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Confidence and Legitimacy in Health Information and Communication


Confidence and Legitimacy in Health Information and Communication


1. Aufl.

von: Ceiline Paganelli

111,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-Iste
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 08.10.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9781119549727
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 298

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Beschreibungen

The question of trust is crucial in the field of health. First, because health is indicative of particularly strong issues at the societal, regulatory, institutional or individual levels; secondly, because the boundaries between specialized information validated by legitimate instances and uncommitted information have become permeable; finally, because it appears to be central within relations between actors in the field. In this book, we propose to address the trust in terms of the information and communication phenomena that are at work in the health sector, and to look at the process of building the legitimacy of information in the health sector. health.
Preface xiCéline Paganelli Introduction xiiiCéline Paganelli Chapter 1. Information Sources on Childhood Immunization 1Mylène Costes 1.1. Introduction 1 1.2. Methodology 3 1.3. Vaccination: a proven trust 4 1.3.1. Loss of trust in the vaccination act 4 1.3.2. The vaccination obligation 5 1.4. Health and legitimacy information retrieval: an ambivalent stance 6 1.4.1. Health information research practices 6 1.4.2. Criteria for the legitimacy of online medical information 8 1.5. Parents’ knowledge of vaccination 10 1.5.1. Lack of knowledge and limited use of the available information 10 1.5.2. Few parents seek information on vaccination 12 1.6. The opinion of the health professional: a forced trust? 13 1.6.1. A discourse that can change the perception of the vaccination act 13 1.6.2. Maintained trust for health professionals 14 1.7. Conclusion 15 1.8. References 17 Chapter 2. Web 2.0, Parenting and Informational Habitus 21Maryline Vivion 2.1. Vaccine hesitancy: a manifestation of parental approach 21 2.2. Methodology 24 2.3. Results 26 2.3.1. Diversified information practices 26 2.3.2. The Internet and the importance of choice 28 2.3.3. Mechanisms for determining information credibility 30 2.4. Information reflexivity 33 2.5. Conclusion 35 2.6. References 37 Chapter 3. Trust, Information Sources and the Impact on Decision-Making: The Example of Vaccination 43Ève Dubé and Dominique Gagnon 3.1. Introduction 43 3.2. Vaccination: a complex decision influenced by trust 44 3.3. Vaccine hesitancy and trust toward information 46 3.3.1. Quebec parents’ trust in the information provided about their children’s vaccination 47 3.4. Media, information and vaccine hesitancy 49 3.4.1. Media and media controversies surrounding vaccination 49 3.4.2. Media controversy surrounding human papillomavirus vaccination in Quebec 49 3.4.3. Vaccination information research: impact on vaccine decision-making 51 3.5. Challenges and issues of public health communication to increase vaccine coverage 52 3.6. Conclusion 54 3.7. References 55 Chapter 4. Info-Communication Practices of Autistic Children’s Parents on the Internet: Trust Issues and Legitimacy 67Clément Dussarps and Denis Dussarps 4.1. Introduction 67 4.2. Search for health information on the Internet: questioning the medical authority? 68 4.3. Trust and legitimacy: at the heart of the patient’s “actorization” 70 4.4. The trust crisis concerning autism 71 4.5. Methodological elements 73 4.6. Sample presentation and statistical limits 74 4.7. The trust crisis in autism: empirical evidence 75 4.8. Habits in information retrieval on autism 79 4.9. Parents’ motivations to go on the Internet and compensation research because of a lack of medical info-communication 80 4.10. Conclusion: overview and perspectives 83 4.11. References 84 Chapter 5. Trust and Information Behavior of French Air Force Flight Nurses 87Anna Lezon Rivière and Madjid Ihadjadene 5.1. Introduction 87 5.2. Information behavior and situation awareness 88 5.3. Group of actors and study methodology 92 5.4. Analysis of the empirical study’s results 93 5.4.1. Building trusting relationships 93 5.4.2. Trust and roles/structure as information sources 95 5.4.3. Trust and communication 96 5.4.4. Trust and skills/knowledge/experience 98 5.4.5. Trust and control 100 5.5. Discussion and conclusion 100 5.6. References 103 Chapter 6. Online Info-Communication Practices in the Face of a Crisis of Trust in Breast Cancer Prevention 107Pierre Mignot and Dorsaf Omrane 6.1. Introduction 107 6.2. Breast cancer prevention: a strategic uncertainty? 109 6.2.1. Public health communication: toward a culture of prevention? 110 6.2.2. Breast cancer preventions in question: measures and actors 112 6.3. Online info-communication practices of the population concerned by breast cancer prevention 117 6.3.1. Methodological choices for the analysis of an online exchange area 118 6.3.2. Two trust measures: between judgment and promises 120 6.4. Discussion and conclusion 128 6.5. References 129 Chapter 7. Trust between Constraints and Limitations of Information Behaviors Among Public Health Policy Actors: The Case of Music Therapy 135Nathalie Verdier 7.1. Introduction 135 7.2. Context of emergence of the question of trust: the case of music therapy 136 7.3. Research field 138 7.4. Devices to observe 140 7.5. Methodology 141 7.6. Trust apprehended through the digital document 142 7.7. Trust apprehended via institutional sites 147 7.8. Trust apprehended through digital devices 148 7.9. Conclusion 152 7.10. Annex 153 7.10.1. Parliamentary documents 153 7.10.2. Documents distributed by the HAS 153 7.10.3. Attribution documents created using screenshots from institutional website pages via the following links 154 7.11. References154 Chapter 8. Hospital Trust and Legitimacy: Internal Medicine in the French Health Care System 159Paméla Baillette and Michel Mannarini 8.1. Introduction 159 8.2. The interface-actor as a transversal integrator 160 8.2.1. Presentation of the interface-actor 160 8.2.2. Interface-actor missions 162 8.3. Internal medicine at the interface of hospital services 165 8.3.1. Internal medicine and the role of the internist 165 8.3.2. Readability and notoriety of internal medicine 168 8.3.3. Evolution of internal medicine 171 8.4. Conclusion 172 8.5. References 173 Chapter 9. From Health Actors’ Information-Communication Issues in the Workplace to Obstacles when Establishing a Relationship of Trust 177Aurélia Dumas 9.1. Introduction 177 9.2. Building the company’s legitimacy in occupational health safety 179 9.2.1. The employer’s obligations 179 9.2.2. Biopolitical perspective and company’s legitimacy 180 9.2.3. Health actors: health information and communication producers within the company 182 9.3. Info-communication issues of health actors within the company 183 9.3.1. Between distance and alignment regarding institutional communication 183 9.3.2. The lack of visibility and burden of health actors 185 9.4. The company and its communication policies: obstacles to establishing a relationship of trust 186 9.4.1. Primacy of control logic and employee concealment strategies 186 9.4.2. The difficulty of talking for employees 187 9.5. Conclusion 188 9.6. References 190 Chapter 10. Connected Health: Between Common Aspirations and Specific Interests 195Adrian Staii 10.1. Introduction: connected health, a notion in search of a referent 195 10.2. Multiple paths of a historical disempowerment of health 198 10.3. New economic configurations of connected health 202 10.4. Conclusion: trust, an ever-new challenge 214 10.5. References 218 Chapter 11. Expressions of Trust in the Home-Based Care Relationship and Areas of Legitimacy in the Context of Digital Media 223Géraldine Goulinet-Fité and Didier Paquelin 11.1. Introduction 223 11.2. Care: a relationship between actors 224 11.2.1. Structure of treatment: logics forged concerning epistemological foundations between cure and care 225 11.2.2. Interactional dimensions and functions of the care relationship 228 11.3. Dynamic of building trust in the home-based care relationship 231 11.3.1. Trust in the doctor-patient relationship: a notion rooted in privacy 234 11.3.2. Trust in the caregiver-patient relationship: a pattern shaped by esteem 234 11.3.3. Trust in the helping-patient relationship: a domestic commitment of proximity 235 11.4. Digital mediatization of the relationship based on the care device 238 11.4.1. Singularity of media coverage of the relationship with ICT 239 11.4.2. Singularity of media coverage of care with ICT 240 11.4.3. Trust climate in the context of digital media 241 11.5. Forecast and conclusion 243 11.6. References 245 Chapter 12. The Electronic Medical Record: Standardization Issues and Personalization of Information for Health Professionals 251David Morquin and Roxana Ologeanu-Taddei 12.1. Introduction to EMRs 251 12.2. Literature review 253 12.3. Exploratory empirical study 256 12.3.1. Study context 256 12.3.2. Methodology 258 12.4. Discussion and conclusion 265 12.5. References 267 Postface 273Viviane Couzinet List of Authors 275 Index 277

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