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Structural Timber Design to Eurocode 5


Structural Timber Design to Eurocode 5


2. Aufl.

von: Jack Porteous, Abdy Kermani

58,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
Format: EPUB
Veröffentl.: 16.04.2013
ISBN/EAN: 9781118597293
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 640

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

Structural Timber Design to Eurocode 5 provides practising engineers and specialist contractors with comprehensive, detailed information and in-depth guidance on the design of timber structures based on the common rules and rules for buildings in Eurocode 5 – Part 1-1. It will also be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students of civil and structural engineering. It provides a step-by-step approach to the design of all of the commonly used timber elements and connections using solid timber, glued laminated timber or wood based structural products, and incorporates the requirements of the UK National Annex. It covers: strength and stiffness properties of timber and its reconstituted and engineered products key requirements of Eurocode 0, Eurocode 1 and Eurocode 5 – Part 1-1 design of beams and columns of solid timber, glued laminated, composite and thin-webbed sections lateral stability requirements of timber structures design of mechanical connections subjected to lateral and/or axial forces design of moment resisting rigid and semi-rigid connections racking design of multi-storey platform framed walls Featuring numerous detailed worked examples, the second edition has been thoroughly updated and includes information on the consequences of amendments and revisions to EC5 published since the first edition, and the significant additional requirements of BSI non contradictory, complimentary information document (PD 6693-1-1) relating to EC5. The new edition also includes a new section on axial stress conditions in composite sections, covering combined axial and bending stress conditions and reference to the major revisions to the design procedure for glued laminated timber.
Preface to the Second Edition xii 1 Timber as a Structural Material 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 The structure of timber 2 1.3 Types of timber 3 1.3.1 Softwoods 3 1.3.2 Hardwoods 4 1.4 Natural characteristics of timber 4 1.4.1 Knots 4 1.4.2 Slope of grain 5 1.4.3 Reaction wood 5 1.4.4 Juvenile wood 6 1.4.5 Density and annual ring widths 6 1.4.6 Conversion of timber 7 1.4.7 Seasoning 11 1.4.8 Seasoning defects 11 1.4.9 Cracks and fissures 11 1.4.10 Fungal decay 11 1.5 Strength grading of timber 11 1.5.1 Visual grading 12 1.5.2 Machine grading 12 1.5.3 Strength classes 15 1.6 Section sizes 16 1.7 Engineered wood products (EWPs) 16 1.7.1 Glued-laminated timber (glulam) 18 1.7.2 Cross-laminated timber (CLT or X-Lam) 20 1.7.3 Plywood 21 1.7.4 Laminated veneer lumber (LVL) 25 1.7.5 Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL), TimberStrand® 25 1.7.6 Parallel Strand Lumber (PSL), Parallam® 27 1.7.7 Oriented Strand Board (OSB) 27 1.7.8 Particleboards and fibre composites 39 1.7.9 Thin webbed joists (I-joists) 39 1.7.10 Thin webbed beams (box beams) 41 1.7.11 Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) 42 1.8 Suspended timber flooring 44 1.9 Adhesive bonding of timber 46 1.10 Preservative treatment for timber 47 1.11 Fire safety and resistance 48 1.12 References 50 2 Introduction to Relevant Eurocodes 52 2.1 Eurocodes: General structure 52 2.2 Eurocode 0: Basis of structural design (EC0) 54 2.2.1 Terms and definitions (EC0, 1.5) 54 2.2.2 Basic requirements (EC0, 2.1) 55 2.2.3 Reliability management (EC0, 2.2) 56 2.2.4 Design working life (EC0, 2.3) 56 2.2.5 Durability (EC0, 2.4) 57 2.2.6 Quality management (EC0, 2.5) 58 2.2.7 Principles of limit state design: General (EC0, 3.1) 58 2.2.8 Design situations (EC0, 3.2) 58 2.2.9 Ultimate limit states (EC0, 3.3) 59 2.2.10 Serviceability limit states (EC0, 3.4) 59 2.2.11 Limit states design (EC0, 3.5) 60 2.2.12 Classification of actions (EC0, 4.1.1) 60 2.2.13 Characteristic values of actions (EC0, 4.1.2) 60 2.2.14 Other representative values of variable actions (EC0, 4.1.3) 61 2.2.15 Material and product properties (EC0, 4.2) 62 2.2.16 Structural analysis (EC0, 5.1) 62 2.2.17 Verification by the partial factor method: General (EC0, 6.1) 65 2.2.18 Design values of actions (EC0, 6.3.1) 65 2.2.19 Design values of the effects of actions (EC0, 6.3.2) 66 2.2.20 Design values of material or product properties (EC0, 6.3.3) 66 2.2.21 Factors applied to a design strength at the ULS 71 2.2.22 Design values of geometrical data (EC0, 6.3.4) 71 2.2.23 Design resistance (EC0, 6.3.5) 71 2.2.24 Ultimate limit states (EC0, 6.4.1–6.4.5) 73 2.2.25 Serviceability limit states: General (EC0, 6.5) 77 2.3 Eurocode 5: Design of Timber Structures – Part 1-1: General – Common Rules and Rules for Buildings (EC5) 79 2.3.1 General matters 79 2.3.2 Serviceability limit states (EC5, 2.2.3) 80 2.3.3 Load duration and moisture influences on strength (EC5, 2.3.2.1) 84 2.3.4 Load duration and moisture influences on deformations (EC5, 2.3.2.2) 84 2.3.5 Stress–strain relations (EC5, 3.1.2) 87 2.3.6 Size and stress distribution effects (EC5, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 and 6.4.3) 87 2.3.7 System strength (EC5, 6.6) 90 2.4 Symbols 93 2.5 References 98 3 Using Mathcad® for Design Calculations 100 3.1 Introduction 100 3.2 What is Mathcad? 100 3.3 What does Mathcad do? 101 3.3.1 A simple calculation 101 3.3.2 Definitions and variables 102 3.3.3 Entering text 102 3.3.4 Working with units 103 3.3.5 Commonly used Mathcad functions 104 3.4 Summary 106 3.5 References 106 4 Design of Members Subjected to Flexure 107 4.1 Introduction 107 4.2 Design considerations 107 4.3 Design value of the effect of actions 109 4.4 Member span 109 4.5 Design for Ultimate Limit States (ULS) 110 4.5.1 Bending 110 4.5.2 Shear 121 4.5.3 Bearing (compression perpendicular to the grain) 127 4.5.4 Torsion 131 4.5.5 Combined shear and torsion 133 4.6 Design for Serviceability Limit States (SLS) 133 4.6.1 Deformation 134 4.6.2 Vibration 137 4.7 References 142 4.8 Examples 143 5 Design of Members and Walls Subjected to Axial or Combined Axial and Flexural Actions 158 5.1 Introduction 158 5.2 Design considerations 158 5.3 Design of members subjected to axial actions 160 5.3.1 Members subjected to axial compression 160 5.3.2 Members subjected to compression at an angle to the grain 170 5.3.3 Members subjected to axial tension 172 5.4 Members subjected to combined bending and axial loading 174 5.4.1 Where lateral torsional instability due to bending about the major axis will not occur 174 5.4.2 Lateral torsional instability under the effect of bending about the major axis 178 5.4.3 Members subjected to combined bending and axial tension 179 5.5 Design of stud walls 179 5.5.1 Design of load-bearing walls 180 5.5.2 Out of plane deflection of load-bearing stud walls (and columns) 186 5.6 References 188 5.7 Examples 189 6 Design of Glued-Laminated Members 216 6.1 Introduction 216 6.2 Design considerations 218 6.3 General 218 6.3.1 Horizontal and vertical glued-laminated timber 218 6.3.2 Design methodology 219 6.4 Design of glued-laminated members with tapered, curved or pitched curved profiles (also applicable to LVL members) 223 6.4.1 Design of single tapered beams 223 6.4.2 Design of double tapered beams, curved and pitched cambered beams 228 6.4.3 Design of double tapered beams, curved and pitched cambered beams subjected to combined shear and tension perpendicular to the grain 234 6.5 Finger joints 234 Annex 6.1 Deflection formulae for simply supported tapered and double tapered beams subjected to a point load at mid-span or to a uniformly distributed load. 234 Annex 6.2 Graphical representation of factors k§¤ and kp used in the derivation of the bending and radial stresses in the apex zone of double tapered curved and pitched cambered beams. 237 6.6 References 238 6.7 Examples 239 7 Design of Composite Timber and Wood-Based Sections 258 7.1 Introduction 258 7.2 Design considerations 259 7.3 Design of glued composite sections 260 7.3.1 Glued thin webbed beams 260 7.3.2 Glued thin flanged beams (stressed skin panels) 274 7.4 References 283 7.5 Examples 283 8 Design of Built-Up Columns 311 8.1 Introduction 311 8.2 Design considerations 311 8.3 General 312 8.4 Bending stiffness of built-up columns 313 8.4.1 The effective bending stiffness of built-up sections about the strong (y–y) axis 314 8.4.2 The effective bending stiffness of built-up sections about the z–z axis 316 8.4.3 Design procedure 318 8.4.4 Built-up sections – spaced columns 323 8.4.5 Built-up sections – latticed columns 327 8.5 Combined axial loading and moment 331 8.6 Effect of creep at the ULS 332 8.7 References 333 8.8 Examples 333 9 Design of Stability Bracing, Floor and Wall Diaphragms 357 9.1 Introduction 357 9.2 Design considerations 358 9.3 Lateral bracing 358 9.3.1 General 358 9.3.2 Bracing of single members (subjected to direct compression) by local support 360 9.3.3 Bracing of single members (subjected to bending) by local support 363 9.3.4 Bracing for beam, truss or column systems 364 9.4 Floor and roof diaphragms 368 9.4.1 Limitations on the applicability of the method 368 9.4.2 Simplified design procedure 368 9.5 The in-plane racking resistance of timber walls under horizontal and vertical loading 370 9.6 References 372 9.7 Examples 373 10 Design of Metal Dowel-type Connections 383 10.1 Introduction 383 10.1.1 Metal dowel-type fasteners 383 10.2 Design considerations 387 10.3 Failure theory and strength equations for laterally loaded connections formed using metal dowel fasteners 389 10.3.1 Dowel diameter 395 10.3.2 Characteristic fastener yield moment (My,Rk) 397 10.3.3 Characteristic embedment strength (fh,k) 398 10.3.4 Member thickness, t1 and t2 402 10.3.5 Friction effects and axial withdrawal of the fastener 403 10.3.6 Brittle failure 406 10.4 Multiple dowel fasteners loaded laterally 412 10.4.1 The effective number of fasteners 413 10.4.2 Alternating forces in connections 416 10.5 Design strength of a laterally loaded metal dowel connection 416 10.5.1 Loaded parallel to the grain 416 10.5.2 Loaded perpendicular to the grain 417 10.6 Examples of the design of connections using metal dowel-type fasteners 418 10.7 Multiple shear plane connections 418 10.8 Axial loading of metal dowel connection systems 420 10.8.1 Axially loaded nails 420 10.8.2 Axially loaded bolts 423 10.8.3 Axially loaded dowels 423 10.8.4 Axially loaded screws 423 10.9 Combined laterally and axially loaded metal dowel connections 427 10.10 Lateral stiffness of metal dowel connections at the SLS and ULS 428 10.11 Frame analysis incorporating the effect of lateral movement in metal dowel fastener connections 435 10.12 References 436 10.13 Examples 437 11 Design of Joints with Connectors 473 11.1 Introduction 473 11.2 Design considerations 473 11.3 Toothed-plate connectors 474 11.3.1 Strength behaviour 474 11.4 Ring and shear-plate connectors 480 11.4.1 Strength behaviour 480 11.5 Multiple shear plane connections 487 11.6 Brittle failure due to connection forces at an angle to the grain 487 11.7 Alternating forces in connections 487 11.8 Design strength of a laterally loaded connection 488 11.8.1 Loaded parallel to the grain 488 11.8.2 Loaded perpendicular to the grain 489 11.8.3 Loaded at an angle to the grain 489 11.9 Stiffness behaviour of toothed-plate, ring and shear-plate connectors 489 11.10 Frame analysis incorporating the effect of lateral movement in connections formed using toothed-plate, split-ring or shear-plate connectors 491 11.11 References 491 11.12 Examples 491 12 Moment Capacity of Connections Formed with Metal Dowel Fasteners or Connectors 504 12.1 Introduction 504 12.2 Design considerations 505 12.3 The effective number of fasteners in a row in a moment connection 505 12.4 Brittle failure 506 12.5 Moment behaviour in timber connections: Rigid model behaviour 507 12.5.1 Assumptions in the connection design procedure 507 12.5.2 Connection design procedure 509 12.5.3 Shear strength and force component checks on connections subjected to a moment and lateral forces 512 12.6 The analysis of structures with semi-rigid connections 519 12.6.1 The stiffness of semi-rigid moment connections 520 12.6.2 The analysis of beams with semi-rigid end connections 522 12.7 References 526 12.8 Examples 526 13 Racking Design of Multi-storey Platform Framed Wall Construction 555 13.1 Introduction 555 13.2 Conceptual design 555 13.3 Design requirements of racking walls 558 13.4 Loading 558 13.5 Basis of Method A 560 13.5.1 General requirements 560 13.5.2 Theoretical basis of the method 562 13.5.3 The EC5 procedure 564 13.6 Basis of the racking method in PD6693-1 573 13.6.1 General requirements 573 13.6.2 Theoretical basis of the method 575 13.6.3 The PD6693-1 procedure 579 13.7 References 586 13.8 Examples 587 Appendix A: Weights of Building Materials 610 Appendix B: Related British Standards for Timber Engineering in Buildings 612 Appendix C: Possible Revisions to be Addressed in a Corrigendum to EN 1995-1-1:2004 + A1:2008 614 Index 618 The Example Worksheets Order Form 624
Jack Porteous is a consulting engineer specialising in timber engineering. He is a Chartered Engineer, Fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers and Member of the Institution of Structural Engineers. He is a member of the BSI committee B/525/5, which is responsible for the structural use of timber in the UK and for the production of UK input to EN 1995-1-1. He is a member of the editorial advisory panel of the ICE publication, Construction Materials and a visiting scholar and lecturer in timber engineering at Edinburgh Napier University. Abdy Kermani is the Professor of Timber Engineering and Director of the UK’s Centre for Timber Engineering at Edinburgh Napier University. He is a Chartered Engineer, Fellow of the Institution of Structural Engineers and Fellow of the Institute of Wood Science. He has served on the organising committees and editorial technical advisory boards of international journals and conferences on timber engineering and the innovative use of construction materials. He is the appointed principal consultant to several UK and European structural and timber engineering firms and manufacturing industries.
Structural Timber Design to Eurocode 5 provides practising engineers and specialist contractors with comprehensive, detailed information and in-depth guidance on the design of timber structures based on the common rules and rules for buildings in Eurocode 5 – Part 1-1. It will also be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students of civil and structural engineering. It provides a step-by-step approach to the design of all of the commonly used timber elements and connections using solid timber, glued laminated timber or wood based structural products, and incorporates the requirements of the UK National Annex. It covers: strength and stiffness properties of timber and its reconstituted and engineered products key requirements of Eurocode 0, Eurocode 1 and Eurocode 5 – Part 1-1 design of beams and columns of solid timber, glued laminated, composite and thin-webbed sections lateral stability requirements of timber structures design of mechanical connections subjected to lateral and/or axial forces design of moment resisting rigid and semi-rigid connections Featuring numerous detailed worked examples, the second edition has been thoroughly updated and includes information on the consequences of amendments and revisions to EC5 published since the first edition, and the significant additional requirements of BSI non contradictory, complimentary information document (PD 6693-1-1) relating to EC5. The new edition also includes a new section on axial stress conditions in composite sections, covering combined axial and bending stress conditions and reference to the major revisions to the design procedure for glued laminated timber. From a review of the first edition ‘This is a must for all those involved in timber structures and their design...’—Building Engineer: July 2008

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