001

Table of Contents
 
Title Page
Copyright Page
Dedication
PREFACE
Foreword
THE AUTHORS
 
PART ONE - FOUNDATIONS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
INTRODUCTION
 
CHAPTER ONE - Historical Foundations of Academic Advising
 
ERAS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
DEVELOPMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL TYPES
LOOKING TO THE FUTURE
 
CHAPTER TWO - Theoretical Foundations of Academic Advising
 
THE ROLE OF THEORY IN ACADEMIC ADVISING
TRADITIONAL NORMATIVE APPROACHES TO ACADEMIC ADVISING
PARADIGM EXPANSION: NORMATIVE THEORIES
PARADIGM EXPANSION: ANALOGICAL THEORIES
FUTURE THEORETICAL TRADITIONS IN ACADEMIC ADVISING
 
CHAPTER THREE - Ethical Foundations of Academic Advising
 
WHAT IS ETHICS?
ETHICS AND RELATED STUDIES
KEY ETHICAL IDEALS
ETHICAL PRINCIPLES FOR ADVISING
ETHICAL PRINCIPLES AND ETHICAL DILEMMAS
CODES OF ETHICS AND CORE VALUES
 
CHAPTER FOUR - Legal Foundations of Academic Advising
 
WHAT LAWS AND COURT DECISIONS APPLY?
LEGAL DOCTRINES AND THEORIES
THE FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT
FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND EMPLOYMENT
CIVIL RIGHTS LAW
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER FIVE - Advising for Student Success
 
WHAT ADVISORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT STUDENT SUCCESS IN COLLEGE
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER SIX - Advising as Teaching and Learning
 
THE ADVISING SYLLABUS
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER SEVEN - Advising for Career and Life Planning
 
CAREER ADVISING VERSUS CAREER COUNSELING
CAREER-DEVELOPMENT THEORY AND PRACTICE
SUCCESS FACTORS
CONCLUSION
APPENDIX
 
PART TWO - STUDENT DIVERSITY AND STUDENT NEEDS
 
CHAPTER EIGHT - The Changing College Student
 
CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS
CHANGING CHARACTERISTICS
TECHNOLOGY AND TODAY’S STUDENTS
IMPLICATIONS FOR ADVISORS
 
CHAPTER NINE - Moving into College
 
THE NEW STUDENT EXPERIENCE
TRANSITION AND ESTABLISHMENT
TODAY’S STUDENTS
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER TEN - Moving through College
 
TYPES OF TRANSITIONS
THE ADVISING-COUNSELING CONTINUUM OF RESPONSIBILITIES
ADVISING UNDECIDED AND INDECISIVE STUDENTS
ADVISING MAJOR-CHANGING STUDENTS
UNDERPREPARED STUDENTS
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER ELEVEN - Moving on from College
 
POSTCOLLEGE OPTIONS
SEVEN-STEP SELF-AUTHORED MOVING ON MODEL
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER TWELVE - Students with Specific Advising Needs
 
COALITION-BUILDING
STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER THIRTEEN - Advising Students of Color and International Students
 
ADVISING STUDENTS OF COLOR
UNDERSTANDING CULTURAL CONTEXTS OF STUDENTS OF COLOR
ADVISORS’ ROLE IN AFFIRMING DIVERSITY AND TRANSFORMING INSTITUTIONS
SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADVISORS
ADVISING INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
ADVISING PERCEPTIONS OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN TERMS OF THEIR IMMIGRATION STATUS
STRATEGIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADVISORS WORKING WITH INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
CONCLUSION
 
PART THREE - ORGANIZATION AND DELIVERY OF ADVISING SERVICES
CHAPTER FOURTEEN - Vision, Mission, Goals, and Program Objectives for Academic ...
 
SETTING THE STAGE: PLANNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
DEFINING AND DESIGNING STATEMENTS OF VISION, MISSION, GOALS, AND PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER FIFTEEN - Organization of Academic Advising Services
 
FACTORS INFLUENCING THE ORGANIZATION OF ADVISING
ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
TRENDS IN ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS
KEY COMPONENTS OF EFFECTIVE ADVISING PROGRAMS
ADVISING AND OTHER CAMPUS SERVICES AND OFFICES
 
CHAPTER SIXTEEN - Advising Delivery: Faculty Advising
 
THREE STEPS TOWARD REALIZING THE POTENTIAL OF FACULTY ADVISING
IMPLICATIONS
 
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN - Advising Delivery: Professional Advisors, Counselors, and ...
 
PROFESSIONAL ACADEMIC ADVISORS
PROFESSIONAL COUNSELORS
GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISORS
PEER UNDERGRADUATE ADVISORS
ADVISING SUPPORT STAFF
ADVISING FUNCTIONS IN NONADVISING OFFICES
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN - Advising Delivery: Group Strategies
 
CHARACTERISTICS OF SUCCESSFUL GROUP ADVISORS
REASONS FOR USING GROUP ADVISING
FORMATS FOR DELIVERING GROUP ADVISING
GROUP ADVISING FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS
KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL GROUP ADVISING
ASSESSMENT OF GROUP ADVISING
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER NINETEEN - Advising Delivery: Using Technology
 
OVERVIEW OF TECHNOLOGY IN ADVISING: A DIFFERENT KIND OF DIGITAL DIVIDE
USES OF TECHNOLOGY THAT SUPPORTS ADVISING SYSTEMS
DEGREE AUDIT PROGRAMS
TRANSFER ARTICULATION SYSTEMS
CAREER GUIDANCE PROGRAMS
WEBINARS
USES OF TECHNOLOGY THAT SUPPORT THE DELIVERY OF ADVISING
FUTURE TRENDS
CONCLUSION
 
PART FOUR - TRAINING, ASSESSMENT, RECOGNITION, AND REWARD
INTRODUCTION
 
CHAPTER TWENTY - Critical Concepts in Advisor Training and Development
 
THE STATUS OF ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT IN U.S. HIGHER EDUCATION
FACTORS IN PLANNING ADVISOR-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
CONCEPTUAL ISSUES IN ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT
RELATIONAL ISSUES IN ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT
INFORMATIONAL ISSUES IN ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT
DESIGNING PROGRAMS TO MEET ADVISOR NEEDS
FORMATS FOR ADVISOR-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
IMPLEMENTING ADVISOR-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE - Tools and Resources for Advisors
 
ADVISING TOOLBOXES: THE BASICS
CONCEPTUAL COMPONENT: THE BROAD PERSPECTIVE
CONCEPTUAL COMPONENT: THE CAMPUS PERSPECTIVE
CONCEPTUAL COMPONENT: ADVISOR PERSPECTIVE
TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR TRAINING ON THE INFORMATIONAL COMPONENT
DEEPENING ADVISING KNOWLEDGE ABOUT STUDENTS
TRAINING RESOURCES AND TOOLS FOR ADVISING SESSIONS
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO - Delivering One-to-One Advising: Skills and Competencies
 
THE ADVISING RELATIONSHIP MATTERS
INFORMATIONAL, CONCEPTUAL, AND RELATIONAL ROLES
ADVISORS ALREADY KNOW WHAT TO DO
COMMUNICATION BASICS
THE FIVE C’S OF THE SKILLED ACADEMIC ADVISOR
ADVISING ... OR IS IT?
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE - Assessing Student Learning
 
A BRIEF HISTORICAL FRAMEWORK
IDENTIFYING LEARNING OUTCOMES
OPERATIONALIZING STUDENT LEARNING
MEASURING LEARNING
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR - Assessing Advisor Effectiveness
 
THE CASE FOR ATTENTION TO ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT
KEY INITIAL STEPS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN EFFECTIVE ADVISOR ASSESSMENT PROGRAM
FOUNDATIONAL PRINCIPLES OF EFFECTIVE ASSESSMENT
STUDENT ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC ADVISORS
PREASSESSMENT AND POSTASSESSMENT METHODS
QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT METHODS
ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS’ BEHAVIORAL RECORDS
ADVISOR SELF-ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC ADVISORS BY THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR
CLOSING THE LOOP: USING THE RESULTS TO IMPROVE ADVISING
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE - Assessing the Effectiveness of the Advising Program
 
CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF AN ADVISING PROGRAM
CREATING (OR REFINING) AN ASSESSMENT PLAN AT THE PROGRAM LEVEL
CONCLUSIONS
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX - Recognition and Reward for Academic Advising in Theory and ...
 
SIX REWARD PRINCIPLES
SURVEY OF RECOGNITIONS AND REWARDS FOR ACADEMIC ADVISING
 
PART FIVE - PERSPECTIVES ON ADVISING
INTRODUCTION
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN - Campus Administrator Perspectives on Advising
 
PRESIDENT
CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER—FOUR-YEAR PUBLIC
CHIEF STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICER—TWO-YEAR PUBLIC
CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER—FOUR-YEAR PRIVATE
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT - Advising Administrator Perspectives on Advising
 
FOUR-YEAR PUBLIC
TWO YEAR COLLEGES
CONCLUSION
 
CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE - Perspectives on the Future of Academic Advising
 
CHALLENGES TO HIGHER EDUCATION
ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGES
 
PART SIX - EXEMPLARY PRACTICES IN ACADEMIC ADVISING
EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS
PART SIX SUMMARY
 
APPENDIX A - NATIONAL ACADEMIC ADVISING ASSOCIATION
APPENDIX A - CONCEPT OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
APPENDIX B - THE STATEMENT OF CORE VALUESOF ACADEMIC ADVISING
APPENDIX C - Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education ...
NAME INDEX
SUBJECT INDEX

001

First, we dedicate this book to all the academic advisors who have committed their professional lives to students and have contributed more than they know to the realization of innumerable goals and dreams. In addition, we recognize individuals too numerous to mention who, for more than three decades, have advanced the field of academic advising through research, publications, presentations, and untiring advocacy and affirmation.
 
VNG/WRH/TJG—2/15/08

PREFACE
The students who are matriculating in our colleges and universities today are the last of the thirteenth generation of Americans (born 1977 to 1997) to attend college since the first students entered the colonial colleges when the nation was born. Yale, Brown, and other early colleges were cognizant of their students’ academic and personal concerns, and academic advising became the natural process for attending to those individual students’ needs. Since then, academic advising has continued to play an important role in the lives of students. True, it has experienced many cycles of reemphasis and renewal, and the advising process itself has been defined and redefined in many forms, but its acceptance as an integral part of higher education has never been stronger than it is today.
As the size of institutions increased over the years to accommodate growing numbers of students and as curricula proliferated and became more complex, advising took on new and sometimes expanded responsibilities. Community colleges have played a predominant role in advising’s latest rebirth because they are the portal of entry for many new students, such as older adults, minority students, part-time students, and those with limited financial resources.
In the late 1960s and 1970s, students were demanding more personalized attention in their academic planning. It is no accident that this was when Crookston’s (1972) and O’Banion’s (1972) models for a more humane and developmental approach to advising students appeared. Later, many institutions began to realize the importance of advising in the retention of students, especially during their initial enrollment. This brought about a major examination of how advising was delivered on some campuses, and as a result, reorganization took place at many institutions. The advising center was introduced on some campuses as a vehicle for offering a more visible and centralized location that students could use in place of or in addition to their regular faculty advising system.
The advent of technology has had a profound effect on how advisors interact with students and how administrative advising tasks function. Many advisors believe that technology will continue to revolutionize advising, teaching, and learning. Rather than depersonalize contact between advisor and student, it is hoped that technology will encourage more meaningful and frequent contact.
In this new, exciting milieu, it seems appropriate to once again update and document the current status of academic advising in a detailed way. The need to learn from its past and project its role into the future has never been stronger. The second edition of Academic Advising: A Comprehensive Handbook has been updated to accomplish just that. As in the first edition, this volume is intended to be a handy reference for professional advisors—those who spend their day working with students who have a variety of academic, vocational, and personal needs. Faculty advisors will find much helpful information about students, resources, and advising techniques in these pages. Administrators can review the many approaches to advising that are described and perhaps find new ways of thinking about how their delivery system might become more student-responsive. The many elements of the advising process described in this book can open new vistas for everyone involved in the advising enterprise.
It is obvious that academic advising is not an isolated function but an integral part of the mission of higher education. This book will help those involved in advising either directly or indirectly and at every level not only to appreciate the importance for good advising in students’ lives but also to understand how it can contribute to the purpose of higher education. This handbook contains five sections representing important facets of academic advising, and the chapters in each part are authored by experts who are well equipped to share their expertise. The sixth section contains descriptions of current advising programs that demonstrate how some of the ideas and concepts presented by the authors can be put into advising practice.
The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of Marsha Miller, Assistant Director, Resources and Services, NACADA’s publications liaison, for her outstanding work in coordinating the various collection stages of the manuscript. We would also like to thank the many NACADA members who acted as Section reviewers. Their suggestions have greatly improved the quality of the book’s content.
 
Virginia N. Gordon
The Ohio State University
Wesley R. Habley
ACT, Inc.
Thomas J. Grites
Richard Stockton College, New Jersey
August 2008

FOREWORD
As Executive Director of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA), let me be the first to congratulate you on your very wise decision to pick up this book. Short of saying it will change your life, I can honestly say it has the potential to change your professional practice and dramatically change the lives of the students on your campus. The editors and authors have truly created the pivotal resource for academic advising and student success in higher education.
As you read this Second Edition of the Academic Advising: A Comprehensive Handbook, you will find a foundation of theory and research that grounds what you do on a daily basis with your students. The strategies and practices you learn from this book will help you to have a more positive impact on the success of your students.
NACADA is pleased to publish this text in partnership with Jossey-Bass. Just as NACADA’s Concept of Academic Advising defines academic advising as “integral to fulfilling the teaching and learning mission of higher education,” NACADA is integral to higher education’s goal of providing the highest-quality academic advising and student success initiatives. NACADA, with nearly 11,000 members internationally, is the leader within the global education community for the theory, delivery, application, and advancement of academic advising that enhances student learning and development. For thirty years, NACADA has been recognized for providing quality programming, publications, and networking opportunities that support the work of professional advisors, faculty, administrators, and graduate students who create the academic advising experiences that support student learning and success.
As you read, you will derive the most from this text by using the following questions as your guide:
• What are the key concepts that will make me a better advisor?
• What are the key concepts that will enhance the academic advising experiences of my students?
• How can I use the strategies I have learned to impact our advising program?
• What have I learned that I can use in working with my colleagues and administrators on my campus to affect change in our advising program?
• What have I learned that triggers my own thoughts for research and publication within the field?
The answers to these questions will ensure that this text will become for you what was intended by the editors and authors—a living and working resource that you will repeatedly use to change your professional life and your students’ lives for many years to come!
 
Charlie L. Nutt
Executive Director
National Academic Advising Association

THE AUTHORS
Susan Ames is director of first-year and transition programs at Le Moyne College and is a member of the College’s Academic Advisement Center, whose staff works closely with faculty and student affairs to assist new students in their transition to Le Moyne and also coordinates activities related to undergraduate academic advising, study abroad, academic support and tutoring, and disabilities support. Previously, as Le Moyne’s coordinator of academic initiatives, Ames was responsible for working with both academic affairs and student affairs in planning and implementing the College’s residential learning communities. Ames holds an M.S. in higher education administration from Syracuse University and a B.A. in English and magazine journalism from SU’s S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.
 
Drew C. Appleby received his B.A. in psychology from Simpson College in 1969 and his M.S. (1971) and Ph.D. (1972) in experimental psychology from Iowa State University. After teaching at Marian College for twenty-seven years—and chairing its Psychology Department for the last twenty-one of those years—he assumed the position of Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Psychology Department in 1999, where he is a tenured full professor in charge of advising, assessment, enrollment management, and community-building. He is the author of The Savvy Psychology Major, has over eighty professional publications, and has made over 400 presentations to a wide variety of professional and nonprofessional audiences. He was elected to Fellow status of Division Two of the American Psychological Association (The Society for the Teaching of Psychology [STP]) in 1992 and to Division One (The Society for General Psychology) in 2002. Appleby received STP’s Outstanding Psychology Teacher Award in a Four-Year College or University in 1993, Marian College’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 1993, IUPUI’s Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2003, and the IUPUI School of Science Teacher of the Year Award in 2007. He was also chosen by the American Psychological Association (APA) to present its G. Stanley Hall Teaching Lecture in 1998 and by Psi Chi (the national honor society in psychology) to present its Distinguished Lecture during the 2008 APA convention. Appleby was recognized for his advising skills by NACADA when he received the Outstanding Advisor Award of its Great Lakes Region in 1988, by the IUPUI School of Science when he received their Advisor of the Year Award in 2002, and by the IUPUI Psychology Department when he received their Advisor of the Year Award in 2002, 2003, and 2006. He was recognized for his mentoring skills by being the charter recipient of Marian’s Mentor of the Year Award in 1996, IUPUI’s Psychology Department’s Mentor of the Year in 2000, and IUPUI’s Alvin Bynum Mentor of the Year award in 2007. He created STP’s Project Syllabus, directs STP’s Mentoring Service, and has served as a consultant to other psychology departments.
 
Jennifer L. Bloom is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of the master’s degree program in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program housed in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policies at the University of South Carolina. Prior to her appointment at the University of South Carolina in August 2007, she served as the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Medical Scholars Program at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign. She earned her doctorate in Higher Education Administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1995.
Dr. Bloom was elected President of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) for the 2007-2008 term. She serves on the Board of Directors of NACADA (2005-2008) and previously chaired the Advising Graduate and Professional Students Commission and the Member Career Services Committee. She received the NACADA Outstanding Advising Administrator Award in 2005 and the University of Illinois’ Campus Academic Professional Excellence Award in 2007. Her research interests include appreciative advising, academic advising in general, career paths in higher education administration, leadership, and change management.
 
Thomas Brown served as an academic and student affairs educator for twenty-seven years, most recently as the Dean of Advising Services/Special Programs at Saint Mary’s College of California. Tom developed and administered Saint Mary’s nationally recognized faculty-based academic advising program. He was also responsible for new student and family orientation programs, Academic Support and Achievement (e.g., tutoring, services for students with disabilities), pre-law advising, and the Offices of Asian Pacific American, Black, Latino, and International Student Programs. Brown developed the College’s High Potential Program, which provides access and support to first-generation students from historically underrepresented backgrounds. When he left Saint Mary’s in 1998, the students and faculty instituted the Dean Thomas Brown Award, which is presented annually to an outstanding academic advisor.
Brown has held numerous leadership positions in the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) and served as Chair of the Pre-law Advisors National Council. For twenty years, he facilitated the plenary session on Advisor Development at the annual NACADA Summer Institutes on Academic Advising. He has earned awards and recognition for his leadership and service in the US and abroad.
Brown is Managing Principal of Thomas Brown & Associates, a consulting group that has served more than 300 colleges and universities related to assessment, program design and implementation, and faculty and staff development. He has published and presented extensively on academic advising, student retention, and promoting the achievement and success of multicultural and at-risk students.
 
James E. Bultman became the eleventh president of Hope College on July, 1, 1999. Dr. Bultman was previously president of Northwestern College in Orange City, Iowa, where he served with distinction from 1985 to 1999. Prior to assuming the presidency at Northwestern, Dr. Bultman was a faculty member at Hope College, chaired the department of education from 1976 to 1982, and was dean for the social sciences from 1982 to 1985. He was also Hope’s baseball coach from 1971 to 1985 and an assistant football coach from 1970 to 1984.
Dr. Bultman received his A.B. degree in chemistry from Hope College in 1963 and the M.A. and Ed.D. degrees in education from Western Michigan University in 1966 and 1971, respectively. He holds an honorary degree from Keiwa College, Shibata City, Japan (L.H.D.), and an honorary degree from Hope College (Litt.D.). In October 2001, he was awarded the “Distinguished Alumni Award” from Western Michigan University. A similar award was presented to Dr. Bultman from Hope College in 1995.
Dr. Bultman has been an active leader in higher education circles. He served as chair of the board of directors of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, was a member of the Council of Presidents of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), and was chair of the Iowa College Foundation, the Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, and the Commission on Campus Concerns for the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. Present memberships include the Michigan Colleges Foundation (MCF) Board Chair; Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) Board Vice Chair; Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Michigan (AICUM) Board Chair; Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) Board of Control; National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), where he serves on the President’s Advisory Council; National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU), where he serves on the Board of Directors and is Chair of the Student Financial Aid Committee; Annapolis Group; Holland Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors; Economic Club of Grand Rapids Board of Directors; Van Andel Institute Board of Governors; and the Holland Rotary Club. He also serves on the Board of Directors for The Bank of Holland.
 
Susan M. Campbell earned her undergraduate degree in speech and theatre from Ball State University, her M.S. in adult education from the University of Southern Maine, and her Ed.D. in higher education administration from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Since arriving at the University of Southern Maine in 1977, Dr. Campbell has held a number of administrative positions in student and academic affairs. She became the Director of Advising Services in 1993 and was promoted in 2001 to Executive Director of the Division of Advising and Academic Resources and in 2005 to Associate Vice-President for Academic Affairs. Dr. Campbell holds an adjunct appointment as associate professor in USM’s College of Education and Human Development and coordinates the student affairs concentration in the Masters in Adult Education program.
Dr. Campbell served as the 2006-2007 President of NACADA and has worked on committees at both the national and regional level. She is the recipient of the 2004 Service to NACADA Award and the 2005 Virginia N. Gordon Award for Excellence in Academic Advising. Dr. Campbell’s publications include coauthoring the NACADA Guide to Assessment in Academic Advising (2005), coediting the 2005 NACADA Monograph, Peer Advising: Intentional Connections to Support Student Learning, and being a contributing author to The Distance Learner’s Guide (1999 and 2004) published by Prentice-Hall. Dr. Campbell also participated in the 2005 American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) Graduation Rate Outcomes Study and served on the Engagement Task Force for the Voluntary System of Accountability Project sponsored by AASCU and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC).
 
Philip D. Christman has been at Malone University in Canton, Ohio, since 1985 and currently serves as a consultant in advising and testing. Prior to that, he was the Director of Advising and Testing (1990-2007) and Director of Admissions (1985-1990). During his twenty-eight years in higher education, he has worked in admissions, financial aid, records, and athletics, and has also been an adjunct faculty member. Some of his publications and research interests include Narrative Advising, the role of family in college persistence leading to graduation, Q Methodology, and Appreciative Advising. He earned is B.A. (1976) in psychology from Bloomsburg State University, and his M.Ed. (1997) and Ph.D. (2004) in community counseling from Kent State University in Ohio.
 
Evette Castillo Clark is the Executive Administrator for Initiatives and Divisional Planning at Tulane University. Her role entails strategic planning, new initiatives, assessment and research, and staff development for the Division of Student Affairs. She is adjunct faculty at Tulane University and teaches graduate students in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of New Orleans. She was formerly the Assistant Dean of Students at San Diego State University and adjunct faculty in the College of Education. Dr. Clark is a past National Co-Chair of the Asian and Pacific Islander Knowledge Community of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and Board Member of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA). Dr. Clark received her B.A. in sociology from the University of California, Irvine; her M.A. in student personnel administration in higher education from New York University; and completed her D.Ed. in the area of international and multicultural education at the University of San Francisco. Her areas of research concern college students of color, creating a pipeline of undergraduate students to careers in student affairs, and leadership in higher education.
 
Joe Cuseo holds a doctoral degree in educational psychology and assessment from the University of Iowa. Currently, he is a Professor of Psychology at Marymount College (California), where for twenty-five years he has directed the first-year seminar, a course required of all new students. He has been a member of the Advisory Board for the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, and has received the Center’s “outstanding first-year advocate award.” He is also a thirteen-time recipient of the “faculty member of the year award” on his home campus, a student-driven award based on effective teaching and academic advising. Joe has authored articles on the relationship between academic advisement and student retention, and on advising strategies for students who are undecided and “in transition” between majors, and has delivered conference presentations and keynote addresses on the power of advising for promoting student success. He has also authored numerous articles on the first-year experience, a textbook for first-year seminar, titled, Thriving in College and Beyond: Research-Based Strategies for Academic Success & Personal Development, and is currently completing a monograph on the first-year seminar, titled, The First-Year Seminar: Research-Based Guidelines for Course Design, Delivery, & Assessment.
 
Kathy Davis has been Director of the Academic Advisement Center at Missouri State University since 1993. Earlier in her career, she worked in residence life at Stephens College and directed new student orientation at Wichita State University. She was a member of the Board of Directors of the National Orientation Directors Association for five years, edited The Orientation Review, and hosted the National Orientation Directors Association national conference in 1992. She wrote a chapter for the 2003 National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) monograph: Advisor Training: Exemplary Practices in the Development of Advisor Skills. Davis was Commission Chair for the NACADA Advisor Training and Development Commission from 2005 to 2007. Davis was recognized as Missouri’s “Outstanding Advising Administrator” in 2003 and as a NACADA “Outstanding Advising Administrator” in 2004. She has enjoyed serving as an advisor training consultant and workshop leader on numerous campuses.
 
Jayne K. Drake, who earned her Ph.D. in English at Penn State, is an Associate Professor of English, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, and Director of the Master of Liberal Arts Program in the College of Liberal Arts at Temple University in Philadelphia. Dr. Drake is passionate about her students and has been publicly acknowledged for outstanding teaching, with awards including the College of Liberal Arts Excellence in Teaching Award and the 2008 Temple University Faculty Advisor of the Year Award. Her scholarly and publication interests are in pre-twentieth-century American literature and the history of American print culture.
She served on the National Academic Advising Association’s (NACADA’s) Board of Directors, chairs the Video Advisory Board charged with revamping the Faculty Advising Training Video, and serves as a mentor in NACADA’s Emerging Leaders Program. Drake does extensive consulting and speaking at colleges and universities on assessment of campus-wide advising programs, faculty advising, rewards and recognition for advising, and advising as teaching.
 
Pat Folsom is Assistant Provost for Enrollment Services and Director of the Academic Advising Center at the University of Iowa. She has worked in academic advising for twenty-seven years in the University’s large, centralized professional advising center, both as an academic advisor and as an advising administrator. During this time, Folsom has overseen the implementation of an advisor-development program that was selected as an exemplary practice for the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) Advisor Training and Development monograph. Folsom also has focused on program development for first-year students at the University, including IowaLink, a first-year program for at-risk students; The College Transition, a first-year seminar program; and College Success Seminar, a course for first-year students who are placed on probation. Her recent advising-related work has focused on advisor development: she has offered a preconference workshop designed for advisors new to the profession for several national conferences and was the editor of The New Advisor Guidebook: Mastering the Art of Advising Through the First Year and Beyond. She is active in NACADA, where she is currently Chair of the Commission on Advisor Training and Development and a member of other commissions and boards as well. Folsom earned a B.A. in 1969 from Ohio Wesleyan University and an M.L.S. from the State University of New York at Geneseo in 1973.
 
Rusty Fox serves as Vice President for Student Development Services at Tarrant County College Southeast Campus, that campus’s Chief Student Affairs Officer. Active in his profession, he presents at national and regional conferences and serves as a member of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) Consultant’s Bureau. He has worked for the past several years as faculty at the American College Testing (ACT)/NACADA Summer Advising Institute and has served at the Administrator’s Institute as well. As a past board member, he served twice as the association’s national commission chair for Two-Year Colleges.
Likewise, Fox is involved in community and educational organizations, currently serving on the board for the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee for the city of Arlington, a board that coordinates one of the largest series of MLK events in the nation.
Fox served as Dean of Student Development and Director of Counseling/ Advising at Oklahoma City Community College, and Coordinator of Academic Advising at Brookhaven College, Dallas. He holds a B.A. in Speech Communications from Texas A&M University and an M.S. in counseling from Texas A&M—Commerce, where he was named an Outstanding Alumnus. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in higher education at Capella University.
 
Virginia N. Gordon is assistant dean emeritus and adjunct associate professor at The Ohio State University. She has extensive experience in teaching, administration, advising, and counseling in higher education settings. Her bibliography includes many books, monographs, book chapters, and journal articles on advising administration, career counseling, working with undecided students, and advisor training. Her most recent publications include The Undecided College Students (2007), Foundations—A Reader for New College Students (2007), and Career Advising—An Academic Advisors’ Guide (2006). She is past president of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) and the founder and first director of the National Clearinghouse on Academic Advising. Gordon has received national acclaim and numerous awards for her contributions to the field, the most fitting of which is NACADA’s naming of its award for outstanding contributions to the field of academic advising the Virginia N. Gordon Award.
 
Paul A. Gore is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Student Success Special Projects Coordinator at the University of Utah. Dr. Gore consults in the United States and abroad with high schools and postsecondary institutions on the development of student success programs. He is the editor of Facilitating the Career Development of Students in Transition, a monograph published by the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, and was recently featured in a teleconference titled Academic and Career Advising: Keys to Student Success. Dr. Gore conducts research on factors influencing high school and college students’ career and academic success, and has published over forty book chapters and research articles in this area. Dr. Gore serves on the editorial boards of Career Development Quarterly and Journal of Career Assessment and is the Chair of the Society for Vocational Psychology, a section of the Division of Counseling Psychology of the American Psychological Association.
 
Thomas J. Grites is assistant to the provost at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. He has been directly involved in and a student of the academic advising process in higher education for over thirty years. Information and materials from his presentations at national conferences and from his publications have been used by advisors in a variety of institutions. He has served as a consultant and faculty development workshop leader to over 100 different campuses, and he has addressed numerous high school and community groups in his home state. He was instrumental in forming the National Academic Advising Association and served as its second president for two terms.
His research and writing have linked the importance of academic advising to such seemingly diverse areas as admissions, general education, high school counseling, economic profits, ethics, collective bargaining, and faculty development. His landmark publication, Academic Advising: Getting Us through the Eighties, served as a basis for the review of campus advising programs for many years. Developmental Academic Advising, of which he is a coauthor, was used as the “standard text” for advising programs and advisor training programs for many years. He has authored more than fifty journal articles, position statements, book chapters, and consultant reports, and he has delivered over seventy conference presentations. He recently completed an orientation and textbook for transfer students.
In addition to his work in academic advising, he has worked in college housing programs on three campuses; he regularly taught a general methods course in teacher education; he has also taught a Freshman Seminar course, a Basic Skills course in Critical Thinking, a graduate course on “Developmental Academic Advising” at Teacher’s College, Columbia University, and most recently a “transfer student seminar” that is modeled on the freshman seminar concept. He has also served on his local Board of Education for over twenty years.
He is a native of Danville, Illinois, and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Illinois State University. His doctoral work was completed at the University of Maryland. Both these institutions have awarded him their Distinguished Alumni Award; most recently he was inducted into the College of Education Hall of Fame at Illinois State during its 150th anniversary celebration.
 
Wesley R. Habley is a Principal Associate and Coordinator of American College Testing’s (ACT’s) Office of State Organizations. He received his B.S. in music education and his M.Ed. in student personnel from the University of Illinois-Urbana /Champaign, and his Ed.D. in educational administration from Illinois State University. Prior to joining ACT, Habley directed advising programs at Illinois State University and the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.
Habley’s recent publications include two chapters in Fostering Student Success in the College Community and What Works in Student Retention? a series of four research reports on college retention practices. He is coeditor of Academic Advising: A Comprehensive Handbook and the author of monographs on four of ACT’s National Surveys of Academic Advising. He contributed chapters to Developmental Academic Advising, Foundations: A College Reader and Faculty Advising Examined, as well as numerous journal articles and chapters in monographs published by Jossey-Bass, the Center for the First Year Experience, and the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA).
Habley is a charter member of NACADA and has served the association in numerous roles, including president and treasurer. He originated the NACADA Summer Institute on Academic Advising in 1987, and in 2006 the NACADA Summer Institute Scholarship was named in his honor. He is also the recipient of NACADA’s awards for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Academic Advising and Service to NACADA.
Habley has served as a consultant, speaker, and workshop leader at more than 125 colleges in the United States, the Middle East, and Canada.
 
Peter L. Hagen serves as Director of the Center for Academic Advising at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. He was the founding Chair of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) Theory and Philosophy of Academic Advising Commission, served as Guest Editor of the NACADA Journal for its Fall 2005 issue, and was a member of the task force that wrote “The Concept of Academic Advising.” For NACADA he currently serves on the Journal’s Editorial Board, the Publications Review Board, and the Research Committee. He won the 2007 Virginia Gordon Award for Service to the Field of Advising.
 
Blane Harding currently serves as the Director of Advising, Recruitment and Retention for the College of Liberal Arts and as an adjunct faculty member for the Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity at Colorado State University. Harding is the former coordinator of the Black Studies program at CSU and has taught courses in African American history and Ethnic Studies for the past eighteen years. He received his B.A. in interdisciplinary communication from the State University of New York at Brockport and his M.A. in nineteenth-century American history from Colorado State University. He has also served as a retention faculty member with the Council for Opportunity in Education which oversees the national TRIO programs and is on the Advisory Board for the National Academic Advising Association Summer Institutes. Harding is a multicultural consultant for the National Academic Advising Association and is involved in a variety of workshops and multicultural training sessions for schools and organizations. He is the recipient of several honors and awards, including CSU Minority Distinguished Service Award, College of Liberal Arts Excellence in Teaching Award, CSU Alumni Association “Six Best” Teacher Award, History Department Phi Alpha Theta Outstanding Professor Award, the Provost’s Jack E. Cermak Advising Award, and most recently the Provost Oliver P. Pennock Distinguished Service Award from CSU.
 
Jocelyn Y. Harney is currently the Vice President of Enrollment and Student Affairs, having formerly served as the Dean of Students at College of DuPage, Associate Dean of Counseling, Transfer and Advising, and as Counseling Faculty. As Vice President of Student Affairs, she is responsible for counseling, career services, co-op, special services for students with disabilities, and new-student orientation, along with general, international, multicultural, developmental education advising. She is also responsible for student judicial, Admissions, Athletics, Financial Aid, Records, Registration, and Student Activities. She has provided institutional leadership for a three-year Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) project to improve advising as a part of institutional accreditation and continues to lead advising improvement and enrollment management efforts campus-wide. She received recognition for the dissertation of the year award from the National Council on Student Development upon receipt of a Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois in Education with a focus on special education and transition leadership. She also secured a M.S. degree in rehabilitation counseling from the University of Illinois and a B.S. in rehabilitation education from Wright State University. Harney has appeared in a national teleconference for the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition and serves on the Board. She continues to serve on various special interest boards and is faculty for the National Association of Academic Advising. She has a number of previous teaching and conference presentations to her credit.
 
Martha (Marti) Hemwall received her B.A. from Lawrence University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology from Brown University. She served as the Dean of Student Academic Services and Associate Professor of Anthropology (adjunct) at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, from 1995 to 2007. In addition to teaching in anthropology, she helped to create curricular programs in both Gender Studies and Ethnic Studies. In her administrative position, she was responsible for student academic affairs, including the faculty advising system, academic support services, disability accommodations, the academic honor code, academic regulations, and the academic standing system. In addition, she supervised the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Hemwall has been active in the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) since 1986, and helped to create the Commission on Small Colleges and Universities, chairing that group from its inception until 1996. She went on to coedit a NACADA monograph, Advising and Learning: Academic Advising from the Perspective of Small Colleges and Universities (2003), and has contributed articles to the NACADA Journal focused on the decline of the developmental paradigm in academic advising, and the emergence of an alternative paradigm based on learning and teaching (1999, 2005). She has presented at numerous conferences in higher education, conducted faculty workshops on effective advising, given presentations on rethinking the nature of academic advising, and done numerous program evaluations.
 
Mary Stuart Hunter is the Assistant Vice-Provost and Executive Director of University 101 and The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition at the University of South Carolina. Her work centers on providing educators with resources to develop personal and professional skills while creating and refining innovative programs to increase undergraduate student learning and success. Her recent publications include coediting Academic Advising: New Insights for Teaching and Learning in the First Year (2007), “The First-Year Experience: An Analysis of Issues and Resources” in the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC & U’s) Peer Review (2006), “Could Fixing Academic Advising Fix Higher Education” in About Campus (2004), “The Second-Year Experience: Turning Attention to the Academy’s Middle Children” in About Campus (2006), and “New Frontiers for Student Affairs Professionals: Teaching and the First-Year Experience” in New Directions for Student Services (2007). She serves on national advisory boards of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Policy Center on the First Year of College, The Network Addressing Collegiate Alcohol and Other Drug Issues, serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Learning Communities Research, and is an elder at Forest Lake Presbyterian Church.
 
Jennifer Crissman Ishler is an assistant professor of Human Development and Family Studies and an affiliate assistant professor of counselor education at The Pennsylvania State University. She holds a B.S. degree in elementary education from Millersville University, an M.S. degree in counseling and college student personnel from Shippensburg University, and a D.Ed. in higher education from The Pennsylvania State University. Her student affairs experience includes residence life, academic advising, and new student programs. Her undergraduate teaching experience includes first-year seminars, human development and family studies courses, and graduate courses in student affairs and counseling. Her research interests include the first-year experiences, assessment in student affairs, and the concept of “friendsickness” and female college students.
 
Peggy Jordan is a Professor of Psychology at Oklahoma City Community College, where she teaches Developmental Psychology and Introduction to Psychology. She was awarded the National Academic Advising Association’s (NACADA’s) 2007 Outstanding Advising Award in the Faculty Advising category and previously served as NACADA’s Two-Year Colleges Commission Chair. Dr. Jordan authored a chapter, “Building Effective Communication Through Listening, Interviewing and Referral” in the NACADA monograph, “The New Advisor Guidebook: Mastering the Art of Academic Advising through the First Year and Beyond” (2007). She was also coeditor for the NACADA monograph on “Advising Special Student Populations” (2007). She has a “Voice of Experience” and an “Exemplary Practices: Oklahoma City Community College” section in the 2003 NACADA Monograph, “Advisor Training.” Her article, “Advising College Students in the 21st Century” was published in the NACADA Journal in Fall 2000. She has served as a faculty member for NACADA’s Faculty Seminar and Summer Institute as well as presented numerous workshops for NACADA regional and national conferences.
Dr. Jordan earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Oklahoma State University. For the first twenty years of her professional career, she worked in various state agencies and a private practice. After years of teaching clients coping skills and strategies to enhance motivation and feelings of worth, Dr. Jordan returned to the college campus, with a strong belief that teaching and advising students offers them the greatest opportunities for empowerment.
 
Jane Kalionzes