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Applied Bioengineering


Applied Bioengineering

Innovations and Future Directions
Advanced Biotechnology 1. Aufl.

von: Toshiomi Yoshida, Sang Yup Lee, Jens Nielsen, Gregory Stephanopoulos

165,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-VCH
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 12.01.2017
ISBN/EAN: 9783527800582
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 656

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Beschreibungen

<b>A comprehensive overview of the topic, highlighting recent developments, ongoing research trends and future directions.</b><br /> Experts from Europe, Asia and the US cover five core areas of imminent importance to the food, feed, pharmaceutical and water treatment industries in terms of sustainable and innovative processing and production. In the field of enzyme engineering, they summarize historic developments and provide an overview of molecular enzyme engineering, while also discussing key principles of microbial process engineering, including chapters on process development and control. Further sections deal with animal and plant cell culture engineering. The final section of the book deals with environmental topics and highlights the application of bioengineering principles in waste treatment and the recovery of valuable resources.<br /> With its cutting-edge visions, extensive discussions and unique perspectives, this is a ready reference for biotechnologists, bioengineers, bioengineers, biotechnological institutes, and environmental chemists.
<p>List of Contributors XIX</p> <p><b>1 Introduction 1</b><br /><i>Toshiomi Yoshida</i></p> <p>1.1 Introduction 1</p> <p>1.2 Enzyme Technology 2</p> <p>1.3 Microbial Process Engineering 2</p> <p>1.4 Plant Cell Culture 5</p> <p>1.5 Animal Cell Culture 5</p> <p>1.6 Environmental Bioengineering 6</p> <p>1.7 Composition of the Volume 7</p> <p>References 7</p> <p><b>Part I Enzyme Technology 11</b></p> <p><b>2 Enzyme Technology: History and Current Trends 13</b><br /><i>Klaus Buchholz and Uwe T. Bornscheuer</i></p> <p>2.1 The Early Period up to 1890 13</p> <p>2.2 The Period from 1890 to 1940 16</p> <p>2.3 A New Biocatalyst Concept – Immobilized Enzymes 19</p> <p>2.4 Expanding Enzyme Application after the 1950s 24</p> <p>2.5 Recombinant Technology –A New Era in Biocatalysis and Enzyme Technology 27</p> <p>2.6 Current Strategies for Biocatalyst Search and Tailor Design 32</p> <p>2.7 Summary and Conclusions 39</p> <p>Acknowledgment 40</p> <p>Abbreviations 40</p> <p>References 40</p> <p><b>3 Molecular Engineering of Enzymes 47</b><br /><i>Maria Elena Ortiz-Soto and Jürgen Seibel</i></p> <p>3.1 Introduction 47</p> <p>3.2 Protein Engineering: An Expanding Toolbox 48</p> <p>3.3 High-Throughput Screening Systems 56</p> <p>3.4 Engineered Enzymes for Improved Stability and Asymmetric Catalysis 58</p> <p>3.5 De Novo Design of Catalysts: Novel Activities within Common Scaffolds 65</p> <p>3.6 Conclusions 69</p> <p>References 69</p> <p><b>4 Biocatalytic Process Development 81</b><br /><i>John M.Woodley</i></p> <p>4.1 A Structured Approach to Biocatalytic Process Development 83</p> <p>4.2 Process Metrics 83</p> <p>4.3 Technologies for Implementation of Biocatalytic Processes 87</p> <p>4.4 Industrial Development Examples 91</p> <p>4.5 Future Outlook 95</p> <p>4.6 Concluding Remarks 96</p> <p>References 96</p> <p><b>5 Development of Enzymatic Reactions in Miniaturized Reactors 99</b><br /><i>Takeshi Honda, Hiroshi Yamaguchi, and Masaya Miyazaki</i></p> <p>5.1 Introduction 99</p> <p>5.2 Fundamental Techniques for Enzyme Immobilization 100</p> <p>5.3 Novel Techniques for Enzyme Immobilization 150</p> <p>5.4 Conclusions and Future Perspectives 155</p> <p>Abbreviations 156</p> <p>References 157</p> <p><b>Part II Microbial Process Engineering 167</b></p> <p><b>6 Bioreactor Development and Process Analytical Technology 169</b><br /><i>Toshiomi Yoshida</i></p> <p>6.1 Introduction 169</p> <p>6.2 Bioreactor Development 170</p> <p>6.3 Monitoring and Process Analytical Technology 196</p> <p>6.4 Conclusion 203</p> <p>Abbreviations 204</p> <p>References 204</p> <p><b>7 Omics-Integrated Approach for Metabolic State Analysis of Microbial Processes 213</b><br /><i>Hiroshi Shimizu, Chikara Furusawa, Takashi Hirasawa, Katsunori Yoshikawa, Yoshihiro Toya, Tomokazu Shirai, and Fumio Matsuda</i></p> <p>7.1 General Introduction 213</p> <p>7.2 Transcriptome Analysis of Microbial Status in Bioprocesses 214</p> <p>7.3 Analysis of Metabolic State Based on Simulation in a Genome-Scale Model 219</p> <p>7.4 13C-Based Metabolic Flux Analysis of Microbial Processes 223</p> <p>7.5 Comprehensive Phenotypic Analysis of Genes Associated with Stress Tolerance 227</p> <p>7.6 Multi-Omics Analysis and Data Integration 230</p> <p>7.7 Future Aspects for Developing the Field 231</p> <p>Acknowledgments 233</p> <p>References 233</p> <p><b>8 Control of Microbial Processes 237</b><br /><i>Kazuyuki Shimizu, Hiroshi Shimizu, and Toshiomi Yoshida</i></p> <p>8.1 Introduction 237</p> <p>8.2 Monitoring 238</p> <p>8.3 Bioprocess Control 242</p> <p>8.4 Recent Trends in Monitoring and Control Technologies 250</p> <p>8.5 Concluding Remarks 253</p> <p>Abbreviations 254</p> <p>References 254</p> <p><b>Part III Plant Cell Culture and Engineering 259</b></p> <p><b>9 Contained Molecular Farming Using Plant Cell and Tissue Cultures 261</b><br /><i>Stefan Schillberg, Nicole Raven, Rainer Fischer, Richard M. Twyman, and Andreas Schiermeyer</i></p> <p>9.1 Molecular Farming –Whole Plants and Cell/Tissue Cultures 261</p> <p>9.2 Plant Cell and Tissue Culture Platforms 263</p> <p>9.3 Comparison ofWhole Plants and In Vitro Culture Platforms 265</p> <p>9.4 Technical Advances on the Road to Commercialization 267</p> <p>9.5 Regulatory and Industry Barriers on the Road to Commercialization 271</p> <p>9.6 Outlook 273</p> <p>Acknowledgments 275</p> <p>References 275</p> <p><b>10 Bioprocess Engineering of Plant Cell Suspension Cultures 283</b><br /><i>Gregory R. Andrews and Susan C. Roberts</i></p> <p>10.1 Introduction 283</p> <p>10.2 Culture Development and Maintenance 286</p> <p>10.3 Choice of Culture System 288</p> <p>10.4 Engineering Considerations 291</p> <p>10.5 Bioprocess Parameters 294</p> <p>10.6 Operational Modes 296</p> <p>10.7 Bioreactors for Plant Cell Suspensions 297</p> <p>10.8 Downstream Processing 303</p> <p>10.9 Yield Improvement Strategies 306</p> <p>10.10 Case Studies 310</p> <p>10.11 Conclusion 315</p> <p>References 316</p> <p><b>11 The Role of Bacteria in Phytoremediation 327</b><br /><i>Zhaoyu Kong and Bernard R. Glick</i></p> <p>11.1 The Problem 327</p> <p>11.2 Defining Phytoremediation and Its Components 329</p> <p>11.3 Role of Bacteria in Phytoremediation 330</p> <p>11.4 Examples of Phytoremediation in Action 342</p> <p>11.5 Summary and Perspectives 343</p> <p>References 344</p> <p><b>Part IV Animal Cell Cultures 355</b></p> <p><b>12 Cell Line Development for Biomanufacturing Processes 357</b><br /><i>Mugdha Gadgil andWei-Shou Hu</i></p> <p>12.1 Introduction 357</p> <p>12.2 Host Cell 359</p> <p>12.3 Vector Components 360</p> <p>12.4 Transfection 365</p> <p>12.5 Integration of Foreign DNA into Host Chromosome 366</p> <p>12.6 Amplification 369</p> <p>12.7 Single-Cell Cloning 370</p> <p>12.8 Selecting the Production Clone 373</p> <p>12.9 Clone Stability 376</p> <p>12.10 Conclusion 376</p> <p>Acknowledgments 377</p> <p>References 377</p> <p><b>13 Medium Design, Culture Management, and the PAT Initiative 383</b><br /><i>Ziomara P. Gerdtzen</i></p> <p>13.1 Historical Perspective on Culture Medium 383</p> <p>13.2 Cell Growth Environment 384</p> <p>13.3 Media Types 386</p> <p>13.4 Medium Components 387</p> <p>13.5 High MolecularWeight and Complex Supplements 400</p> <p>13.6 Medium for Industrial Production 407</p> <p>13.7 Conclusions 411</p> <p>References 412</p> <p>Further Reading/Resources 416</p> <p><b>14 Advanced Bioprocess Engineering: Fed-Batch and Perfusion Processes 417</b><br /><i>Sarika Mehra, Vikas Chandrawanshi, and Kamal Prashad</i></p> <p>14.1 Primary Modes of Bioreactor Operation 417</p> <p>14.2 Fed-Batch Mode of Operation 419</p> <p>14.3 Perfusion Mode of Bioreactor Operation 435</p> <p>14.4 Use of Disposables in Cell Culture Bioprocesses 447</p> <p>14.5 Analytical Methods to Monitor Key Metabolites and Parameters 450</p> <p>14.6 Concluding Remarks 453</p> <p>Nomenclature 455</p> <p>References 456</p> <p>Further Reading/Resources 468</p> <p><b>Part V Environmental Bioengineering 469</b></p> <p><b>15 Treatment of Industrial and Municipal Wastewater: An Overview about Basic and Advanced Concepts 471</b><br /><i>Jyoti K. Kumar, Parag R. Gogate, and Aniruddha B. Pandit</i></p> <p>15.1 Types ofWastewater 471</p> <p>15.2 Biological Treatment 471</p> <p>15.3 Wastewater Regulations 473</p> <p>15.4 Biological Treatment Processes 473</p> <p>15.5 Aerobic Techniques 475</p> <p>15.6 Anaerobic Techniques 488</p> <p>15.7 Aerobic–Anaerobic Processes 495</p> <p>15.8 Modified Biological Processes 496</p> <p>15.9 Overall Conclusions 511</p> <p>List of Acronyms/Abbreviations 512</p> <p>List of Variables and Coefficients 513</p> <p>References 514</p> <p><b>16 Treatment of SolidWaste 521</b><br /><i>Michael Nelles, Gert Morscheck, Astrid Lemke, and Ayman El Naas</i></p> <p>16.1 Biological Treatment of Source Segregated Bio-Waste 522</p> <p>16.2 Mechanical–Biological Treatment of Mixed Municipal Solid Waste 538</p> <p>16.3 Biological Treatment of AgriculturalWaste 542</p> <p>16.4 Conclusion 542</p> <p>References 542</p> <p><b>17 Energy Recovery from Organic Waste 545</b><br /><i>Yutaka Nakashimada and Naomichi Nishio</i></p> <p>17.1 Advantage of Methane Fermentation for Energy Recovery from Organic Matter 545</p> <p>17.2 Basic Knowledge of Methane Fermentation of OrganicWastes 546</p> <p>17.3 Conventional Methane Fermentation Process 549</p> <p>17.4 Advanced Methane Fermentation Processes 551</p> <p>17.5 Hydrogen Production from OrganicWastes 555</p> <p>17.6 Upgrading of Biogas from OrganicWastes Based on Biological Syngas Platform 561</p> <p>17.7 Conclusions 564</p> <p>References 565</p> <p><b>18 Microbial Removal and Recovery of Metals from Wastewater 573</b><br /><i>Michihiko Ike,Mitsuo Yamashita, and Masashi Kuroda</i></p> <p>18.1 Microbial Reactions Available for Metal Removal/Recovery 574</p> <p>18.2 Selenium Recovery by Pseudomonas stutzeri NT-I 583</p> <p>18.3 Future Prospects 587</p> <p>18.4 Conclusions 590</p> <p>References 590</p> <p><b>19 Sustainable Use of Phosphorus Through Bio-Based Recycling 597</b><br /><i>Hisao Ohtake</i></p> <p>19.1 Introduction 597</p> <p>19.2 Microbiological Basis 598</p> <p>19.3 Bio-Based P Recycling 600</p> <p>19.4 Other Options for P Recycling 604</p> <p>19.5 Conclusions 607</p> <p>References 609</p> <p>Index 613</p>
<b>Toshiomi Yoshida</b> is Professor Emeritus of Osaka University (Japan). He received his doctorate degree at the same university in 1968, after studying fermentation technology. From 1972 to 1973, he visited the University of Pennsylvania (USA) for a research stay. In the further course of his career, he became Associate Professor at Osaka University in 1978, Full Professor in 1988 and held several positions within the university until his retirement in 2003. From 1995 to 1999, he was Director of the International Center for Biotechnology. After his retirement, Toshiomi Yoshida was appointed as Director of the Bangkok Liaison Office of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, a position he hold until 2007. From 2007 to 2012, he was Director General of the Research Institute of Environmental, Agriculture and Fisheries of the Osaka Prefectural Government. In between 2009 and 2013, Toshiomi Yoshida served as the first President of the Asian Federation of Biotechnology.
<b>A comprehensive overview of the topic, highlighting ongoing research trends and future directions.</b><br /> Experts from Europe, Asia and the US cover five core areas of imminent importance to the food, feed, pharmaceutical and water treatment industries in terms of sustainable and innovative processing and production. In the field of enzyme engineering, they summarize historic developments and provide an overview of molecular enzyme engineering, while also discussing key principles of microbial process engineering, including chapters on process development and control. Further sections deal with animal and plant cell culture engineering. The final section of the book deals with environmental topics and highlights the application of bioengineering principles in waste treatment and the recovery of valuable resources.<br /> With its cutting-edge visions, extensive discussions and unique perspectives, this is a ready reference for biotechnologists, bioengineers, biotechnological institutes, and environmental chemists.<br /> <br /> <b>Advanced Biotechnology</b><br /> Biotechnology is a broad, interdisciplinary field of science, combining biological sciences and relevant engineering disciplines, that is becoming increasingly important as it benefits the environment and society as a whole. Recent years have seen substantial advances in all areas of biotechnology, resulting in the emergence of brand new fields. To reflect this progress, Sang Yup Lee (KAIST, South Korea), Jens Nielsen (Chalmers University, Sweden), and Gregory Stephanopoulos (MIT, USA) have joined forces as the editors of a new Wiley-VCH book series. Advanced Biotechnology will cover all pertinent aspects of the field and each volume will be prepared by eminent scientists who are experts on the topic in question.

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