Cover

Table of Contents

Cover

Series page

Title page

Copyright page

Figures and Table

FIGURES

TABLE

Notes on Contributors

CHAPTER  1 Borders and Border Studies

OF DISCIPLINES AND CASE STUDIES

BORDER STUDIES TODAY

CONCLUSION

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

PART I: Sovereignty, Territory and Governance

CHAPTER 2 Partition

TYPES OF PARTITION

EXPLAINING PARTITION

THE POLITICS OF PARTITION

JUSTIFICATIONS OF PARTITION

THE COUNTERCLAIMS OF ANTIPARTITIONISTS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 3 Culture Theory and the US–Mexico Border

THE BORDER CULTURE DEBATE AND BEYOND

A BASIC TYPOLOGY

THE HISTORICAL CONSTRUCTION OF “MEXICO” AND THE “UNITED STATES”

THE PRODUCTION OF CULTURES AND IDENTITIES IN THE US-MEXICAN BORDERLANDS

COMBINED AND UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURE

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 4 The African Union Border Programme in European Comparative Perspective

AFRICA AND EUROPE COMPARED

THE BORDER FOCUS IN THE EUROPEAN INTEGRATION PROCESS

AFRICAN BORDER POLICY AND THE ORGANISATION OF AFRICAN UNITY (OAU), 1963–2002

THE AFRICAN UNION BORDER PROGRAMME

THE CHALLENGES OF COMPARATIVE HISTORICIZATION

CHAPTER 5 European Politics of Borders, Border Symbolism and Cross-Border Cooperation

EUROPEAN INTEGRATION AND THE STUDY OF BORDERS

THE BORDERING PERSPECTIVE

INTERPRETING CROSS-BORDER COOPERATION THROUGH A BORDERING PERSPECTIVE

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 6 Securing Borders in Europe and North America

CONCEPTUAL ISSUES

THE EUROPEAN UNION’S SCHENGEN AGREEMENT

THE CANADA–UNITED STATES PERIMETER

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 7 Border Regimes, the Circulation of Violence and the Neo-authoritarian Turn

EXTERNAL BORDERS AND INTERNAL LINES

CIRCULATING VIOLENCE

CORPORATE LIMITED LIABILITY IN THE NEW EUROPEAN BORDER REGIME

SECURITY

PART II: States, Nations and Empires

CHAPTER 8 Borders in the New Imperialism

THREE HISTORICAL TRANSITIONS AND STATE TERRITORIALITY

“POLITICS/ECONOMICS” IN CAPITALISM

FROM FORMAL TO INFORMAL EMPIRES

NATIONALISM AND NATIONAL STATES

MIGRANT LABOR AND CROSS-BORDER FIXES FOR CRISES

GLOBAL TURBULENCE AND DECLINING HEGEMONY

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 9 Contested States, Frontiers and Cities

ETHNONATIONAL BORDER CONFLICTS THROUGH THE PRISM OF FRONTIERS AND CITIES

REFLECTIONS ON CHANGING FRONTIER ZONES, CITIES AND ETHNONATIONAL CONFLICTS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 10 The State, Hegemony and the Historical British-US Border

THE STATE AND SOVEREIGNTY

THE BORDERLANDS

THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: THE SOVEREIGN CONSTRUCTION

CONCLUSION

REVISITING THE BORDERLAND CENTURIES LATER

CHAPTER 11 Nations, Nationalism and “Borderization” in the Southern Cone

THE THREE PHASES OF INTERSTATE BORDER THEORY

TWO ESSENTIALISMS: FRATERNITY AND HYBRIDISM

BORDER, NATION AND STATE

IDENTITY BORDERS AND BORDERS OF MEANING

REGIONAL INTEGRATION AND NATIONALISM

CHAPTER 12 Debordering and Rebordering the United Kingdom

SECURITY AND THE UK BORDER

THE IRISH BORDER: LEAVING THE BACK DOOR AJAR?

THE BRITISH BORDER

A BRITISH ISLES BORDER OR THE SCHENGEN FRONTIER?

THE IMAGINED UK BORDER

REBORDERING AND REGIONALIZATION

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 13 “Swarming” at the Frontiers of France, 1870–1885

COMMUNARD BARRICADE: STREETS AND LIVING ROOMS TURNED OUTSIDE/IN AND INSIDE/OUT

THE MORAL REHABILITATION OF VAGABONDAGE ON THE NEW CALEDONIAN FRONTIER

“CONFUSIONS” ON ISLES DES PINS, OR THE RIGHT TO GO NATIVE

“NO ONE ANSWERS BECAUSE THERE IS NOTHING TO ANSWER”: THE ISSUE OF AMNESTY

“SWARMING” BORDERS, “SWARMING” BORDER STUDIES

CHAPTER 14 Borders and Conflict Resolution

DEMARCATING BORDERS IN CONFLICT ZONES

THE GREEN LINE: THE EVOLUTION OF A BOUNDARY IN CONFLICT

CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND TERRITORIAL AND CARTOGRAPHIC IMAGINATIONS

SECURITIZATION DISCOURSES AND BORDER DEMARCATION

TERRITORIAL ALTERNATIVES TO A TWO STATE SOLUTION

CONCLUSION

PART III: Security, Order and Disorder

CHAPTER 15 Chaos and Order along the (Former) Iron Curtain

CLOSING THE BORDER

OPENING THE BORDER

MAKING IT STICK

CHAPTER 16 Border Security as Late-Capitalist “Fix”

LABOR AND LATE CAPITALISM: THE IMMIGRATION-SECURITY FIX

CONSUMPTION, DATABASING AND THE POST–9/11 SECURITY-INDUSTRIAL “FIX”

THE BIOMETRIC “FIX”: THE SECURITY SURPLUS AND THE DEATH OF ACCOUNTABILITY

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 17 Identity, the State and Borderline Disorder

ISRAELI SECURITY IN THE 1950S: THE QUEST FOR BORDERS AS CONTAINERS

THE LANGUAGE OF THE BORDER

1967: SHIFTING THE BORDER, MODIFYING PRACTICES, UPDATING DISCOURSE

THE RISE AND FALL OF THE (NEW) GREEN LINE

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 18 African Boundaries and the New Capitalist Frontier

PLURAL BOUNDARIES

CROSS-BORDER REGULATION

THE POLITICS OF SCALE

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 19 Bandits, Borderlands and Opium Wars in Afghanistan

WARS, STATES, BORDERLANDS AND ILLICIT FLOWS

SHEGHNAN: A BORDERLAND HISTORY

MUJAHIDEEN GOVERNMENT (1992–1996) AND TALIBAN RULE (1996–2001)

THE “POST-TALIBAN PERIOD” (2001–PRESENT)

AZIZ, A BORDERLAND ENTREPRENEUR

INSTITUTIONS OF EXTRACTION AND POLITICAL NETWORKS

BORDERS AND BORDERLANDS

DRUGS AS A CATALYST FOR DEVELOPMENT AND STATE FORMATION?

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 20 Biosecurity, Quarantine and Life across the Border

AN ORGANIC HISTORY OF THE BORDER

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 21 Permeabilities, Ecology and Geopolitical Boundaries

NATURE, BORDERS AND CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS

BORDERS, BIOTIC CORRIDORS AND ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPES

ENVIRONMENT AT BORDERS AND IN BORDER REGIONS

POLITICAL BORDERS, BORDER HIERARCHIES AND THE BORDERS OF ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

CROSS- AND TRANSBORDER ECOLOGIES

CONCLUSION: EPISTEMOLOGICAL ECOTONES, BOUNDARY ENTANGLEMENTS AND EDGE EFFECTS

PART IV: Displacement, Emplacement and Mobility

CHAPTER 22 Borders and the Rhythms of Displacement, Emplacement and Mobility

BORDERS, DISPLACEMENT AND EMPLACEMENT: RECONCEPTUALIZING MOBILITY

DISPLACEMENT AND EMPLACEMENT: NEW PERSPECTIVES

BORDERS, PLACE-MAKING AND THE BOUNDARIES OF HOME

NEW DIRECTIONS: BORDERS, MIGRATIONS AND TEMPORALITIES

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 23 Remapping Borders

THE ART OF MAPPING BORDERS

CECI N’EST PAS UNE FRONTIÈRE

THE RHYTHM OF BORDERINGS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 24 From Border Policing to Internal Immigration Control in the United States

BORDER WARS AND INTERNAL PACIFICATION

NONBORDER ENFORCEMENT, PART 1: (EXTRA)LEGAL DRAGNETS

NONBORDER ENFORCEMENT, PART 2: DEPUTIZATION

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 25 Labor Migration, Trafficking and Border Controls

LABOR MIGRATION, PEOPLE SMUGGLING AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN THE RIAU ISLANDS

USING THE ANTITRAFFICKING FRAMEWORK TO DEAL WITH LABOR MIGRATION

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 26 Spatial Strategies for Rebordering Human Migration at Sea

SPATIAL STRATEGIES EMPLOYED TO “REBORDER THE SEA”

THE GEOGRAPHICAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN SMUGGLING AND ENFORCEMENT

UNITED STATES INTERDICTION AT SEA: FROM THE CARIBBEAN TO THE NORTH PACIFIC

THE AUSTRALIAN SOLUTIONS IN THE PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEANS

REDRAWING THE LINES AROUND THE EUROPEAN UNION

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 27 “B/ordering” and Biopolitics in Central Asia

BOUNDARY BIOGRAPHIES

A BIOGRAPHY OF THE UZBEKISTAN–KYRGYZSTAN BOUNDARY

JUNE 2010 TRAGEDY AND ITS AFTERMATH

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 28 Border, Scene and Obscene

SOCIETY OF THE SPECTACLE AND THE SPECTACULAR STATE

THE BORDER SPECTACLE, THE NATIONAL FRONT(S) AND RACIAL ABJECTION

CITIZENSHIP, SCENE AND OBSCENE

PART V: Space, Performance and Practice

CHAPTER 29 Border Show Business and Performing States

CHAPTER 30 Performativity and the Eventfulness of Bordering Practices

PERFORMATIVITY, EVENTS, BORDERS

ESTONIA’S BRONZE NIGHT

THE PROBLEM OF INTEGRATION

THE PROBLEM OF STATELESSNESS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 31 Reconceptualizing the Space of the Mexico–US Borderline

CONDITIONED AND EMERGING RENDITIONS OF THE MEXICO–US BORDER

BORDERS AND THE NATION-STATE

BORDERS AND BRIDGES

THE ETHNOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE

THE RECURRENT THEMES OF THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE BORDERLANDS

CHAPTER 32 Border Towns and Cities in Comparative Perspective

WHAT ARE BORDER TOWNS?

NORTH AMERICAN BORDER TOWNS: TACTICS OF EXCLUSION AND REALITIES OF INTEGRATION

EUROPEAN BORDER TOWNS: TRANSCENDING DIVISIONS

AFRICAN BORDER TOWNS: THE CENTRALITY OF THE MARGINS

CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 33 A Sense of Border

DYNAMIC AND NONDYNAMIC BORDERING PRACTICES

HISTORIES OF THE CLASSIFICATORY LOGIC OF BORDERNESS

BORDER ONTOLOGIES

MULTIPLICITY AND CHAOS

POST-WESTPHALIAN BORDERNESS

TIDEMARKS, INDEXICALITY AND RELATIONAL LOCATIONS

Index

The Blackwell Companions to Anthropology offers a series of comprehensive syntheses of the traditional subdisciplines, primary subjects, and geographic areas of inquiry for the field. Taken together, the series represents both a contemporary survey of anthropology and a cutting edge guide to the emerging research and intellectual trends in the field as a whole.

1. A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology, edited by Alessandro Duranti

2. A Companion to the Anthropology of Politics, edited by David Nugent and Joan Vincent

3. A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians, edited by Thomas Biolsi

4. A Companion to Psychological Anthropology, edited by Conerly Casey and Robert B. Edgerton

5. A Companion to the Anthropology of Japan, edited by Jennifer Robertson

6. A Companion to Latin American Anthropology, edited by Deborah Poole

7. A Companion to Biological Anthropology, edited by Clark Larsen (hardback only)

8. A Companion to the Anthropology of India, edited by Isabelle Clark-Decès

9. A Companion to Medical Anthropology, edited by Merrill Singer and Pamela I. Erickson

10. A Companion to Cognitive Anthropology, edited by David B, Kronenfeld, Giovanni Bennardo, Victor de Munck, and Michael D. Fischer

11. A Companion to Cultural Resource Management, edited by Thomas King

12. A Companion to the Anthropology of Education, edited by Bradley A.U. Levinson and Mica Pollack

13. A Companion to the Anthropology of the Body and Embodiment, edited by Frances E. Mascia-Lees

14. A Companion to Paleopathology, edited by Anne L. Grauer

15. A Companion to Folklore, edited by Regina F. Bendix and Galit Hasan-Rokem

16. A Companion to Forensic Anthropology, edited by Dennis Dirkmaat

17. A Companion to the Anthropology of Europe, edited by Ullrich Kockel, Máiréad Nic Craith, and Jonas Frykman

18. A Companion to Rock Art, edited by Jo McDonald and Peter Veth

19. A Companion to Border Studies, edited by Thomas M. Wilson and Hastings Donnan

Forthcoming

A Companion to Moral Anthropology, edited by Didier Fassin

A Companion to Paleoanthropology, edited by David Begun

A Companion to Chinese Archaeology, edited by Anne Underhill

Title page

Figures and Table

FIGURES

10.1    The Northwest Territory circa 1790

10.2    Oregon Country, Columbia District, 1818–1846

11.1    Border zones of the Southern Cone

19.1    Badakhshan border crossings

23.1    The migrant routes into the US

23.2    The migrant routes into the EU

23.3    Ceci n’est pas une frontière

23.4    Rhizome

25.1    The Riau Islands

27.1    The Ferghana Valley in its regional context

27.2    The Ferghana Valley

TABLE

5.1    Categories of bordering

Notes on Contributors

Robert R. Alvarez, Jr is Professor of Ethnic Studies and the Director of the Center for Global California Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His research has focused on immigrant communities on the United States–Mexico border and global agriculture, especially transnational markets, entrepreneurs and the ethnic fruit trade. He has conducted research throughout Mexico, Panama and along the US–Mexico border, and participated in applied research and education in the US southwest, California, Micronesia, Hawaii, Belau and the Northern Marianas.

James Anderson is Professor Emeritus of Political Geography and Visiting Senior Research Fellow in Sociology in Queen’s University Belfast. He is currently employed on an Economic and Social Research Council (UK) funded project, 2007–2012, on Conflict in Cities and the Contested State: Belfast, Jerusalem and Other Divided Cities (www.conflictincities.org) of which he is a grant-holder along with colleagues in Cambridge, Exeter and Queen’s, having shared previous ESRC grants for work on Jerusalem with Exeter and Cambridge in 2003–2004 and 2005–2007. Recent and current research interests in political and urban geography include nationalism and national conflicts, territoriality and borders, state–city relations, political violence, European integration and transnational democracy. He is a founder member and co-director of Queen’s University’s Centre for International Borders Research (www.qub.ac.uk/cibr).

Anthony Ijaola Asiwaju is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Lagos. He has published widely in the area of comparative African borderland studies, including Western Yorubaland under European Rule, 1889–1945: A Comparative Analysis of French and British Colonialism (1976); Partitioned Africans: Ethnic Relations across Africa’s International Boundaries, 1884–1984 (1985); Boundaries and African Integration: Essays in Comparative History and Policy Analysis (2003); African Boundaries: Barriers, Conduits and Opportunities (with Paul Nugent, 1996). He has also been the pioneer Commissioner (International Boundaries) of Nigeria’s National Boundary Commission and a foundation member of the African Union Border Programme Steering Committee.

Pamela Ballinger is Fred Cuny Professor of International Human Rights and Associate Professor of History at the University of Michigan. She is the author of History in Exile (2003). Her research focuses on refugees, displacement, repatriation and memory, and has appeared in journals such as Comparative Studies in Society and History, Current Anthropology, History and Memory, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, and Past and Present.

John Borneman is Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. He has done ethnographic fieldwork in Germany, Central Europe, Lebanon, and Syria, and been guest professor in Sweden, Norway, France, Germany, and Syria. He served on the executive board of the Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften in Vienna, and currently sits on the boards of the Max Planck Institut-Halle and the Forum Psychoanalytischer Wissenschaften of the Berliner Institut für Psychotherapie und Psychoanalyse. His publications include Belonging in the Two Berlins: Kin, State, Nation (1992), Syrian Episodes: Sons, Fathers, and an Anthropologist in Aleppo (2007), Being There: The Fieldwork Encounter and the Making of Truth (as co-editor, 2009), and Political Crime and the Memory of Loss (2011).

Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly is Associate Professor of Public Administration at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, where he is also Jean Monnet Chair in European Urban and Border Region Policy and Director of the European Union Centre for Excellence. He is also co-director of the Local Government Institute and the editor of the Journal of Borderlands Studies. He is the author of many articles, chapters and books in urban and border studies.

Brenda Chalfin is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Florida in Gainesville. She has conducted ethnographic research on neoliberal reform and state transformation in Ghana with a focus on border zones, with funding from the National Science Foundation and Wenner-Gren Foundation. These themes are the subject of her book Neoliberal Frontiers: An Ethnography of Sovereignty in West Africa (2010). She continues to research global transformations in border controls and security protocols within the late modern state in both Africa and Europe. With the support of a Fulbright Hays grant she is working on a comparative study of African portscapes as zones of special sovereignty emerging out of the uneven effects of global integration. She has been a member of the School of Social Science at the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton, and was awarded a 2005–2006 Fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC.

Mathew Coleman is Assistant Professor in Geography at the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. He is a political geographer with a broad theoretical background in critical geopolitics, law and geography, immigration law and political economy. His current research funded by the National Science Foundation focuses on racial profiling and interior immigration enforcement in the US South. He has published widely in leading scholarly journals, including the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Antipode, Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Geopolitics and Political Geography.

David B. Coplan is the Professor and Chair in Social Anthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. He has been researching and writing about South African performing arts and media since 1976. He is the author of numerous publications in this field, including most notably In Township Tonight! South Africa’s Black City Music and Theatre (1986), revised, enlarged and published in a second edition in 2007. Professor Coplan is also a specialist in the ethnographic history and performance culture of the Basotho of southern Africa. His related works include In the Time of Cannibals: The Word Music of South Africa’s Basotho Migrants (1994) and the film Songs of the Adventurers (1986). His forthcoming social history of the Lesotho–South Africa border is entitled Major Warden’s Knife: Narrating Race and Place in a South African Borderland. David Coplan appears frequently on South African radio and television as an arts, culture, and media commentator.

Hilary Cunningham is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and has published widely on borders and the environment. She is currently working on what she calls “gated ecologies” in northern Ontario. Adopting a unique interdisciplinary framework that builds on anthropological insights into culture, power and history, she explores “nature” as entailing boundary-making; that is, as involving metaphysical, aesthetic and political practices that enact and enable particular human–nature interactions.

Nicholas De Genova has taught anthropology, migration studies, and ethnic studies at Columbia and Stanford Universities (USA) and the University of Bern (Switzerland), and has also held research positions at the University of Warwick (UK), the University of Amsterdam (Netherlands), and the University of Chicago (USA). He is the author of Working the Boundaries: Race, Space, and “Illegality” in Mexican Chicago (2005), co-author of Latino Crossings: Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and the Politics of Race and Citizenship (2003), editor of Racial Transformations: Latinos and Asians Remaking the United States (2006), and co-editor of The Deportation Regime: Sovereignty, Space, and the Freedom of Movement (2010). He is completing a new book, titled The Spectacle of Terror: Immigration, Race, and the Homeland Security State.

Hastings Donnan is Professor of Anthropology at Queen’s University Belfast. He is the author, editor or co-editor of nearly 20 books, including, most recently, The Anthropology of Sex (with Fiona Magowan, 2010), Borderlands: Ethnographic Approaches to Security, Power and Identity (with Thomas M. Wilson, 2010) and Borders: Frontiers of Identity, Nation and State (with Thomas M. Wilson, 1999, 2001). He is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and a Founding Academician of the UK’s Academy of Social Sciences.

Michele Ford is Associate Professor in the Department of Indonesian Studies at the University of Sydney, where she teaches about social activism and human rights in Southeast Asia. Her research focuses on the Indonesian labor movement, organized labor’s responses to temporary labor migration in East and Southeast Asia, and the Singapore–Indonesia borderlands. She is the author of Workers and Intellectuals: NGOs, Trade Unions and the Indonesian Labour Movement (2009) and the co-editor of Women and Work in Indonesia (2008); Women and Labour Organizing in Asia: Diversity, Autonomy and Activism (2008) and Indonesia beyond the Water’s Edge: Managing an Archipelagic State (2009).

Jonathan Goodhand is Reader in the Department of Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. Before taking up this position he managed humanitarian and development programs in conflict situations in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and has extensive experience as a researcher and advisor in South and Central Asia for a range of nongovernmental organizations and aid agencies. His research interests include the political economy of aid and conflict, NGOs and peace-building and “postconflict” reconstruction. He is author or co-author of Aid, Conflict and Peacebuilding in Sri Lanka: Caught in the Peace Trap (forthcoming), Aiding Peace: The Role of NGOs in Armed Conflict (2006) and War Economies in a Regional Context: Challenges for Transformation.

Sarah Green is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester. Throughout her career, she has been interested in anthropological understandings of space, place and location, both within cities and in wider terms, such as the virtual spaces of the internet. Her interest in how location becomes involved in people’s lives culminated in an enduring interest in borders. She has done fieldwork on the Greek-Albanian border and, more recently, in the Aegean, along and across the border area between Greece and Turkey. She is author of Notes from the Balkans (2005) and Urban Amazons (1997).

Alejandro Grimson received his PhD in anthropology from the University of Brasilia. His principal research interests are in migratory processes, border areas, social movements and political cultures. Among his principal publications are On Argentina and the Southern Cone (with Gabriel Kessler, 2005), La nación en sus límites (2003) and Los límites de la cultura (2011). He is currently a researcher at CONICET, the National Scientific and Technical Research Council of Argentina, and is Dean of the Institute of Social Studies of National University of San Martín in Argentina.

Josiah McC. Heyman is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Texas, El Paso. Among his publications are States and Illegal Practices (1999), Finding a Moral Heart for US Immigration Policy: An Anthropological Perspective (1998) and Life and Labor on the Border: Working People of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico 1886–1986 (1991). His research interests include migration and border control; states, bureaucracies and power; and engaged social science.

Nancy Hiemstra is a faculty Scholar in Residence at Emerson College’s Institute of Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies. Her research interests focus on human mobility, migration policy-making and the role of the state in shaping daily life. Previous research examined Latino immigration to small-town Colorado. Current research focuses on impacts in Ecuador of international migration, migrant detention and deportation policies and practices in the US and the embodied consequences of immigration enforcement policies in countries of migrant origin. She has published articles in Antipode, Geopolitics and Social and Cultural Geography.

Robert J. Kaiser is Professor of Geography at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. His research explores the always politicized socio-spatial processes of place-making, identification and differentiation. Recently, his work has turned to developing an event ontology in human geography, primarily using Deleuze’s philosophy of the event. He has long-standing interests in the political and cultural geographies of the USSR and postsocialist space.

Olivier Thomas Kramsch is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Human Geography, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, and a member of the Nijmegen Centre for Border Research (NCBR). He has written extensively on various dimensions of European transboundary regionalism, drawing on theories of cosmopolitanism, postcoloniality and nineteenth-century French anarchism, while eschewing, wherever possible, the word “scale.” He believes it is possible, one day, to link the literatures on internal and external European Union borders within a single, coherent and convincing analytic frame.

Lenore Lyons is Research Professor in Asian Studies at the University of Western Australia. Recognized as the leading scholar on the feminist movement in Singapore, her book A State of Ambivalence: The Feminist Movement in Singapore was published in 2004. She recently completed a major study of citizenship, identity and sovereignty in the Riau Islands borderlands of Indonesia (with Michele Ford) and is currently working on a project that examines labor migration and human trafficking in Singapore, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Cathal McCall is Senior Lecturer in European Studies, School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy, Queen’s University, Belfast. He has published widely on the theme of cross-border cooperation and conflict transformation in the Irish border region. His book Europeanisation and Hibernicisation: Ireland and Europe (co-edited with Thomas M. Wilson) was published by Rodopi Press in 2010.

Allan K. McDougall is Professor Emeritus in Political Science at the University of Western Ontario and Adjunct Research Professor at the University of Alberta. His recent research addresses hegemonic transformation in regions of contested jurisdiction as state systems were imposed.

Nick Megoran is a political geographer and lecturer at Newcastle University. His main research interests are nationalism in Central Asia, Christianity in recent US-UK foreign policy contexts, classical and critical geopolitical theory, peace and nonviolence, and international boundaries. He has been fascinated by international boundaries since childhood.

Alison Mountz is Associate Professor of Geography at Syracuse University where she teaches courses on migration, and political, feminist and urban geography. Her work explores struggles over border enforcement, asylum and detention. Mountz is the author of Seeking Asylum: Human Smuggling and Bureaucracy at the Border, which was awarded the 2011 Meridian Book Prize from the Association of American Geographers. She is now conducting research on detention facilities located on islands off the shores of North America, Australia and the European Union.

David Newman is Professor of Political Geography in the Department of Politics and Government at Ben Gurion University in Israel where he currently serves as Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. His work focuses on the territorial dimensions of ethnic conflict and he has written extensively on issues related to borders and their significance in the contemporary world, and more specifically on border and territorial issues in Israel-Palestine. He is the editor of the international journal Geopolitics.

Paul Nugent is Professor of Comparative African History and Director of the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh as well as President of the Centre’s European African Studies Association, AEGIS. He is also Chairman of the European Science Foundation-funded African Borderlands Research Network (ABORNE). He is the author of Africa since Independence: A Comparative History (2004, 2012) and of Smugglers, Secessionists and Loyal Citizens of the Ghana–Togo Frontier: The Lie of the Borderlands since 1914 (2003). He is currently completing a monograph entitled Boundaries, Communities and State-Making in the Senegambia and the Trans-Volta: The Centrality of the Margins, c. 1750 to the Present.

Liam O’Dowd is Professor of Sociology at Queen’s University Belfast and Director of the Centre for International Borders Research. His research has focused on state borders and border regions in the European Union and more recently on divided cities and the contested state. His recent publications include Crossing the Border: New Relationships between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland (2007), New Borders for a New Europe (2003) and “From a ‘Borderless World’ to a ‘World of Borders’: ‘Bringing History Back In,’” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space (2010).

Brendan O’Leary is Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include How To Get Out of Iraq with Integrity (2009), Power-Sharing in Deeply Divided Places (in press) and Understanding Northern Ireland: Colonialism, Control, Consociation (forthcoming). His research interests include ethnic conflict, political violence and power-sharing in deeply divided places. He has served as the Senior Advisor on Power-Sharing to the Mediation Support Unit of the United Nations.

Mathijs Pelkmans is Lecturer in Anthropology at the London School of Economics. He holds a PhD from the University of Amsterdam and worked as a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology from 2003 to 2006. He is the author of Defending the Border: Identity, Religion, and Modernity in the Republic of Georgia (2006) and editor of Conversion after Socialism: Disruptions, Modernisms, and Technologies of Faith in the Former Soviet Union (2009).

Lisa Philips is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Alberta. Her research has focused on First Nations and state relations, both contemporary and historical. With Allan McDougall, she explores hegemonic processes, especially through the construction and reconstruction of political, legal and social identities.

Dan Rabinowitz is Professor of Anthropology at Tel-Aviv University and at Central European University and has held visiting professorships at the universities of Princeton, New York and Toronto. He is has published with many of the major university presses and in leading journals such as American Ethnologist, Critical Inquiry, Man (Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute), International Journal of Middle East Studies, Journal of Anthropological Research, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Identities, Annual Review of Anthropology, Environmental Justice and more. He is a regular contributor to the op-ed page of Haaretz, Chair of the Israeli Association for Environmental Justice and Vice Chair of Greenpeace UK.

Timothy Raeymaekers is a lecturer in political geography at the University of Zurich. His research interests are in legal pluralism, economic anthropology, migration and borderlands. He currently works in Central Africa and Europe.

James Wesley Scott is Professor of Regional and Border Studies, Karelian Institute at the University of Eastern Finland and an Associate Professor of Geography at the Free University of Berlin. His principal fields of research include urban and regional development, border regions, regional and urban governance, metropolitan area problems, and European and North American geography. He currently coordinates the EUBORDERREGIONS project, financed by the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development.

Alan Smart is Professor at the Department of Anthropology, University of Calgary. His research has focused on urban issues, housing, foreign investment, social change, food safety, zoonotic diseases, and agriculture in Hong Kong, China and Canada. He is author of Making Room: Squatter Clearance in Hong Kong (1992) and The Shek Kip Mei Myth: Squatters, Fires and Colonial Rule in Hong Kong, 1950–1963 (2006), and co-editor (with Josephine Smart) of Petty Capitalists and Globalization (2005).

Josephine Smart is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Calgary, where she received a Distinguished Research Award in 2006 and a Distinguished Teacher Award in 2000. Her research and teaching interests are economic anthropology, food biosecurity and emergent infectious diseases, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and social-economic impact in Canada, social and economic development in post-1978 China, Chinese international migration, globalization, immigrant entrepreneurs, and the international mobility of capital and labor. Author of The Political Economy of Street Hawkers in Hong Kong (1989), she is also co-editor of Petty Capitalists and Globalization: Flexibility, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (2005) and Plural Globalities in Multiple Localities: New World Borders (2001). Her current research project, a comparative study of the political economy of farming policies in Canada and China, is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (2009–2012).

Henk van Houtum is Associate Professor of Geopolitics and Political Geography and Head of the Nijmegen Centre for Border Research, Radboud University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands and Research Professor of Geopolitics at the University of Bergamo in Italy. He has written extensively on the ontology and (im)morality of borders and b/ordering, immigration regimes, (national) identity, regional and urban politics and cartography. He is editor of the Journal of Borderlands Studies.

Thomas M. Wilson is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Department of Anthropology in Binghamton University, State University of New York. Currently an Honorary Professor in the School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work in Queen’s University Belfast, he is also a founder member and co-director of that university’s Centre for International Borders Research. From 2008 to 2010 he was President of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe.