Details

Applied Water Science, Volume 2


Applied Water Science, Volume 2

Remediation Technologies
1. Aufl.

von: Inamuddin, Mohd Imran Ahamed, Rajender Boddula, Tauseef Ahmad Rangreez

173,99 €

Verlag: Wiley
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 26.08.2021
ISBN/EAN: 9781119725244
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 688

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

<B>APPLIED WATER SCIENCE VOLUME 2</B> <p>The second volume in a new two-volume set on applied water science, this book provides understanding, occurrence, identification, toxic effects and control of water pollutants in an aquatic environment using green chemistry protocols. The high rate of industrialization around the world has led to an increase in the rate of anthropogenic activities which involve the release of different types of contaminants into the aquatic environment. This generates high environmental risks, which could affect health and socio-economic activities if not treated properly. There is no doubt that the rapid progress in improving water quality and management has been motivated by the latest developments in green chemistry. Over the past decade, sources of water pollutants and the conventional methods used for the treatment of industrial wastewater treatment have flourished. <p>Water quality and its adequate availability have been a matter of concern worldwide particularly in developing countries. According to a World Health Organization (WHO) report, more than 80% of diseases are due to the consumption of contaminated water. Heavy metals are highly toxic and are a potential threat to water, soil, and air. Their consumption in higher concentrations gives hazardous outcomes. Water quality is usually measured in terms of chemical, physical, biological, and radiological standards. The discharge of effluent by industries contains heavy metals, hazardous chemicals, and a high amount of organic and inorganic impurities that can contaminate the water environment, and hence, human health. Therefore, it is our primary responsibility to maintain the water quality in our respective countries. <p>This book provides understanding, occurrence, identification, toxic effects and control of water pollutants in an aquatic environment using green chemistry protocols. It focuses on water remediation properties and processes including industry-scale water remediation technologies. This book covers recent literature on remediation technologies in preventing water contamination and its treatment. Chapters in this book discuss remediation of emerging pollutants using nanomaterials, polymers, advanced oxidation processes, membranes, and microalgae bioremediation, etc. It also includes photochemical, electrochemical, piezoacoustic, and ultrasound techniques. It is a unique reference guide for graduate students, faculties, researchers and industrialists working in the area of water science, environmental science, analytical chemistry, and chemical engineering. <p>This outstanding new volume: <ul><li>Provides an in-depth overview of remediation technologies in water science</li> <li>Is written by leading experts in the field</li> <li>Contains excellent, well-drafted chapters for beginners, graduate students, veteran engineers, and other experts alike</li> <li>Discusses current challenges and future perspectives in the field</li></ul> <p><b>Audience: </b>This book is an invaluable guide to engineers, students, professors, scientists and R&D industrial specialists working in the fields of environmental science, geoscience, water science, physics and chemistry.
<p>Preface xvii</p> <p><b>1 Insights of the Removal of Antibiotics From Water and Wastewater: A Review on Physical, Chemical, and Biological Techniques 1<br /></b><i>Ali Khadir, Amin M. Ramezanali, Shabnam Taghipour and Khadijeh Jafari</i></p> <p>1.1 Introduction 2</p> <p>1.2 Antibiotic Removal Methods 4</p> <p>1.2.1 Aerobic Biological Treatment 4</p> <p>1.2.2 Anaerobic Biological Treatment 8</p> <p>1.2.3 Adsorption Processes 12</p> <p>1.2.3.1 Activated Carbon and its Composites 12</p> <p>1.2.3.2 Magnetic Nanomaterials/Adsorbents 15</p> <p>1.2.4 Advanced Oxidation Processes 18</p> <p>1.2.4.1 Fenton Type Processes 19</p> <p>1.2.4.2 Peroxone 24</p> <p>1.2.4.3 Photocatalytic Degradation 27</p> <p>1.2.5 Electrocoagulation 30</p> <p>1.3 Conclusion 32</p> <p>References 33</p> <p><b>2 Adsorption on Alternative Low-Cost Materials-Derived Adsorbents in Water Treatment 49<br /></b><i>Wojciech Stawiński and Katarzyna Wal</i></p> <p>2.1 Introduction 50</p> <p>2.2 Water Treatment 50</p> <p>2.3 Adsorption 51</p> <p>2.4 Application of Low-Cost Waste-Based Adsorbents in Water Treatment 51</p> <p>2.4.1 Bark 52</p> <p>2.4.1.1 Eucalyptus 52</p> <p>2.4.1.2 Pine 52</p> <p>2.4.1.3 Other 55</p> <p>2.4.2 Coffee 55</p> <p>2.4.3 Feather 58</p> <p>2.4.4 Husks or Hulls 60</p> <p>2.4.4.1 Peanut 62</p> <p>2.4.4.2 Rice 62</p> <p>2.4.4.3 Other 63</p> <p>2.4.5 Leaves 63</p> <p>2.4.6 Peels 65</p> <p>2.4.6.1 Banana 65</p> <p>2.4.6.2 Citruses 67</p> <p>2.4.6.3 Garlic 69</p> <p>2.4.6.4 Litchi 70</p> <p>2.4.6.5 Other 71</p> <p>2.4.7 Rinds 71</p> <p>2.4.8 Seeds 75</p> <p>2.4.9 Stones or Pits 78</p> <p>2.4.9.1 Date 78</p> <p>2.4.9.2 Olive 81</p> <p>2.4.9.3 Other 81</p> <p>2.4.10 Tea 82</p> <p>2.5 Disadvantages 84</p> <p>2.6 Conclusions 86</p> <p>References 86</p> <p><b>3 Mathematical Modeling of Reactor for Water Remediation 107<br /></b><i>Hamidreza Bagheri, Ali Mohebbi, Maryam Mirzaie and Vahab Ghalandari</i></p> <p>3.1 Introduction 108</p> <p>3.2 Water Remediation 109</p> <p>3.2.1 Water Remediation Techniques 110</p> <p>3.3 Reactor Modeling 112</p> <p>3.3.1 Modeling of Multi-Phase Flows 118</p> <p>3.3.2 Governing Equations for Multiphase Models 124</p> <p>3.3.2.1 Photocatalytic Reactors 128</p> <p>3.3.2.2 Bubble Column 132</p> <p>3.3.2.3 Fluidized Bed Reactors 137</p> <p>3.3.2.4 Adsorption Column 142</p> <p>3.3.2.5 Air Sparging Technology 143</p> <p>3.3.2.6 Electrochemical Reactors 146</p> <p>3.4 Conclusions 154</p> <p>References 156</p> <p><b>4 Environmental Remediation Using Integrated MicrobialElectrochemical Wetlands: iMETLands 171<br /></b><i>A. Biswas and S. Chakraborty</i></p> <p>4.1 Introduction 172</p> <p>4.2 Constructed Wetland–Microbial Fuel Cell (CW–MFC) System 174</p> <p>4.2.1 Role of Redox Gradient 175</p> <p>4.2.2 Role of Microorganisms 176</p> <p>4.2.3 Role of WW Strength 176</p> <p>4.2.4 Role of Wetland Vegetation 176</p> <p>4.3 iMETLand State of the Art 177</p> <p>4.3.1 iMETLand as a Potential Treatment Unit for Industrial Wastewater 184</p> <p>4.4 Conclusion, Challenges and Future Directions 184</p> <p>References 185</p> <p><b>5 Forward Osmosis Membrane Technology for the Petroleum Industry Wastewater Treatment 191<br /></b><i>Shahryar Jafarinejad and Nader Vahdat</i></p> <p>5.1 Introduction 191</p> <p>5.2 Forward Osmosis Membrane Process 192</p> <p>5.2.1 Main Factors in FO Technology 193</p> <p>5.3 FO Technology for the Petroleum Industry Wastewater Treatment 194</p> <p>5.3.1 Literature Review of FO Technology for the Petroleum Industry Wastewater Treatment 194</p> <p>5.3.2 Recent Advances in FO Membranes 205</p> <p>5.4 Challenges Ahead and Future Perspectives 206</p> <p>5.5 Conclusions 207</p> <p>References 208</p> <p><b>6 UV/Periodate Advanced Oxidation Process: Fundamentals and Applications 215<br /></b><i>Slimane Merouani and Oualid Hamdaoui</i></p> <p>6.1 Introduction 216</p> <p>6.2 Periodate Speciation in Aqueous Solution 217</p> <p>6.3 Generation of Reactive Species Upon UV-Photolysis of Periodate 218</p> <p>6.4 Application of UV/IO<sup>-</sup><sub>4</sub> for Organics Degradation 223</p> <p>6.5 Scavenging of the Reactive Species Under Laboratory Conditions 234</p> <p>6.6 Factors Influencing the Degradation Process 236</p> <p>6.6.1 Initial Periodate Concentration 236</p> <p>6.6.2 Irradiation Intensity 237</p> <p>6.6.3 Initial Pollutant Concentration 237</p> <p>6.6.4 pH 238</p> <p>6.6.5 Temperature 240</p> <p>6.7 Advantages of UV/Periodate Process 240</p> <p>6.8 Conclusion 241</p> <p>Acknowledgements 242</p> <p>References 242</p> <p><b>7 Trends in Landfill Leachate Treatment Through Biological Biotechnology 249<br /></b><i>Ali Khadir, Arman N. Ardestani, Mika Sillanpää and Shreya Mahajan</i></p> <p>7.1 Introduction 250</p> <p>7.2 Landfill Leachate Characteristics 252</p> <p>7.3 Wastewater Treatment Techniques 255</p> <p>7.4 Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Processes 258</p> <p>7.5 Different Biological Systems for Landfill Leachate Treatment 260</p> <p>7.5.1 Aerobic Membrane Bioreactor 260</p> <p>7.5.2 Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors 263</p> <p>7.5.3 Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor 266</p> <p>7.5.4 Sequencing Batch Reactor 267</p> <p>7.5.5 Aerobic/Anaerobic/Facultative Lagoons 271</p> <p>7.5.6 Trickling Filter 273</p> <p>7.5.7 Rotating Biological Contactor 274</p> <p>7.6 Conclusion 276</p> <p>References 277</p> <p><b>8 Metal–Organic Framework Nanoparticle Technology for Water Remediation: Road to a Sustainable Ecosystem 289<br /></b><i>Rashmirekha Tripathy, Tejaswini Sahoo, Jagannath Panda, Madhuri Hembram, Saraswati Soren, C.K. Rath, Sunil Kumar Sahoo and Rojalin Sahu</i></p> <p>8.1 Introduction to MOF Nanoparticles 290</p> <p>8.2 MOFs for Decontamination of Water 291</p> <p>8.2.1 Inorganic Contaminant 292</p> <p>8.2.2 Nuclear Contaminants 293</p> <p>8.2.3 Organic Contaminants 293</p> <p>8.2.4 Sources of Heavy Metals in Water 294</p> <p>8.3 Impact of MOFs for Remediation of Water 295</p> <p>8.3.1 Applications of MOF Nanoparticles for Water Remediation 296</p> <p>8.3.2 Adsorption By MOF Nanoparticles 298</p> <p>8.3.3 Conventional Nanoparticles Used in Water Remediation 299</p> <p>8.4 Removal of Organic Contaminant 303</p> <p>8.4.1 Removal of Heavy Metal Ions 303</p> <p>8.4.2 MOF Powder-Based Membrane for Organic Contaminants Removal 306</p> <p>8.4.3 Photocatalytic Remediation of Water Using MOF Nanoparticles 307</p> <p>8.5 MOF Nanoparticle Magnetic Iron-Based Technology for Water Remediation 307</p> <p>8.5.1 Iron as a Remediation Tool 308</p> <p>8.5.2 Research Needs and Limitations 310</p> <p>8.6 Conclusions 311</p> <p>References 311</p> <p><b>9 Metal–Organic Frameworks for Heavy Metal Removal 321<br /></b><i>Anam Asghar, Mustapha Mohammed Bello and Abdul Aziz Abdul Raman</i></p> <p>9.1 Introduction 322</p> <p>9.2 Heavy Metals in Environment 323</p> <p>9.3 Heavy Metals Removal Technologies 325</p> <p>9.3.1 Adsorption of Heavy Metals 326</p> <p>9.3.2 Metal–Organic Frameworks as Adsorbent for Heavy Metals Removal 327</p> <p>9.4 Applications of Metal–Organic Framework in Heavy Metals Removal 330</p> <p>9.4.1 Mercury 330</p> <p>9.4.2 Copper 336</p> <p>9.4.3 Chromium 338</p> <p>9.4.4 Lead 340</p> <p>9.4.5 Arsenic 341</p> <p>9.4.6 Cadmium 344</p> <p>9.5 Conclusion 344</p> <p>References 345</p> <p><b>10 Microalgae-Based Bioremediation 357<br /></b><i>Rosangela R. Dias, Mariany C. Deprá, Leila Q. Zepka and Eduardo Jacob-Lopes</i></p> <p>10.1 Introduction to Microalgae-Based Bioremediation 357</p> <p>10.2 Microalgae Bioremediation Mechanisms 358</p> <p>10.3 Inorganic Pollutants Bioremediation 360</p> <p>10.3.1 Heavy Metals 360</p> <p>10.3.2 Greenhouse Gases 362</p> <p>10.4 Organic Pollutants Bioremediation 363</p> <p>10.4.1 Agrochemicals 363</p> <p>10.4.2 Phthalate Esters (PAEs) 364</p> <p>10.4.3 Tributyltin 365</p> <p>10.4.4 Petroleum Hydrocarbons and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) 366</p> <p>10.4.5 Trinitrotoluene 367</p> <p>10.5 Emerging Pollutants Removal 368</p> <p>10.5.1 Pharmaceutics 368</p> <p>10.5.2 Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Compounds (PFAS) 370</p> <p>10.6 Bioremediation Associated with the Bioproducts Production 370</p> <p>10.7 Integrated Technology for Microalgae-Based Bioremediation 372</p> <p>10.8 Conclusion 372</p> <p>References 373</p> <p><b>11 Photocatalytic Water Disinfection 381<br /></b><i>Prachi Upadhyay and Sankar Chakma</i></p> <p>11.1 Introduction 381</p> <p>11.2 Techniques for Water Disinfection 383</p> <p>11.2.1 Ozone and Ozone-Based Water Disinfection 384</p> <p>11.2.2 H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>/UV-Based Water Disinfection 386</p> <p>11.2.3 Fenton-Based Water Disinfection 387</p> <p>11.2.4 Sonolysis-Based Water Disinfection 388</p> <p>11.2.5 Photocatalysis-Based Water Disinfection 390</p> <p>11.2.6 Ultrasound/Ozone-Based Water Disinfection 394</p> <p>11.2.7 Ultrasound/H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>/UV-Based Water Disinfection 395</p> <p>11.2.8 Ultrasound/Fenton/H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>-Based Water Disinfection 395</p> <p>11.2.9 Ultrasound/Photocatalysis-Based Water Disinfection 396</p> <p>11.3 Conclusion 398</p> <p>References 398</p> <p><b>12 Phytoremediation and the Way Forward: Challenges and Opportunities 405<br /></b><i>Shinomol George K. and Bhanu Revathi K.</i></p> <p>12.1 Introduction 405</p> <p>12.1.1 Bioremediation and Biosorption 406</p> <p>12.1.2 Recent Developments in Bioremediation 408</p> <p>12.2 Biosorbant for Phytoremediation 410</p> <p>12.2.1 Algae and Weeds as Biosorbants 410</p> <p>12.2.1.1 Removal of Chromium 411</p> <p>12.2.1.2 Removal of Cadmium 412</p> <p>12.2.1.3 Removal of Zinc 412</p> <p>12.2.1.4 Removal of Copper 413</p> <p>12.2.1.5 Removal of Strontium, Uranium and Lead 413</p> <p>12.2.2 Agricultural Biomass as Biosorbents 414</p> <p>12.2.2.1 Removal of Nickel and Chromium 415</p> <p>12.2.2.2 Removal of Cadmium and Lead 416</p> <p>12.2.2.3 Removal of Copper and Zinc 418</p> <p>12.2.2.4 Removal of Other Metals: Fe (II), Mn(II), Va and Mo 419</p> <p>12.2.2.5 Removal of Nickel and Cobalt 419</p> <p>12.2.2.6 Removal of Uranium 420</p> <p>12.2.2.7 Other Biomaterials 421</p> <p>12.2.3 Biochar as Biosorbent 422</p> <p>12.3 Soil Amendments for Enhancement of Bioremediation 423</p> <p>12.4 Challenges & Future Prespectives 424</p> <p>12.4.1 Future Perspectives 424</p> <p>12.5 Conclusion 425</p> <p>References 426</p> <p><b>13 Sonochemistry for Water Remediation: Toward an Up-Scaled Continuous Technology 437<br /></b><i>Kaouther Kerboua and Oualid Hamdaoui</i></p> <p>13.1 Introduction 438</p> <p>13.2 Water Remediation Technologies: The Place of Ultrasound and Sonochemistry 439</p> <p>13.3 Continuous-Flow Sonochemistry: State-of-the-Art 456</p> <p>13.4 Perspectives for an Up-Scaled Continuous Sonochemical Technology for Water Remediation 460</p> <p>References 461</p> <p><b>14 Advanced Oxidation Technologies for the Treatment of Wastewater 469<br /></b><i>Pallavi Jain, Sapna Raghav and Dinesh Kumar</i></p> <p>14.1 Introduction 469</p> <p>14.2 Principle Involved 471</p> <p>14.3 Advanced Oxidation Process 472</p> <p>14.3.1 Fenton’s Reagent 472</p> <p>14.3.2 Peroxonation 474</p> <p>14.3.3 Sonolysis 475</p> <p>14.3.4 Ozonation 476</p> <p>14.3.5 Ultraviolet Radiation-Based AOP 476</p> <p>14.3.6 Photo-Fenton Process 477</p> <p>14.3.7 Heterogeneous Photocatalysts 478</p> <p>14.4 Perspectives and Recommendations 478</p> <p>14.5 Conclusions 479</p> <p>Acknowledgment 480</p> <p>References 480</p> <p><b>15 Application of Copper Oxide-Based Catalysts in Advanced Oxidation Processes 485<br /></b><i>D. Mohammady Maklavany, Z. Rouzitalab, S. Jafarinejad, Y. Mohammadpourderakhshi and A. Rashidi</i></p> <p>15.1 Introduction 485</p> <p>15.2 An Overview of Catalytic AOPs 487</p> <p>15.2.1 Fenton-Based Processes 487</p> <p>15.2.2 Catalytic Ozonation 487</p> <p>15.2.3 Heterogeneous Photocatalysis 489</p> <p>15.2.4 Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) 490</p> <p>15.2.5 Catalytic Supercritical Water Oxidation (CSCWO) 491</p> <p>15.2.6 Persulfate Advanced Oxidation Processes (PS-AOPs) 491</p> <p>15.3 Recent Advances in Copper Oxide-Based Catalysts 492</p> <p>15.3.1 Morphologically Transformed Copper Oxide 493</p> <p>15.3.2 Supported Copper Oxide (CuO<sub>x</sub>/Support) 494</p> <p>15.3.3 Coupled Copper Oxide 496</p> <p>15.3.4 Doped Copper Oxide (X-Doped CuO<sub>x</sub>) 497</p> <p>15.4 Literature Review of Application of Copper Oxide-Based Catalysts for AOPs 499</p> <p>15.4.1 Degradation of Dyes in Wastewater 499</p> <p>15.4.2 Degradation of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater 507</p> <p>15.4.3 Degradation of Phenols in Wastewater 510</p> <p>15.4.4 Degradation of Other Toxic Organic Compounds in Wastewater 514</p> <p>15.5 Conclusion and Future Perspectives 514</p> <p>Acknowlegments 516</p> <p>References 516</p> <p><b>16 Biochar-Based Sorbents for Sequestration of Pharmaceutical Compounds: Considering the Main Parameters in the Adsorption Process 527<br /></b><i>Ali Khadir</i></p> <p>16.1 Introduction 527</p> <p>16.2 Adsorption Fundamentals 529</p> <p>16.3 Effect of Various Parameters on Adsorption of Pharmaceuticals 530</p> <p>16.3.1 Contact Time 530</p> <p>16.3.2 Effect of Initial pH 533</p> <p>16.3.3 Effect of Adsorbent Dosage 537</p> <p>16.3.4 Effect of Temperature and Thermodynamic Parameters 537</p> <p>16.4 Isotherm Models 542</p> <p>16.5 Adsorption Kinetics 548</p> <p>16.6 Conclusion 553</p> <p>References 554</p> <p><b>17 Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater 565<br /></b><i>Shivani Garg, Nelson Pynadathu Rumjit, Paul Thomas and Chin Wei Lai</i></p> <p>Abbreviations 565</p> <p>17.1 Introduction 566</p> <p>17.2 Sources of Agricultural Wastewater 566</p> <p>17.3 Bioremediation Processes for Agricultural Wastewater Treatment 567</p> <p>17.3.1 Biological Treatment Processes 568</p> <p>17.3.1.1 Anaerobic Digestion Treatment 568</p> <p>17.3.1.2 Aerobic Wastewater Treatment 570</p> <p>17.3.2 Bioremediation of Pesticides 573</p> <p>17.3.3 Constructed Wetlands 574</p> <p>17.3.4 Riparian Buffer 575</p> <p>17.4 Conclusion and Future Outlook 575</p> <p>Acknowledgements 576</p> <p>References 576</p> <p><b>18 Remediation of Toxic Contaminants in Water Using Agricultural Waste 581<br /></b><i>Arti Jain and Ritu Payal</i></p> <p>18.1 Introduction 582</p> <p>18.2 Components in Wastewater and Their Negative Impact 583</p> <p>18.3 Techniques for Remediation of Wastewater 583</p> <p>18.4 Agricultural Waste Materials 584</p> <p>18.4.1 Orange Peel 585</p> <p>18.4.2 Pomelo Peel 605</p> <p>18.4.3 Grapefruit Peel (GFP) 605</p> <p>18.4.4 Lemon Peels 605</p> <p>18.4.5 Banana Peel 606</p> <p>18.4.6 Jackfruit Peel 606</p> <p>18.4.7 Cassava Peel 606</p> <p>18.4.8 Pomegranate Peel 607</p> <p>18.4.9 Garlic Peel 607</p> <p>18.4.10 Palm Kernel Shell 607</p> <p>18.4.11 Coconut Shell 607</p> <p>18.4.12 Mangosteen 608</p> <p>18.4.13 Rice Husk 608</p> <p>18.4.14 Corncob 608</p> <p>18.5 Agricultural Waste-Assisted Synthesis of Nanoparticles and Wastewater Remediation Through Nanoparticles 608</p> <p>18.6 Adsorption Models for Adsorbents 609</p> <p>18.6.1 Langmuir Isotherm 609</p> <p>18.6.2 Freundlich Isotherm 610</p> <p>18.7 Conclusions 611</p> <p>References 611</p> <p><b>19 Remediation of Emerging Pollutants by Using Advanced Biological Wastewater Treatments 623<br /></b><i>S. Ghosh and S. Chakraborty</i></p> <p>19.1 Introduction 624</p> <p>19.2 Pharmaceutical Wastewater 626</p> <p>19.2.1 Occurrence and Potential Threats 626</p> <p>19.2.2 Advanced Biological Remediation 626</p> <p>19.3 Pesticide Contaminated Wastewater 628</p> <p>19.3.1 Source of Pollution With Environmental and Health Impacts 628</p> <p>19.3.2 Advanced Biological Treatments 628</p> <p>19.4 Surfactant Pollution 632</p> <p>19.4.1 Source and Impacts of Pollution 632</p> <p>19.4.2 Biological Remediation 632</p> <p>19.5 Microplastic Pollution 634</p> <p>19.5.1 Occurrence and Environmental Threats 634</p> <p>19.5.2 Proposed Remediation Strategies 635</p> <p>19.5.2.1 Microplastic Generation Source Control 635</p> <p>19.5.2.2 Mitigation Policies 636</p> <p>19.6 Endocrine Disrupters in Environment 636</p> <p>19.7 Remedies for Endocrine Disrupters 637</p> <p>19.8 Conclusion 637</p> <p>Acknowledgement 638</p> <p>References 638</p> <p>Index 645</p>
<p><b>Inamuddin, PhD, </b>is an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Chemistry, Zakir Husain College of Engineering and Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. He has extensive research experience in analytical chemistry, materials chemistry, electrochemistry, renewable energy, and environmental science. He has worked on different research projects funded by various government agencies and universities and is the recipient of multiple awards, including the Fast Track Young Scientist Award and the Young Researcher of the Year Award for 2020, from Aligarh Muslim University. He has published almost 200 research articles in various international scientific journals, 18 book chapters, and 120 edited books with multiple well-known publishers.</p> <p><b>Mohd Imran Ahamed, PhD, </B>is a research associate in the Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. He has published several research and review articles in various international scientific journals and has co-edited multiple books. His research work includes ion-exchange chromatography, wastewater treatment, and analysis, bending actuator and electrospinning. <p><b>Rajender Boddula, PhD,</B> is currently working for the Chinese Academy of Sciences President’s International Fellowship Initiative (CAS-PIFI) at the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST, Beijing). His academic honors include multiple fellowships and scholarships, and he has published many scientific articles in international peer-reviewed journals. He also serves as an editorial board member and a referee for several reputed international peer-reviewed journals. He has published edited books with numerous publishers and has authored over 20 book chapters. <p><b>Tauseef Ahmad Rangreez, PhD,</b> is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Technology, Srinagar, India. He completed his PhD in applied chemistry from Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India, and worked as a project fellow under the University Grant Commission, India. He has published several research articles and co-edited books. His research interests include ion-exchange chromatography, development of nanocomposite sensors for heavy metals and biosensors.
<p>The second volume in a new two-volume set on applied water science, this book provides understanding, occurrence, identification, toxic effects and control of water pollutants in an aquatic environment using green chemistry protocols. The high rate of industrialization around the world has led to an increase in the rate of anthropogenic activities which involve the release of different types of contaminants into the aquatic environment. This generates high environmental risks, which could affect health and socio-economic activities if not treated properly. There is no doubt that the rapid progress in improving water quality and management has been motivated by the latest developments in green chemistry. Over the past decade, sources of water pollutants and the conventional methods used for the treatment of industrial wastewater treatment have flourished.</p> <p>Water quality and its adequate availability have been a matter of concern worldwide particularly in developing countries. According to a World Health Organization (WHO) report, more than 80% of diseases are due to the consumption of contaminated water. Heavy metals are highly toxic and are a potential threat to water, soil, and air. Their consumption in higher concentrations gives hazardous outcomes. Water quality is usually measured in terms of chemical, physical, biological, and radiological standards. The discharge of effluent by industries contains heavy metals, hazardous chemicals, and a high amount of organic and inorganic impurities that can contaminate the water environment, and hence, human health. Therefore, it is our primary responsibility to maintain the water quality in our respective countries. <p>This book provides understanding, occurrence, identification, toxic effects and control of water pollutants in an aquatic environment using green chemistry protocols. It focuses on water remediation properties and processes including industry-scale water remediation technologies. This book covers recent literature on remediation technologies in preventing water contamination and its treatment. Chapters in this book discuss remediation of emerging pollutants using nanomaterials, polymers, advanced oxidation processes, membranes, and microalgae bioremediation, etc. It also includes photochemical, electrochemical, piezoacoustic, and ultrasound techniques. It is a unique reference guide for graduate students, faculties, researchers and industrialists working in the area of water science, environmental science, analytical chemistry, and chemical engineering. <p>This outstanding new volume: <ul><li>Provides an in-depth overview of remediation technologies in water science</li> <li>Is written by leading experts in the field</li> <li>Contains excellent, well-drafted chapters for beginners, graduate students, veteran engineers, and other experts alike</li> <li>Discusses current challenges and future perspectives in the field</li></ul> <p><b>Audience: </b>This book is an invaluable guide to engineers, students, professors, scientists and R&D industrial specialists working in the fields of environmental science, geoscience, water science, physics and chemistry.

Diese Produkte könnten Sie auch interessieren:

Finite-Elemente-Methoden im Stahlbau
Finite-Elemente-Methoden im Stahlbau
von: Rolf Kindmann, Matthias Kraus
PDF ebook
52,99 €
Stahlbau
Stahlbau
von: Rolf Kindmann
PDF ebook
52,99 €
Bauphysik - Klima Wärme Feuchte Schall
Bauphysik - Klima Wärme Feuchte Schall
von: Peter Häupl
PDF ebook
34,99 €