Human Capital, Financial Capital, and Economic Net Worth 652</p> <p>2.1. Human Capital 653</p> <p>2.2. Financial Capital 656</p> <p>2.3. Economic Net Worth 661</p> <p>3. A Framework for Individual Risk Management 661</p> <p>3.1. The Risk Management Strategy for Individuals 661</p> <p>3.2. Financial Stages of Life 662</p> <p>4. The Individual Balance Sheet 665</p> <p>4.1. Traditional Balance Sheet 665</p> <p>4.2. Economic (Holistic) Balance Sheet 666</p> <p>4.3. Changes in Economic Net Worth 668</p> <p>5. Individual Risk Exposures 671</p> <p>5.1. Earnings Risk 671</p> <p>5.2. Premature Death Risk 672</p> <p>5.3. Longevity Risk 673</p> <p>5.4. Property Risk 674</p> <p>5.5. Liability Risk 674</p> <p>5.6. Health Risk 675</p> <p>6. Life Insurance: Uses, Types, and Elements 676</p> <p>6.1. Life Insurance 677</p> <p>7. Life Insurance: Pricing, Policy Cost Comparison, and Determining Amount Needed 680</p> <p>7.1. Mortality Expectations 680</p> <p>7.2. Calculation of the Net Premium and Gross Premium 682</p> <p>7.3. Cash Values and Policy Reserves 684</p> <p>7.4. Consumer Comparisons of Life Insurance Costs 685</p> <p>7.5. How Much Life Insurance Does One Need? 687</p> <p>8. Other Types of Insurance 688</p> <p>8.1. Property Insurance 690</p> <p>8.2. Health/Medical Insurance 692</p> <p>8.3. Liability Insurance 693</p> <p>8.4. Other Types of Insurance 693</p> <p>9. Annuities: Types, Structure, and Classification 694</p> <p>9.1. Parties to an Annuity Contract 694</p> <p>9.2. Classification of Annuities 695</p> <p>10. Annuities: Advantages and Disadvantages of Fixed and Variable Annuities 698</p> <p>10.1. Volatility of Benefit Amount 698</p> <p>10.2. Flexibility 699</p> <p>10.3. Future Market Expectations 699</p> <p>10.4. Fees 700</p> <p>10.5. Inflation Concerns 700</p> <p>10.6. Payout Methods 700</p> <p>10.7. Annuity Benefit Taxation 701</p> <p>10.8. Appropriateness of Annuities 701</p> <p>11. Risk Management Implementation: Determining the Optimal Strategy and Case Analysis 703</p> <p>11.1. Determining the Optimal Risk Management Strategy 703</p> <p>11.2. Analyzing an Insurance Program 705</p> <p>12. The Effect of Human Capital on Asset Allocation and Risk Reduction 712</p> <p>12.1. Asset Allocation and Risk Reduction 716</p> <p>Summary 718</p> <p>References 720</p> <p>Problems 720</p> <p><b>Chapter 13 Case Study in Risk Management: Private Wealth 727</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 727</p> <p>1. Introduction and Case Background 727</p> <p>1.1. Background of Eurolandia 728</p> <p>1.2. The Schmitt Family in Their Early Career Stage 730</p> <p>2. Identification and Analysis of Risk Exposures: Early Career Stage 731</p> <p>2.1. Specify the Schmitts’ Financial Objectives 731</p> <p>2.2. Identification of Risk Exposures 732</p> <p>2.3. Analysis of Identified Risk 734</p> <p>3. Risk Management Recommendations: Early Career Stage 736</p> <p>3.1. Recommendations for Managing Risks 736</p> <p>3.2. Monitoring Outcomes and Risk Exposures 739</p> <p>4. Risk Management Considerations Associated with Home Purchase 740</p> <p>4.1. Review of Risk Management Arrangements Following the House Purchase 740</p> <p>5. Identification and Analysis of Risk Exposures: Career Development Stage 742</p> <p>5.1. Case Facts: The Schmitts Are 45 742</p> <p>5.2. Financial Objectives in the Career Development Stage 744</p> <p>5.3. Identification and Evaluation of Risks in the Career Development Stage 745</p> <p>6. Risk Management Recommendations: Career Development Stage 748</p> <p>6.1. Disability Insurance 748</p> <p>6.2. Life Insurance 748</p> <p>6.3. Investment Risk Recommendations 751</p> <p>6.4. Retirement Planning Recommendation 752</p> <p>6.5. Additional Suggestions 752</p> <p>7. Identification and Analysis of Risk Exposures: Peak Accumulation Stage 753</p> <p>7.1. Review of Objectives, Risks, and Methods of Addressing Them 754</p> <p>8. Assessment of and Recommendations concerning Risk to Retirement Lifestyle and Bequest Goals: Peak Accumulation Stage 759</p> <p>8.1. Analysis of Investment Portfolio 762</p> <p>8.2. Analysis of Asset Allocation 764</p> <p>8.3. Recommendations for Risk Management at Peak Accumulation Stage 765</p> <p>9. Identification and Analysis of Retirement Objectives, Assets, and Drawdown Plan: Retirement Stage 766</p> <p>9.1. Key Issues and Objectives 767</p> <p>9.2. Analysis of Retirement Assets and Drawdown Plan 767</p> <p>10. Income and Investment Portfolio Recommendations: Retirement Stage 769</p> <p>10.1. Investment Portfolio Analysis and Recommendations 770</p> <p>10.2. The Advisor’s Recommendations for Investment Portfolio in Retirement 771</p> <p>Summary 772</p> <p>Problems 773</p> <p><b>Chapter 14 Integrated Cases in Risk Management: Institutional 777</b></p> <p>Learning Outcomes 777</p> <p>1. Introduction 777</p> <p>2. Financial Risks Faced by Institutional Investors 778</p> <p>2.1. Long-Term Perspective 778</p> <p>2.2. Dimensions of Financial Risk Management 778</p> <p>2.3. Risk Considerations for Long-Term Investors 781</p> <p>2.4. Risks Associated with Illiquid Asset Classes 783</p> <p>2.5. Managing Liquidity Risk 787</p> <p>2.6. Enterprise Risk Management for Institutional Investors 788</p> <p>3. Environmental and Social Risks Faced by Institutional Investors 790</p> <p>3.1. Universal Ownership, Externalities, and Responsible Investing 790</p> <p>3.2. Material Environmental Issues for an Institutional Investor 792</p> <p>3.3. Material Social Issues for an Institutional Investor 797</p> <p>References 831</p> <p>Glossary 833</p> <p>About the Editors and Authors 845</p> <p>Index 849 </p>
<b>CFA Institute</b> is the global association of investment professionals that sets the standard for professional excellence and credentials. The organization is a champion for ethical behavior in investment markets and a respected source of knowledge in the global financial community. The end goal: to create an environment where investors’ interests come first, markets function at their best, and economies grow. CFA Institute has more than 170,000 members in 160+ countries and territories, including 163,000 CFA<sup style="font-family: Arial;">®</sup>; charterholders, and 150+ member societies. For more information, visit www.cfainstitute.org.
<p><b>About the <i>CFA Institute Investment Series </i></b></p> <p>Designed for both students and investment professionals, the <i>CFA Institute Investment Series </i>distills core topics from the CFA<sup>®</sup> Program Curriculum into digestible, practice-oriented texts and companion workbooks. Each book in the series offers the latest comprehensive coverage on concepts essential to portfolio management and the wider investment industry. The titles in this series are developed to help readers not only understand key learning objectives, but also apply the material with hands-on exercises connecting theory with real investment practice. <p>Written by experts working with CFA Institute, this book includes all the information learners need to develop a fundamental understanding of derivatives and derivative markets. To enhance your mastery of the tools and techniques covered in <i>Derivatives,</i> don’t forget to pick up <i>Derivatives Workbook</i> for added practice with specific learning outcomes, summary overview sections, and challenging questions. <p><b>About CFA Institute </b> <p>CFA Institute is the global association of investment professionals that sets the standard for professional excellence and credentials. The organization is a champion for ethical behavior in investment markets and a respected source of knowledge in the global financial community. The end goal: to create an environment where investors’ interests come first, markets function at their best, and economies grow. CFA Institute has more than 170,000 members in 160+ countries and territories, including 163,000 CFA<sup>®</sup> charterholders, and 150+ member societies. For more information, visit <b>www.cfainstitute.org.</B>
<p><b>CFA Institute</b></p> <p><b>CFA INSTITUTE INVESTMENT SERIES</B> <p><b>The complete guide to derivatives, from experts working with CFA Institute</b> <p><i>Derivatives</i> is the definitive guide to derivatives and derivative markets. Written by experts working with CFA Institute, this book is an authoritative reference for students and investment professionals interested in the role of derivatives within comprehensive portfolio management. General discussion of the types of derivatives and their characteristics gives way to detailed examination of each market and its contracts, including forwards, futures, options, and swaps, followed by a look at credit derivative markets and their instruments. The companion workbook (sold separately) provides problems and solutions that align with the text and allows students to test their understanding while facilitating deeper internalization of the material. <p>Derivatives have become essential for effective financial risk management and for creating synthetic exposure to asset classes. This book builds a conceptual framework for grasping derivative fundamentals, with systematic coverage and thorough explanations. Readers will: <ul><li>Understand the different types of derivatives and their characteristics</li> <li>Delve into the various markets and their associated contracts</li> <li>Examine the role of derivatives in portfolio management</li> <li>Learn why derivatives are increasingly fundamental to risk management</li></ul> <p>CFA Institute is the world’s premier association for investment professionals, and the governing body for the CFA<sup>®</sup> Program, CIPM<sup>®</sup> Program, CFA Institute ESG Investing Certificate, and Investment Foundations<sup>®</sup> Program. Those seeking a deeper understanding of the markets, mechanisms, and use of derivatives will value the level of expertise CFA Institute brings to the discussion, providing a clear, comprehensive resource for students and professionals alike. Whether used alone or in conjunction with the companion workbook, <i>Derivatives</i> offers a complete course in derivatives and their use in investment management.

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