Cover

Table of Contents

Cover

The Blackwell Companions to Anthropology

Title page

Copyright page

Notes on Contributors

CHAPTER  1: Introduction: The Frontiers of Europe and European Ethnology

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

PART I: Europe’s Cardinal Directions

CHAPTER  2: The Anthropology of Mediterranean Societies

THE DISCOVERY OF MEDITERRANEAN SOCIETIES AS AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL SUBJECT

THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF MEDITERRANEAN SOCIETIES: MAJOR THEMES

CONCLUSION: THE MEDITERRANEAN SPACE – FROM CULTURE AREA TO HISTORICAL REGION?

CHAPTER  3: Nordic Reflections on Northern Social Research

COLONIALISM, YESTERDAY AND TODAY

CONCEPTIONS OF ETHNICITY

POLITICAL ECOLOGY

DOMESTICATING THE WILDERNESS

CHAPTER  4: Multiculturalism in North America and Europe

I

II

III

ETHNOCENTRISM

ESSENTIALISM

PRIMORDIALISM

IV

CHAPTER  5: Anthropology in Postsocialist Europe

THE ETHNOANTHROPOLOGY OF (POST)SOCIALISM

WHAT WAS SOCIALISM? AND WHAT IS POSTSOCIALISM?

POSTSOCIALIST TRANSFORMATIONS

CIVIL SOCIETY

PROPERTY RELATIONS

VANISHING AND EMERGING CLASSES

TRANSFORMATIONS OF LABOR AND PERSONHOOD

RESISTANCE

GENDER AND RELIGION

MEMORY AND NATION

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  6: Europe in Eurasia

INTRODUCTION

FABRICATIONS

RELIGION

POLITICS, GOVERNMENT, BUREAUCRACY

ECONOMY

KINSHIP, RELATEDNESS, THE PERSON

POSTSOCIALIST EASTERN EUROPE

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  7: Mitteleuropean Ethnology in Transition

ETHNOLOGY IN CENTRAL EUROPE TO THE MID-TWENTIETH CENTURY: THE CANON OF “NATIONAL SCIENCE”

ETHNOLOGY IN A DIVIDED CENTRAL EUROPE: CONVERGENCES AND DIVERGENCES

THE “ANTHROPOLOGICAL TURN” IN ETHNOLOGY – AN ATTEMPT TO TRANSFORM THE DISCIPLINE

CONCLUSION

PART II: European Integration

CHAPTER  8: Anthropological Studies of European Identity Construction

ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE EUROPEAN UNION

EU CULTURAL POLICIES

OFFICIALS INTO EUROPEANS?

BRINGING IN THE PEOPLE

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  9: Memory, Citizenship, and Consumer Culture in Postsocialist Europe

TRANSITION (TO) PREJUDICE

THE EUROPEANIZATION OF MEMORY

CONSUMERISM BETWEEN THE EAST AND THE WEST

THE POSTSOCIALIST CONSUMER ETHIC AND BORDER IMAGINARIES

CLAIMING EUROPEAN IDENTITY IN POSTSOCIALISM

EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP AND CONSUMER BELONGING

CHAPTER  10: The Europe of Regions and Borderlands

THE EUROPE OF THE REGIONS

A EUROPE OF BORDERLANDS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  11: Citizenship(s) in European Contexts

CITIZENSHIP IN THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE

“UNBUNDLING” CITIZENSHIP AND NATIONNESS

EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP, CITIZENSHIP OF/IN EUROPE

CITIZENS AS POLITICAL SUBJECTS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  12: Local Practices of European Identity on the New Eastern Borders of the EU

“WE DO NOT HAVE TO BE ENLIGHTENED,” OR “THERE HAS ALREADY BEEN A UNION HERE”

“ENTERING SCHENGEN HAS BEEN A CATASTROPHE FOR THIS REGION,” OR “WHERE ARE THE BORDERS OF EUROPE?”

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  13: European Politics, Policies, and Institutions

QUESTIONING THE EU AND EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

CULTURES AND POWER IN EU INSTITUTIONS

POLICIES IN PLACES, EXPERIENCING EUROPE

FROM POLICIES TO POLITICS AND SOCIETIES: FEARS IN THE IMAGININGS OF EUROPE

CONCLUSION

PART III: European Heritages

CHAPTER  14: Presencing Europe’s Pasts

PAST PRESENCING

MAKING HISTORIES, TRADITIONS, AND EUROPES

OTHER HISTORIES AND HISTORICAL CONSCIOUSNESSES

COMMODIFICATION, HERITAGE, AND NOSTALGIA

MATERIAL, EMBODIED, AND AFFECTIVE PASTS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  15: An Anthropology of War and Recovery: Lived War Experiences

WHAT HAPPENED, AND WHY?

WRITING AS ACTING: THE QUANDARIES OF PARTIALITY

DAILY LIFE IN WAR

BELONGING TO EUROPE

LIVED EXPERIENCES AND IDENTIFICATIONS

ETHNOGRAPHIES OF POSTWAR DEVELOPMENTS

ANTHROPOLOGISTS’ CONTRIBUTIONS TO RECOVERY AND UNDERSTANDING

LOOKING AHEAD, GRASPING CONTRADICTIONS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

CHAPTER  16: European Religious Fragmentation and the Rise of Civil Religion

A CHRISTIAN EUROPE?

RENEWAL AND REVIVAL

RELIGIOUS FRAGMENTATION AS A PARADIGM

THE EXISTENTIAL IN RELIGION

CIVIL RELIGION IN EUROPE

SILENT MARCHES

THE SACRED SELF

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  17: Studying Muslims of Europe

DEFINING MUSLIMS

ANTHROPOLOGY OF MUSLIMS OF EUROPE OR IN EUROPE?

RETHINKING THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDY OF MUSLIMS AS “OF EUROPE”

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  18: Roma and Sinti: The “Other” within Europe

EU PROJECTS FOR ROMA IN SLOVAKIA

THE HISTORIC CONSTRUCTION OF THE “GYPSY”

BETWEEN PATERNALISM AND MARGINALIZATION

THE REPRODUCTION OF THE “GYPSY IMAGE” IN SLOVAKIA AND EU-FINANCED PROJECTS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  19: Landscape, Landscape History, and Landscape Theory

ON THE GENESIS OF THE MODERN EUROPEAN CONCEPT OF LANDSCAPE

LANDSCAPE IN CURRENT RESEARCH DISCOURSE

CONCEPTUALIZATIONS AND CASE STUDIES

CONCLUSION

PART IV: Cultural Practice

CHAPTER  20: European Tourism

ARMCHAIR TRAVELERS AND TOURIST PIONEERS

GOING ABROAD

SUN, SAND, SEA, AND SIN

CITY BREAKS

DOUBLE HOMES

LOCALS, TOURISTS, AND ANTI-TOURISTS

THE EUROPEAN EXPERIENCE

CHAPTER  21: The Diversity of European Food Cultures

THE EMERGENCE OF FOOD DIVERSITY IN EUROPE

INDUSTRIALIZATION, SCIENTIFICATION, LIFESTYLE FORMATION

FOOD SAFETY, CONSUMER RIGHTS, AND AUDIT CULTURE

EUROPEAN QUALITY LABELS: BLUEPRINTS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF COMMODITY-HERITAGE

MANAGED DIVERSITY, MESSY HISTORIES: THE CASE OF HALLOUMI CHEESE IN CYPRUS

CONCLUSION: MATERIAL CULTURE AND EUROPEAN PRODUCTS

CHAPTER  22: Language, Power, and Politics in Europe

THE HERDERIAN MODEL OF LANGUAGE

LANGUAGE AND POWER

ROOTEDNESS AND TERRITORY

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EUROPEAN

THE WAY FORWARD

CHAPTER  23: Europe at the Crossroads of Rights and Culture(s)

TOPOGRAPHIES OF CULTURAL RIGHTS

MAPPING THE CONCEPTUAL TERRAIN

CULTURAL RIGHTS AND LOSSES

EUROPE AND CULTURAL RIGHTS

CHAPTER  24: Corporate Social Responsibility and Cultural Practices on Globalizing Markets

ENTRY POINT: CONTESTED CORPORATE INTERESTS

THE ASCENDANCE OF AN IDEA

AN AGILE ASSEMBLAGE OF IDEAS

TOOLS, TECHNOLOGIES, AND THE SOCIAL LIFE OF STANDARDS

UNIVERSALIZING VALUES

LOOKING AHEAD

CHAPTER  25: Extreme Neo-nationalist Music Scenes at the Heart of Europe

THE EMBODIMENT OF PLACE AND POSSIBILITIES FOR EXPRESSION

FEELING EUROPEAN AND THE LIMITS OF MUSICAL EXPRESSION

MEANWHILE, BACK ON THE “THICK” EU-DESCRIPTIVE CARPATHIAN TRAIL

BLACK METAL BACK STORY

ALTER-EUROPE AND THE LOVE OF HATE

CHAPTER  26: Anthropological Perspectives on the European Urban Landscape

FACING THE CITY

ANTHROPOLOGIZING CITIES?

CONCLUSION

PART V: Disciplinary Boundary Crossings

CHAPTER  27: Medical Anthropology and Anthropological Studies of Science

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGIES

ANTHROPOLOGIES OF SCIENCE

BOYS WITH TOYS

WOMEN THROW OUT NATURE

ANTHROPOLOGIES OF BIOMEDICINE(S)

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  28: Uses of the Internet in European Ethnographic Research

INTERNET AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES EVERYWHERE

FROM VIRTUAL TO CONNECTIVE ETHNOGRAPHIES

EXPERIENCING TECHNOLOGY IN EVERYDAY ETHNOGRAPHY

ETHNOGRAPHY: FUNDAMENTALS AND TRANSFORMATIONS

CHAPTER  29: Visual Culture, Ethnography, and Interactive Media

CASE STUDY: INTERACTIVE VILLAGE (BRICOLAGE WITH INTENT)

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER  30: Hybrid Worlds of Europe: Theoretical and Practical Aspects

HYBRIDITY

SITUATION OF DEPARTURE

TALKING ABOUT OTHERS AND OTHERNESS

HYBRIDOLOGY AS A THEORETICAL CONCEPT

MINORITY RESEARCH AND HYBRIDITY

PRACTICAL AND POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS

CONCLUSION

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

CHAPTER  31: An Anthropological Perspective on Literary Arts in Ireland

CREATIVITY, CRAFTSMANSHIP, COLLABORATION

TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING

ANTHROPOLOGY AND CREATIVE WRITING: BLURRED GENRES

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

CHAPTER  32: Toward an Ethnoecology of Place and Displacement

DISPLACEMENT: THREE STORIES

DISPLACEMENT: FORMS, EXPERIENCES, NARRATIVES

BELONGING IN AND OUT OF PLACE

HEALING THE WOUNDS OF MEMORY

REPLACEMENTS

CHAPTER  33: A Tale of Two Disciplines: European Ethnology and the Anthropology of Europe

THE TWO TRIANGLES

THE MAKING OF AN ETHNOLOGIST

THE CLASS DEFECTOR’S DILEMMA

DISCOVERING THE PEOPLE

DOCUMENTATION

THE DIFFERENT

THE MAKING OF AN ANTHROPOLOGIST

WITH IRELAND AS MODEL

CLOSING UP AND REINVENTING

THE WAY OF DOING THINGS

Index

The Blackwell Companions to Anthropology offer a series of comprehensive syntheses of the traditional subdisciplines, primary subjects, and geographic areas of inquiry for the field. Taken together, the series represents both a contemporary survey of anthropology and a cutting edge guide to the emerging research and intellectual trends in the field as a whole.

1. A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology edited by Alessandro Duranti

2. A Companion to the Anthropology of Politics edited by David Nugent and Joan Vincent

3. A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians edited by Thomas Biolsi

4. A Companion to Psychological Anthropology edited by Conerly Casey and Robert B. Edgerton

5. A Companion to the Anthropology of Japan edited by Jennifer Robertson

6. A Companion to Latin American Anthropology edited by Deborah Poole

7. A Companion to Biological Anthropology edited by Clark Larsen (hardback only)

8. A Companion to the Anthropology of India edited by Isabelle Clark-Decès

9. A Companion to Medical Anthropology edited by Merrill Singer and Pamela I. Erickson

10. A Companion to Cognitive Anthropology edited by David B. Kronenfeld, Giovanni Bennardo, Victor de Munck, and Michael D. Fischer

11. A Companion to Cultural Resource Management edited by Thomas King

12. A Companion to the Anthropology of Education edited by Bradley A. U. Levinson and Mica Pollack

13. A Companion to the Anthropology of the Body and Embodiment edited by Frances E. Mascia-Lees

14. A Companion to Paleopathology edited by Anne L. Grauer

15. A Companion to Folklore edited by Regina F. Bendix and Galit Hasan-Rokem

16. A Companion to Forensic Anthropology edited by Dennis Dirkmaat

17. A Companion to the Anthropology of Europe edited by Ullrich Kockel, Máiréad Nic Craith, and Jonas Frykman

Forthcoming

A Companion to Paleoanthropology, edited by David Begun

A Companion to Chinese Archaeology, edited by Anne Underhill

A Companion to Border Studies, edited by Thomas M. Wilson and Hastings Donnan

Title page

Notes on Contributors

Elisenda Ardévol is a senior lecturer in the Arts and Humanities Department at the Open University of Catalonia. She also collaborates with the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her doctoral dissertation focused on visual anthropology and ethnographic cinema. During her career, she has taught courses and seminars in different Spanish universities and cultural institutions, and she also has been visiting scholar at the Center for Visual Anthropology, at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. She carried out fieldwork among the gypsy community of Granada, in Afro-American religious communities of Los Angeles, and in the Courts of Justice in Barcelona. She is currently doing research about the Internet, new media, online sociability, and digital cultures. Elisenda is also involved in the Master of Creative Documentary program at the University of Barcelona. She has a strong publishing record.

Hugh Beach studied anthropology at Harvard College and as a young man participated in a year of study and travel with Gregory Bateson. He has lived among Sámi reindeer herders for many years in Sweden, Norway, and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. In Swedish Sápmi, he has studied changes in reindeer herding practices and also the effects of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. He has worked as a reindeer herder in Alaska with the Inuit NANA Regional Corporation herd, and is specialized in the study of indigenous circumpolar peoples. He has been Chairman of the Swedish Minority Rights Group and expert adviser on Sámi affairs to Sweden’s first two ombudsmen against ethnic discrimination. He is now Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Uppsala University, Sweden. He has led and been engaged in a number of interdisciplinary and international research projects. Currently he is principal investigator for the American NSF funded IPY project Dynamics of Circumpolar Land Use and Ethnicity (CLUE): Social Impacts of Policy and Climate Change.

Michał Buchowski is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Poznax144_MinionPro-Regular_10n_000100 and Professor of Comparative Central European Studies at European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder). He also lectured as a visiting professor at Rutgers University and Columbia University. His scientific interest is in anthropological theories and in Central European postsocialist cultural and social transformations. He has published several articles in reviewed journals and edited volumes as well as books, among them in English Reluctant Capitalists (1997), The Rational Other (1997), Rethinking Transformation (2001), and in Polish, To Understand the Other (2004). He is also the coeditor of Poland Beyond Communism (with Eduard Conte and Carole Nagengast, 2001) and The Making of the Other in Central Europe (with Box17C_DoulosSIL_9n_000100ena Chołuj, 2001). He currently serves as a head of the Department of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology in Poznax144_MinionPro-Regular_10n_000100 and was president of the European Association of Social Anthropologists in 2009 and 2010.

Reginald Byron, born in 1944, is University of Wales Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology and Research Professor of Anthropology at Union College, Schenectady, New York. He is the author, editor, or coeditor of 12 books on economic, political, social, and cultural anthropology including Irish America (1999), Music, Culture, and Experience (1995), Retrenchment and Regeneration in Rural Newfoundland (2003), Migration and Marriage (with Barbara Waldis, 2006), and Negotiating Culture (with Ullrich Kockel, 2006).

Marion Demossier is Professor of Anthropology and French Studies at the University of Southampton. Her research focuses on how global forces and policies impact on specific groups and “communities” in French and European societies, and she has just published a monograph entitled Wine and National Identity: Drinking Culture in France with the University of Wales Press. She has also published extensively on rural societies (terroir), and European and French politics.

Adolfo Estalella is a researcher working in the field of science and technology studies with an anthropological perspective. He has been working on the topic of technological hopes and expectations around the Internet and on the intersection of art, science, and technology. His theoretical approach is based on actor-network theory with an ethnographic orientation. His research topics are cyberculture, digital method for social science research, and ethics of Internet research.

Elena Filippova is an anthropologist and senior researcher in the Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology at the Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow). She earned her Diploma in History and PhD in Ethnology and Anthropology from Lomonossoff Moscow State University. Elena publishes on migration and identity issues, with a particular interest in French society. Her research topics include cross-national comparison of ethnic and racial classification practices on censuses worldwide, scientific concepts of ethnicity, nationality, and citizenship.

Norbert Fischer holds an MA in cultural anthropology from the University of Hamburg, and has a PhD in social history. He completed his habilitation in 2008. He was appointed as an associate professor at University of Hamburg. His research interests include landscape history and theory, regional studies, spatial change, and urbanization processes in the twentieth century, the history of death, and the development of the cemetery and funeral culture. His many publications include Inszenierungen der Küste (2007, ed., with B. Schmidt-Lauber and S. Müller-Wusterwitz), Vom Hamburger Umland zur Metropolregion (2008), and Landschaft als kulturwissenschaftliche Kategorie (2008).

Jonas Frykman is Professor of European Ethnology at Lund University. His publications include Identities in Pain (with Nadia Seremitakis, 1997), Articulating Europe: Local Perspectives (with Peter Niedermüller, 2003), and Sense of Community: Trust Hope and Worries in the Welfare State (with Bo Rothstein et al., 2009).

Christina Garsten is Professor of Social Anthropology in the Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University. Her research interests are oriented toward the anthropology of organizations, with focus on the globalization of corporations and markets and on emerging forms of governance in transnational trade. In this vein of research, she has studied the perspectives of corporate managers in Sweden and in the United States on accountability and ethics as well as the models for social accountability that are expressed in codes of conduct, soft law, policies, and other voluntary forms of regulation. Her current research engagement is focused on the study of the role of international think tanks in the fashioning of global markets.

Christian Giordano holds a doctorate in sociology from the University of Heidelberg. His habilitation in anthropology was completed at the University of Frankfurt am Main. Christian is Full Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland and holds many other honors and positions. These include a Dr Honoris Causa from the University of Timisoara: a permanent guest professorship at the Universities of Bucharest, Murcia, and Bydgoszcz; and guest lectureships at the Universities of Naples, Asuncion, Berlin (Humboldt University), Moscow (Russian State University for Humanities), Torun, Zürich and Kuala Lumpur (University of Malaya). His main research interests include political anthropology, economic anthropology, historical anthropology and his geographical foci include Southeast Europe, Mediterranean societies, and Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Singapore).

Valdimar Tr. Hafstein is Associate Professor of Folkloristics/Ethnology in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Iceland, and also teaches occasionally at the University of California, Berkeley, at Georg-August University, Göttingen, and at Tartu University, as well as in the Icelandic Academy of the Arts. His publications from recent years focus on cultural heritage as a concept, category, and social dynamic, and on intellectual property in traditional expression. His book on the making of intangible cultural heritage in UNESCO is forthcoming from the University of Illinois Press and he is presently involved in a European collaborative research project, Copyrighting Creativity.

Chris Hann is a founding director of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle, Germany, where his research group has recently concluded a large-scale project on religion after socialism (www.eth.mpg.de). He is coeditor of Eastern Christians in Anthropological Perspective (with Hermann Goltz, 2010). Other research foci include theories of ethnicity and nationalism, and economic anthropology. His publications include Economic Anthropology: History, Ethnography, Critique (with Keith Hart, 2011).

Gabriela Kiliánová, PhD CSc, is a senior research fellow and the director of the Institute of Ethnology of Slovak Academy of Sciences. Her main research interests involve collective identity and memory, oral traditions, modernization processes, burial rituals, and history of ethnology. She has conducted field work in Slovakia and Central Europe (Hungary, Austria). Along with E. Krekovix10D_Galliard-Roman_10n_000100ová and E. Kowalská, she recently (2009) published My a tí druhí v modernej spolox10D_Galliard-Italic_10n_000100nosti: Konštrukcie a transformácie kolektívnych identít [Us and the others in modern society: Constructions and transformations of collective identities].

Ullrich Kockel was appointed Professor of Ethnology at the University of Ulster in 2005, having been Professor of European Studies at the University of the West of England, Bristol, since 2000. In the 1980s and 1990s, following an earlier career in industry, he held research and teaching appointments in Germany, Ireland, England, and Scotland, including at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Irish Studies and University College Cork’s Department of Geography. The author and editor of more than 10 books and an Academician of the UK’s Academy of Social Sciences, he is currently editor of the Anthropological Journal of European Cultures and President of the Société Internationale d’Ethnologie et de Folklore.

Sabrina Kopf is a doctoral student and lecturer at the University of Vienna, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology. She has studied EU projects and their impact on local Roma communities in Slovakia. Currently, she is working on her doctoral thesis on democracy assistance projects and socio-cultural negotiations of “civil society” and “good governance” in social networks in Serbia, especially Vojvodina.

Orvar Löfgren is Professor Emeritus of European Ethnology at Lund University. His main field is the cultural analysis of everyday life. He has worked with studies of media and consumption, tourism and travel, as well as studies of national identities and transnational processes. Among his recent books are Magic, Culture and Economy (ed., with Robert Willim, 2005), Off the Edge: Experiments in Cultural Analysis (ed., with Richard Wilk, 2006), and The Secret World of Doing Nothing (with Billy Ehn, 2010).

Sharon Macdonald is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester, England. She has carried out anthropological fieldwork in Scotland, England, and Germany, and worked on topics including museums, heritage, science, and identity. Her publications include Inside European Identities (ed., 1993); Reimagining Culture: Histories, Identities and the Gaelic Renaissance (1997); Behind the Scenes at the Science Museum (2002); A Companion to Museum Studies (ed., 2006); and Difficult Heritage: Negotiating the Nazi Past in Nuremberg and Beyond (2009). Her next book is entitled Memorylands: Heritage and Identity Complexes in Europe.

Peter Jan Margry is an ethnologist. He studied history at the University of Amsterdam, and was awarded his PhD by the University of Tilburg (2000) for his dissertation on the religious culture war in nineteenth-century Netherlands. He is a senior research fellow at the Meertens Institute, a research center on the culture and language of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam. He is also guest professor of Religious Studies at the University of Leuven. His work focuses on contemporary religious cultures, on rituals and on cultural memory. Recent books are Shrines and Pilgrimage in the Modern World: New Itineraries into the Sacred (2008) and Grassroots Memorials: The Politics of Memorializing Traumatic Death (with Cristina Sánchez-Carretero, 2011).

Gabriele Marranci is a visiting senior fellow at the National University of Singapore, Department of Sociology as well as honorary professor at the Centre for the Study of Islam in the United Kingdom, University of Cardiff. He is an anthropologist by training, working on Muslim societies. His main research interests concern youth identity, religion, extremism, fundamentalism, political Islam, secularization processes. He is the author of four monographs: Jihad Beyond Islam (2006); The Anthropology of Islam (2008); Understanding Muslim Identity: Rethinking Fundamentalism (2009); and Faith, Ideology and Fear: Muslim Identities Within and Beyond Prisons (2009). He is the founding editor of the journal Islam: Dynamics of Muslim Life, and the book series Muslims in Global Societies.

Maryon McDonald is Fellow in Social Anthropology at Robinson College, Cambridge, and has long engaged with the anthropology of Europe. She has both studied and advised the European Commission. In Cambridge, she has run courses on European Anthropology, Medical Anthropology, and Science and Society, and is a member of the Royal Anthropological Institute’s Medical Anthropology Committee in the United Kingdom and of the European ELPAT group (Ethical, Legal, and Psychosocial aspects of Organ Transplantation). Along with Marilyn Strathern, she founded and ran a research group on Comparative Issues in Biotechnology and Accountability (CBA) from 2002–2008, and is just completing a Leverhulme-funded research project examining changing understandings of the human body.

David Murphy is a part-time lecturer and tutor with the Department of Anthropology at NUI Maynooth, Ireland. In 2005 he was awarded the John Hume Scholarship for his PhD research into the Serbian and wider Slavic black metal music scene. His research interests include the Balkans, anthropology of the body, new social movements, neo-paganism, neo-nationalism, musicology, and contemporary sovereignty. David is currently a board member of the Centre for the Study of Wider Europe, and public relations officer with the Anthropological Association of Ireland.

Catherine Neveu is Director of Research at the IIAC-LAIOS (Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Anthropologie du Contemporain, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie des Institutions et des Organisations Sociales), CNRS-EHESS, Paris. She studies citizenship processes in different contexts in Europe. Her main research topics are political subjectivation, cultural dimensions of citizenship, and relationships between citizenship(s), space(s) and sites.

Máiréad Nic Craith is Professor of European Culture and Society at the University of Ulster. As the author or editor of 14 books, she was joint winner of the 2004 Ruth Michaelis-Jena Ratcliff research prize for folklife. In 2006, she was awarded a Senior Distinguished Research Fellowship at the University of Ulster, and in 2009 she was elected to the Royal Irish Academy. She served as a panel member for the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise in the United Kingdom and is again involved in the 2013 Research Excellence Framework audit. In 2011, she was invited by the United Nations as an expert on heritage and human rights.

Maja Povrzanovix107_Galliard-Bold_10n_000100 Frykman is an associate professor at the Department of Global Political Studies, Malmö University. Her dissertation in Ethnology, Culture and Fear: Wartime Everyday Life in Croatia 1991–1992 was defended at the University of Zagreb. Her main areas of research include concepts and practices within the semantic domains of diaspora and transnationalism, relations between place and identity, labor- and refugee-migrants in Sweden, experiences of war and exile, and war-related identification processes. Her major publications include the edited volumes War, Exile, Everyday Life: Cultural Perspectives (with Renata Jambrešc Kirin, 1996), Beyond Integration: Challenges of Belonging in Diaspora and Exile (2001), and Transnational Spaces: Disciplinary Perspectives (2004).

Christiane Schwab is currently a research assistant and PhD candidate at the Department of European Ethnology at the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich. She holds an MA in European Ethnology from the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich and has worked as a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley. Her research interests center on urban anthropology, Spanish cultural history, and historical anthropology.

Martin Skrydstrup holds a PhD in cultural anthropology from Columbia University and is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Waterworlds project, Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen. In his doctoral research, Martin sought to understand repatriation claims by way of intersecting exchange theory and postcolonial theory. Most generally, his publications address the relationships between culture and property departing from various repatriation claims set in Greenland, Hawaii, Ghana, and Iceland with their various postcolonial and postimperial entanglements.

Justyna Straczuk is an assistant professor at the Polish Academy of Science in Warsaw. She has conducted long-term fieldwork in the borderland of Poland, Belarus, and Lithuania, and has produced many publications on the region, including two books: Jx119_Galliard-Italic_10n_000100zyk i tox17C_Galliard-Italic_10n_000100samox15B_Galliard-Italic_10n_000100d człowieka w warunkach społecznej wielojx119_Galliard-Italic_10n_000100zycznox15B_Galliard-Italic_10n_000100ci: Pogranicze polsko-litewsko-białoruskie [Language and identity in multilingual communities: Polish-Lithuanian-Belarusian borderland] (1999) and Cmentarz i stół: Pogranicze prawosławno-katolickie w Polsce i na Białorusi [A cemetery and a table: Catholic-Orthodox borderland in Poland and Belarus] (2006). Her current research interests are border issues, Eastern Christian spirituality, and anthropology of emotions.

Elka Tschernokoshewa is head of the Department of Empirical Cultural Studies and Anthropology at the Sorbian Institute, Bautzen, Germany. She was born in Sofia, Bulgaria, and went on to study cultural studies and aesthetics in Berlin. She received her doctorate from Humboldt University Berlin and post-doctorate from Sofia. She has held a number of visiting professorships at the Universities of Bristol, Basel, Tübingen, Leipzig, Bremen, and Sofia. Elka is a founding member of the European Research Institute for Culture and the Arts (ERICarts) and a board member of the European Association of Cultural Researchers (ECURES). Her main research interests are cultural diversity, minorities, gender and comparative studies, and Eastern–Western Europe. She is editor of the book series Hybride Welten.

Ksenija Vidmar Horvat completed her PhD in sociology at the University of California, Davis, USA and is currently associate professor and head of the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Her research interests include questions of cultural identity, social theory of Europe, cosmopolitanism, and multiculturalism. Most recent publications and articles include “Mitteleuropa and the European Heritage” (with Gerard Delanty, 2008); Maps of In-betweeness: Essays on European Culture and Identity After the End of the Cold War (2009), and “Multiculturalism in Time of Terrorism: Re-imagining Europe Post-9/11” (2010).

Gisela Welz was appointed Professor and Chair of Cultural Anthropology and European Ethnology at Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Germany in 1998. As a research fellow and visiting professor, she has taught at UCLA, NYU, the University of Cyprus, ISCTE Lisbon, and the University of Manchester. Most of her recent publications and research projects address Europeanization issues, with a focus on Cyprus as a case study. In 2006, she coedited, with Yiannis Papadakis and Nicos Peristianis, an anthology titled Divided Cyprus. Modernity, History, and an Island in Conflict. In 2009, she published the essay collection Projekte der Europäisierung in cooperation with Annina Lottermann.

Lisanne Wilken, DPhil is an anthropologist from Copenhagen University and associate professor at the Department for European Studies at Århus University. She has conducted extensive research on cultural aspects of European integration including research on institutional support for linguistic minorities, minorities’ strategies toward integration in the EU, everyday life and food consumption in Europe, and on media representations of “other” Europeans. She is currently working on a project on exchange students and integration.

Thomas M. Wilson is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University, State University of New York. He has conducted ethnographic research in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Hungary, and Canada. Among his most recent books are The Anthropology of Ireland (with Hastings Donnan, 2006), Drinking Cultures (ed., 2005), Europeanisation and Hibernicisation: Ireland and Europe (ed., with Cathal McCall, 2010), and The Blackwell Companion to Border Studies (ed., with Hastings Donnan, in press). In 2008–2010 he was President of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe.

Terence Wright is Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Ulster. His films include The Firemen of Dolní Rovenˇ (45 mins) 2006; Migrations, 2006 (gallery installation); and The Interactive Village, 2007 (non-linear digital ethnography). For 10 years he worked for BBC Television News and Current Affairs, and Independent Television News (ITN). He has written widely on the subject of visual anthropology and is the author of Visual Impact: Culture and the Meaning of Images (2008) and The Photography Handbook (1999). Formerly he was senior research officer at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford where he ran the project Moving Images: The Media Representation of Refugees. He taught at the UK’s National Film and Television School from 1989–1997.

Helena Wulff is Professor of Social Anthropology at Stockholm University. Her current research engages with expressive cultural forms in a transnational perspective and questions of place, mobility, the emotions, visual culture, and recently of writing as process and form focusing on Irish contemporary writers. Her major publications include Ballet across Borders (1998) and Dancing at the Crossroads (2007). She was editor of The Emotions (2007) and coeditor of Youth Cultures (with Vered Amit-Talai, 1995), New Technologies at Work (with Christina Garsten, 2003), and Ethnographic Practice in the Present (with Marit Melhuus and Jon P. Mitchell, 2009).