Details

Cybersecurity For Dummies


Cybersecurity For Dummies


2. Aufl.

von: Joseph Steinberg

19,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 21.03.2022
ISBN/EAN: 9781119867203
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 416

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

<p><b>Explore the latest developments in cybersecurity with this essential guide</b> <p>Every day it seems we read another story about one company or another being targeted by cybercriminals. It makes some of us wonder: am I safe online? The good news is that we can all be cybersecure&mdash;and it doesn&rsquo;t take a degree in computer science to make it happen! <p><i>Cybersecurity For Dummies </i>is the down-to-earth guide you need to secure your own data (and your company&rsquo;s, too). You&rsquo;ll get step-by-step guidance on how to implement reasonable security measures, prevent cyber attacks, deal securely with remote work, and what to do in the event that your information is compromised. <p>The book also offers: <ul> <li>Updated directions on how to prevent ransomware attacks and how to handle the situation if you become a target</li> <li>Step-by-step instructions on how to create data backups and implement strong encryption</li> <li>Basic info that every aspiring cybersecurity professional needs to know</li></ul><p><i>Cybersecurity For Dummies </i>is the ideal handbook for anyone considering a career transition into cybersecurity, as well as anyone seeking to secure sensitive information.
<p><b>I</b><b>ntroduction </b><b>1</b></p> <p>About This Book 1</p> <p>Foolish Assumptions 3</p> <p>Icons Used in This Book 4</p> <p>Beyond the Book 4</p> <p>Where to Go from Here 4</p> <p><b>Part 1: Getting Started With Cybersecurity</b><b> 5</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 1: What Exactly Is Cybersecurity?</b><b> 7</b></p> <p>Cybersecurity Means Different Things to Different Folks 7</p> <p>Cybersecurity Is a Constantly Moving Target 9</p> <p>Technological changes 9</p> <p>Social shifts 14</p> <p>Economic model shifts 15</p> <p>Political shifts 16</p> <p>Looking at the Risks Cybersecurity Mitigates 20</p> <p>The goal of cybersecurity: The CIA Triad 21</p> <p>From a human perspective 22</p> <p><b>Chapter 2: Getting to Know Common Cyberattacks</b><b> 23</b></p> <p>Attacks That Inflict Damage 24</p> <p>Denial-of-service (DoS) attacks 24</p> <p>Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks 24</p> <p>Botnets and zombies 26</p> <p>Data destruction attacks 27</p> <p>Is That Really You? Impersonation 27</p> <p>Phishing 28</p> <p>Spear phishing 28</p> <p>CEO fraud 28</p> <p>Smishing 29</p> <p>Vishing 29</p> <p>Pharming 29</p> <p>Whaling: Going for the &ldquo;big fish&rdquo; 29</p> <p>Messing around with Other People&rsquo;s Stuff: Tampering 30</p> <p>Captured in Transit: Interception 30</p> <p>Man-in-the-middle attacks 31</p> <p>Taking What Isn&rsquo;t Theirs: Data Theft 32</p> <p>Personal data theft 32</p> <p>Business data theft 32</p> <p>Data exfiltration 33</p> <p>Compromised credentials 33</p> <p>Forced policy violations 34</p> <p>Cyberbombs That Sneak into Your Devices: Malware 34</p> <p>Viruses 34</p> <p>Worms 35</p> <p>Trojans 35</p> <p>Ransomware 35</p> <p>Scareware 36</p> <p>Spyware 37</p> <p>Cryptocurrency miners 37</p> <p>Adware 37</p> <p>Blended malware 38</p> <p>Zero-day malware 38</p> <p>Fake malware on computers 38</p> <p>Fake malware on mobile devices 38</p> <p>Fake security subscription renewal notifications 39</p> <p>Poisoned Web Service Attacks 39</p> <p>Network Infrastructure Poisoning 40</p> <p>Malvertising 40</p> <p>Drive-by downloads 41</p> <p>Stealing passwords 41</p> <p>Exploiting Maintenance Difficulties 43</p> <p>Advanced Attacks 43</p> <p>Opportunistic attacks 44</p> <p>Targeted attacks 44</p> <p>Blended (opportunistic and targeted) attacks 45</p> <p>Some Technical Attack Techniques 45</p> <p>Rootkits 45</p> <p>Brute-force attacks 46</p> <p>Injection attacks 46</p> <p>Session hijacking 47</p> <p>Malformed URL attacks 47</p> <p>Buffer overflow attacks 48</p> <p><b>Chapter 3: The Bad Guys You Must Defend Against</b><b> 49</b></p> <p>Bad Guys and Good Guys Are Relative Terms 50</p> <p>Bad Guys Up to No Good 51</p> <p>Script kiddies 51</p> <p>Kids who are not kiddies 52</p> <p>Terrorists and other rogue groups 52</p> <p>Nations and states 52</p> <p>Corporate spies 54</p> <p>Criminals 54</p> <p>Hacktivists 54</p> <p>Cyberattackers and Their Colored Hats 55</p> <p>How Cybercriminals Monetize Their Actions 56</p> <p>Direct financial fraud 56</p> <p>Indirect financial fraud 57</p> <p>Ransomware 59</p> <p>Cryptominers 60</p> <p>Not All Dangers Come From Attackers: Dealing with Nonmalicious Threats 60</p> <p>Human error 60</p> <p>External disasters 62</p> <p>Defending against These Attackers 67</p> <p><b>Part 2: Improving Your Own Personal Security</b><b> 69</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 4: Evaluating Your Current Cybersecurity Posture</b><b> 71</b></p> <p>Don&rsquo;t be Achilles: Identifying Ways You May Be Less than Secure 71</p> <p>Your home computer(s) 72</p> <p>Your mobile devices 73</p> <p>Your Internet of Things (IoT) devices 73</p> <p>Your networking equipment 74</p> <p>Your work environment 74</p> <p>Identifying Risks 74</p> <p>Protecting against Risks 75</p> <p>Perimeter defense 76</p> <p>Firewall/router 76</p> <p>Security software 79</p> <p>Your physical computer(s) and any other endpoints 79</p> <p>Backups 79</p> <p>Detecting 80</p> <p>Responding 80</p> <p>Recovering 80</p> <p>Improving 80</p> <p>Evaluating Your Current Security Measures 80</p> <p>Software 81</p> <p>Hardware 82</p> <p>Insurance 83</p> <p>Education 83</p> <p>Privacy 101 84</p> <p>Think before you share 84</p> <p>Think before you post 85</p> <p>General privacy tips 86</p> <p>Banking Online Safely 88</p> <p>Safely Using Smart Devices 90</p> <p>Cryptocurrency Security 101 91</p> <p><b>Chapter 5: Enhancing Physical Security</b><b> 93</b></p> <p>Understanding Why Physical Security Matters 94</p> <p>Taking Inventory 94</p> <p>Stationary devices 96</p> <p>Mobile devices 97</p> <p>Locating Your Vulnerable Data 97</p> <p>Creating and Executing a Physical Security Plan 98</p> <p>Implementing Physical Security 100</p> <p>Security for Mobile Devices 101</p> <p>Realizing That Insiders Pose the Greatest Risks 102</p> <p><b>Chapter 6: Cybersecurity Considerations When Working from Home</b><b> 105</b></p> <p>Network Security Concerns 106</p> <p>Device Security Concerns 108</p> <p>Location Cybersecurity 109</p> <p>Shoulder surfing 109</p> <p>Eavesdropping 110</p> <p>Theft 110</p> <p>Human errors 110</p> <p>Video Conferencing Cybersecurity 111</p> <p>Keep private stuff out of camera view 111</p> <p>Keep video conferences secure from unauthorized visitors 111</p> <p>Social Engineering Issues 113</p> <p>Regulatory Issues 113</p> <p><b>Part 3: Protecting Yourself From Yourself</b><b> 115</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 7: Securing Your Accounts</b><b> 117</b></p> <p>Realizing You&rsquo;re a Target 117</p> <p>Securing Your External Accounts 118</p> <p>Securing Data Associated with User Accounts 119</p> <p>Conduct business with reputable parties 119</p> <p>Use official apps and websites 120</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t install software from untrusted parties 120</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t root your phone 120</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t provide unnecessary sensitive information 120</p> <p>Use payment services that eliminate the need to share credit card numbers 120</p> <p>Use one-time, virtual credit card numbers when appropriate 121</p> <p>Monitor your accounts 122</p> <p>Report suspicious activity ASAP 122</p> <p>Employ a proper password strategy 122</p> <p>Utilize multifactor authentication 122</p> <p>Log out when you&rsquo;re finished 124</p> <p>Use your own computer or phone 124</p> <p>Lock your computer 124</p> <p>Use a separate, dedicated computer for sensitive tasks 125</p> <p>Use a separate, dedicated browser for sensitive web-based tasks 125</p> <p>Secure your access devices 125</p> <p>Keep your devices up to date 125</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t perform sensitive tasks over public Wi-Fi 125</p> <p>Never use public Wi-Fi in high-risk places 126</p> <p>Access your accounts only in safe locations 126</p> <p>Use appropriate devices 126</p> <p>Set appropriate limits 126</p> <p>Use alerts 127</p> <p>Periodically check access device lists 127</p> <p>Check last login info 127</p> <p>Respond appropriately to any fraud alerts 127</p> <p>Never send sensitive information over an unencrypted connection 127</p> <p>Beware of social engineering attacks 128</p> <p>Establish voice login passwords 129</p> <p>Protect your cellphone number 129</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t click on links in emails or text messages 129</p> <p>Securing Data with Parties You&rsquo;ve Interacted With 130</p> <p>Securing Data at Parties You Haven&rsquo;t Interacted With 132</p> <p>Securing Data by Not Connecting Hardware with Unknown Pedigrees 133</p> <p><b>Chapter 8: Passwords</b><b> 135</b></p> <p>Passwords: The Primary Form of Authentication 135</p> <p>Avoiding Simplistic Passwords 136</p> <p>Password Considerations 137</p> <p>Easily guessable personal passwords 137</p> <p>Complicated passwords aren&rsquo;t always better 138</p> <p>Different levels of sensitivity 138</p> <p>Your most sensitive passwords may not be the ones you think 139</p> <p>You can reuse passwords &mdash; sometimes 139</p> <p>Consider using a password manager 140</p> <p>Creating Memorable, Strong Passwords 142</p> <p>Knowing When to Change Passwords 143</p> <p>Changing Passwords after a Breach 144</p> <p>Providing Passwords to Humans 144</p> <p>Storing Passwords 145</p> <p>Storing passwords for your heirs 145</p> <p>Storing general passwords 145</p> <p>Transmitting Passwords 146</p> <p>Discovering Alternatives to Passwords 146</p> <p>Biometric authentication 146</p> <p>SMS-based authentication 148</p> <p>App-based one-time passwords 149</p> <p>Hardware token authentication 149</p> <p>USB-based authentication 150</p> <p><b>Chapter 9: Preventing Social Engineering Attacks</b><b> 151</b></p> <p>Don&rsquo;t Trust Technology More than You Would People 151</p> <p>Types of Social Engineering Attacks 152</p> <p>Six Principles Social Engineers Exploit 156</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t Overshare on Social Media 156</p> <p>Your schedule and travel plans 157</p> <p>Financial information 158</p> <p>Personal information 158</p> <p>Work information 160</p> <p>Possible cybersecurity issues 160</p> <p>Crimes and minor infractions 160</p> <p>Medical or legal advice 160</p> <p>Your location 161</p> <p>Your birthday 161</p> <p>Your &ldquo;sins&rdquo; 161</p> <p>Leaking Data by Sharing Information as Part of Viral Trends 162</p> <p>Identifying Fake Social Media Connections 162</p> <p>Photo 163</p> <p>Verification 163</p> <p>Friends or connections in common 163</p> <p>Relevant posts 164</p> <p>Number of connections 164</p> <p>Industry and location 165</p> <p>Similar people 165</p> <p>Duplicate contact 165</p> <p>Contact details 165</p> <p>Premium status 166</p> <p>LinkedIn endorsements 166</p> <p>Group activity 166</p> <p>Appropriate levels of relative usage 167</p> <p>Human activities 167</p> <p>Clich&eacute; names 167</p> <p>Poor contact information 168</p> <p>Skill sets 168</p> <p>Spelling 168</p> <p>Age of an account 168</p> <p>Suspicious career or life path 168</p> <p>Level or celebrity status 169</p> <p>Using Bogus Information 170</p> <p>Using Security Software 170</p> <p>General Cyberhygiene Can Help Prevent Social Engineering 171</p> <p><b>Part 4: Cybersecurity for Businesses, Organizations, and Government </b><b>173</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 10: Securing Your Small Business</b><b> 175</b></p> <p>Making Sure Someone Is In Charge 175</p> <p>Watching Out for Employees 176</p> <p>Incentivize employees 177</p> <p>Avoid giving out the keys to the castle 177</p> <p>Give everyone separate credentials 178</p> <p>Restrict administrators 178</p> <p>Limit access to corporate accounts 178</p> <p>Implement employee policies 180</p> <p>Enforce social media policies 183</p> <p>Monitor employees 183</p> <p>Dealing with a Remote Workforce 184</p> <p>Use work devices and separate work networks 185</p> <p>Set up virtual private networks 185</p> <p>Create standardized communication protocols 186</p> <p>Use a known network 186</p> <p>Determine how backups are handled 187</p> <p>Be careful where you work remotely 187</p> <p>Be extra vigilant regarding social engineering 188</p> <p>Considering Cybersecurity Insurance 189</p> <p>Complying with Regulations and Compliance 190</p> <p>Protecting employee data 190</p> <p>PCI DSS 191</p> <p>Breach disclosure laws 191</p> <p>GDPR 192</p> <p>HIPAA 192</p> <p>Biometric data 193</p> <p>Anti-money laundering laws 193</p> <p>International sanctions 193</p> <p>Handling Internet Access 193</p> <p>Segregate Internet access for personal devices 193</p> <p>Create bring your own device (BYOD) policies 194</p> <p>Properly handle inbound access 194</p> <p>Protect against denial-of-service attacks 196</p> <p>Use https 197</p> <p>Use a VPN 197</p> <p>Run penetration tests 197</p> <p>Be careful with IoT devices 197</p> <p>Use multiple network segments 198</p> <p>Be careful with payment cards 198</p> <p>Managing Power Issues 198</p> <p><b>Chapter 11: Cybersecurity and Big Businesses</b><b> 201</b></p> <p>Utilizing Technological Complexity 202</p> <p>Managing Custom Systems 202</p> <p>Continuity Planning and Disaster Recovery 203</p> <p>Looking at Regulations 203</p> <p>Sarbanes Oxley 203</p> <p>Stricter PCI requirements 205</p> <p>Public company data disclosure rules 205</p> <p>Breach disclosures 205</p> <p>Industry-specific regulators and rules 206</p> <p>Fiduciary responsibilities 206</p> <p>Deep pockets 207</p> <p>Deeper Pockets &mdash; and Insured 207</p> <p>Considering Employees, Consultants, and Partners 208</p> <p>Dealing with internal politics 209</p> <p>Offering information security training 209</p> <p>Replicated environments 209</p> <p>Looking at the Chief Information Security Officer&rsquo;s Role 210</p> <p>Overall security program management 210</p> <p>Test and measurement of the security program 210</p> <p>Human risk management 211</p> <p>Information asset classification and control 211</p> <p>Security operations 211</p> <p>Information security strategy 211</p> <p>Identity and access management 211</p> <p>Data loss prevention 212</p> <p>Fraud prevention 212</p> <p>Incident response plan 213</p> <p>Disaster recovery and business continuity planning 213</p> <p>Compliance 213</p> <p>Investigations 213</p> <p>Physical security 214</p> <p>Security architecture 214</p> <p>Geopolitical risks 214</p> <p>Ensuring auditability of system administrators 215</p> <p>Cybersecurity insurance compliance 215</p> <p><b>Part 5: Handling a Security Incident (This Is a When, Not an If)</b><b> 217</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 12: Identifying a Security Breach</b><b> 219</b></p> <p>Identifying Overt Breaches 220</p> <p>Ransomware 220</p> <p>Defacement 221</p> <p>Claimed destruction 221</p> <p>Detecting Covert Breaches 222</p> <p>Your device seems slower than before 223</p> <p>Your Task Manager doesn&rsquo;t run 223</p> <p>Your Registry Editor doesn&rsquo;t run 223</p> <p>Your device starts suffering from latency issues 224</p> <p>Your device starts suffering from communication and buffering issues 225</p> <p>Your device&rsquo;s settings have changed 226</p> <p>Your device is sending or receiving strange email messages 226</p> <p>Your device is sending or receiving strange text messages 226</p> <p>New software (including apps) is installed on your device &mdash; and you didn&rsquo;t install it 226</p> <p>Your device&rsquo;s battery seems to drain more quickly than before 227</p> <p>Your device seems to run hotter than before 227</p> <p>File contents have been changed 228</p> <p>Files are missing 228</p> <p>Websites appear different than before 228</p> <p>Your Internet settings show a proxy, and you never set one up 228</p> <p>Some programs (or apps) stop working properly 229</p> <p>Security programs have turned off 229</p> <p>An increased use of data or text messaging (SMS) 230</p> <p>Increased network traffic 230</p> <p>Unusual open ports 230</p> <p>Your device starts crashing 231</p> <p>Your cellphone bill shows unexpected charges up to here 232</p> <p>Unknown programs request access 232</p> <p>External devices power on unexpectedly 232</p> <p>Your device acts as if someone else were using it 232</p> <p>New browser search engine default 232</p> <p>Your device password has changed 233</p> <p>Pop-ups start appearing 233</p> <p>New browser add-ons appear 233</p> <p>New browser home page 234</p> <p>Your email from the device is getting blocked by spam filters 234</p> <p>Your device is attempting to access &ldquo;bad&rdquo; sites 234</p> <p>You&rsquo;re experiencing unusual service disruptions 234</p> <p>Your device&rsquo;s language settings changed 235</p> <p>You see unexplained activity on the device 235</p> <p>You see unexplained online activity 235</p> <p>Your device suddenly restarts 235</p> <p>You see signs of data breaches and/or leaks 236</p> <p>You are routed to the wrong website 236</p> <p>Your hard drive or SSD light never seems to turn off 236</p> <p>Other abnormal things happen 237</p> <p><b>Chapter 13: Recovering from a Security Breach</b><b> 239</b></p> <p>An Ounce of Prevention Is Worth Many Tons of Response 239</p> <p>Stay Calm and Act Now with Wisdom 240</p> <p>Bring in a Pro 240</p> <p>Recovering from a Breach without a Pro&rsquo;s Help 241</p> <p>Step 1: Figure out what happened or is happening 241</p> <p>Step 2: Contain the attack 242</p> <p>Step 3: Terminate and eliminate the attack 243</p> <p>Reinstall Damaged Software 247</p> <p>Restart the system and run an updated security scan 247</p> <p>Erase all potentially problematic System Restore points 248</p> <p>Restore modified settings 248</p> <p>Rebuild the system 249</p> <p>Dealing with Stolen Information 250</p> <p>Paying ransoms 251</p> <p>Learning for the future 253</p> <p>Recovering When Your Data Is Compromised at a Third Party 253</p> <p>Reason the notice was sent 254</p> <p>Scams 254</p> <p>Passwords 255</p> <p>Payment card information 256</p> <p>Government-issued documents 256</p> <p>School or employer-issued documents 257</p> <p>Social media accounts 257</p> <p><b>Part 6: Backing Up and Recovery</b><b> 259</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 14: Backing Up</b><b> 261</b></p> <p>Backing Up Is a Must 261</p> <p>Backing Up Data from Apps and Online Accounts 262</p> <p>SMS texts 263</p> <p>Social media 263</p> <p>WhatsApp 264</p> <p>Google Photos 264</p> <p>Other apps 264</p> <p>Backing Up Data on Smartphones 265</p> <p>Android 265</p> <p>Apple 265</p> <p>Conducting Cryptocurrency Backups 267</p> <p>Backing Up Passwords 267</p> <p>Looking at the Different Types of Backups 267</p> <p>Full backups of systems 267</p> <p>Original system images 269</p> <p>Later system images 269</p> <p>Original installation media 269</p> <p>Downloaded software 270</p> <p>Full backups of data 270</p> <p>Incremental backups 271</p> <p>Differential backups 271</p> <p>Mixed backups 272</p> <p>Continuous backups 272</p> <p>Partial backups 273</p> <p>Folder backups 273</p> <p>Drive backups 274</p> <p>Virtual drive backups 274</p> <p>Exclusions 275</p> <p>In-app backups 276</p> <p>Figuring Out How Often You Should Backup 277</p> <p>Exploring Backup Tools 278</p> <p>Backup software 278</p> <p>Drive-specific backup software 279</p> <p>Windows Backup 279</p> <p>Smartphone/tablet backup 280</p> <p>Manual file or folder copying backups 280</p> <p>Automated task file or folder copying backups 280</p> <p>Creating a Boot Disk 281</p> <p>Knowing Where to Back Up 281</p> <p>Local storage 282</p> <p>Offsite storage 282</p> <p>Cloud 282</p> <p>Network storage 283</p> <p>Mixing locations 284</p> <p>Knowing Where Not to Store Backups 284</p> <p>Encrypting Backups 285</p> <p>Testing Backups 286</p> <p>Disposing of Backups 286</p> <p><b>Chapter 15: Resetting Your Device</b><b> 289</b></p> <p>Exploring Two Types of Resets 289</p> <p>Soft resets 290</p> <p>Hard resets 292</p> <p>Rebuilding Your Device after a Hard Reset 298</p> <p><b>Chapter 16: Restoring from Backups</b><b> 299</b></p> <p>You Will Need to Restore 299</p> <p>Wait! Do Not Restore Yet! 300</p> <p>Restoring Data to Apps 300</p> <p>Restoring from Full Backups of Systems 301</p> <p>Restoring to the computing device that was originally backed up 301</p> <p>Restoring to a different device than the one that was originally backed up 302</p> <p>Original system images 303</p> <p>Later system images 303</p> <p>Installing security software 303</p> <p>Original installation media 304</p> <p>Downloaded software 304</p> <p>Restoring from full backups of data 305</p> <p>Restoring from Incremental Backups 306</p> <p>Incremental backups of data 306</p> <p>Incremental backups of systems 306</p> <p>Differential backups 307</p> <p>Continuous backups 308</p> <p>Partial backups 308</p> <p>Folder backups 309</p> <p>Drive backups 309</p> <p>Virtual-drive backups 310</p> <p>Dealing with Deletions 311</p> <p>Excluding Files and Folders 311</p> <p>Understanding Archives 312</p> <p>Multiple files stored within one file 312</p> <p>Old live data 313</p> <p>Old versions of files, folders, or backups 314</p> <p>Restoring Using Backup Tools 314</p> <p>Restoring from a Windows backup 315</p> <p>Restoring to a system restore point 315</p> <p>Restoring from a smartphone/tablet backup 315</p> <p>Restoring from manual file or folder copying backups 316</p> <p>Utilizing third-party backups of data hosted at third parties 317</p> <p>Returning Backups to Their Proper Locations 317</p> <p>Network storage 317</p> <p>Restoring from a combination of locations 318</p> <p>Restoring to Non-Original Locations 318</p> <p>Never Leave Your Backups Connected 318</p> <p>Restoring from Encrypted Backups 319</p> <p>Testing Backups 319</p> <p>Restoring Cryptocurrency 319</p> <p>Booting from a Boot Disk 320</p> <p><b>Part 7: Looking toward the Future</b><b> 321</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 17: Pursuing a Cybersecurity Career</b><b> 323</b></p> <p>Professional Roles in Cybersecurity 324</p> <p>Security engineer 324</p> <p>Security manager 324</p> <p>Security director 324</p> <p>Chief information security officer (CISO) 324</p> <p>Security analyst 325</p> <p>Security architect 325</p> <p>Security administrator 325</p> <p>Security auditor 325</p> <p>Cryptographer 325</p> <p>Vulnerability assessment analyst 326</p> <p>Ethical hacker 326</p> <p>Security researcher 326</p> <p>Offensive hacker 326</p> <p>Software security engineer 327</p> <p>Software source code security auditor 327</p> <p>Security consultant 327</p> <p>Security expert witness 327</p> <p>Security specialist 327</p> <p>Incident response team member 328</p> <p>Forensic analyst 328</p> <p>Cybersecurity regulations expert 328</p> <p>Privacy regulations expert 328</p> <p>Exploring Career Paths 328</p> <p>Career path: Senior security architect 329</p> <p>Career path: CISO 329</p> <p>Starting Out in Information Security 331</p> <p>Exploring Popular Certifications 332</p> <p>CISSP 332</p> <p>CISM 333</p> <p>CEH 333</p> <p>Security+ 334</p> <p>GSEC 334</p> <p>Verifiability 335</p> <p>Ethics 335</p> <p>Overcoming a Criminal Record 335</p> <p>Overcoming Bad Credit 336</p> <p>Looking at Other Professions with a Cybersecurity Focus 336</p> <p><b>Chapter 18: Emerging Technologies Bring New Threats</b><b> 337</b></p> <p>Relying on the Internet of Things 338</p> <p>Critical infrastructure risks 339</p> <p>Computers on wheels: modern cars 340</p> <p>Using Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain 340</p> <p>Cloud-Based Applications and Data 342</p> <p>Optimizing Artificial Intelligence 343</p> <p>Increased need for cybersecurity 344</p> <p>Use as a cybersecurity tool 345</p> <p>Use as a hacking tool 345</p> <p>Where Was This Laptop Really Made? Supply Chain Risks 346</p> <p>Nothing Is Trustworthy: Zero Trust 347</p> <p>Genius Computers Are Coming: Quantum Supremacy 347</p> <p>Experiencing Virtual Reality 348</p> <p>Transforming Experiences with Augmented Reality 350</p> <p><b>Part 8: The Part of Tens</b><b> 351</b></p> <p><b>Chapter 19: Ten Ways to Improve Your Cybersecurity without Spending a Fortune</b><b> 353</b></p> <p>Understand That You Are a Target 353</p> <p>Use Security Software 354</p> <p>Encrypt Sensitive Information 354</p> <p>Back Up Often 356</p> <p>Do Not Share Login Credentials 356</p> <p>Use Proper Authentication 357</p> <p>Use Social Media Wisely 357</p> <p>Segregate Internet Access 357</p> <p>Use Public Wi-Fi Safely (Or Better Yet, Don&rsquo;t Use It!) 358</p> <p>Hire a Pro 358</p> <p><b>Chapter 20: Ten (or So) Lessons from Major Cybersecurity Breaches</b><b> 359</b></p> <p>Marriott 359</p> <p>Target 361</p> <p>Sony Pictures 362</p> <p>U.S Office of Personnel Management 363</p> <p>Anthem 363</p> <p>Colonial Pipeline and JBS SA 364</p> <p>Colonial Pipeline 364</p> <p>JBS 365</p> <p><b>Chapter 21: Ten Ways to Safely Use Public Wi-Fi</b><b> 367</b></p> <p>Use Your Cellphone as a Mobile Hotspot 368</p> <p>Turn Off Wi-Fi Connectivity When You&rsquo;re Not Using Wi-Fi 368</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t Perform Sensitive Tasks over Public Wi-Fi 369</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t Reset Passwords When Using Public Wi-Fi 369</p> <p>Use a VPN Service 369</p> <p>Use Tor 369</p> <p>Use Encryption 370</p> <p>Turn Off Sharing 370</p> <p>Have Information Security Software on Any Devices Connected to Public Wi-Fi Networks 370</p> <p>Understand the Difference between True Public Wi-Fi and Shared Wi-Fi 370</p> <p>Index 371</p>
<p><b>Joseph Steinberg</b> is a master of cybersecurity. He is one of very few people to hold the suite of security certifications including: CISSP<sup>®</sup>, ISSAP<sup>®</sup>, ISSMP<sup>®</sup>, and CSSLP<sup>®</sup>. Joseph has written several books on cybersecurity, including the previous edition of <i>Cybersecurity For Dummies</i>. He is currently a consultant on information security, and serves as an expert witness in related matters.</p>
<p><b>Cybersecurity made easy</b></p> <p>These days, cybersecurity is for everyone. <i>Cybersecurity For Dummies</i> helps you protect your personal information and lock down your business data. In this updated edition, you get the latest facts about what happens to the stuff you put online. Work from home securely and avoid misinformation. Make sure your photos, passwords, and other important stuff are safe from hackers. And if your info should happen to fall into the wrong hands? We explain how to identify the problem and what to do about it. Let Dummies be your digital defender. <p><b>Inside… <ul><li>Safeguard against cyberattacks</li> <li>Determine your cybersecurity strengths and weaknesses</li> <li>Make your personal and business data more secure </li> <li>Recover from a security breach</li> <li>Learn about careers in the growing field of cybersecurity</li></b></ul>

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