001

Table of Contents
 
Jossey-Bass Teacher
Title Page
Copyright Page
About the Book
1. Creativity and Innovation
2. Communication and Collaboration
3. Research and Information Fluency
4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making
5. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making
6. Technology Operations and Concepts
About the Author
Teacher’s Guide
Understanding the Lesson Format
 
Chapter 1: Taking Charge Online
 
Lesson 1: Computer Security
Lesson 2: Online Banking
Lesson 3: Online Research Skills
Lesson 4: Online Retail Shopping
 
Chapter 2: Interacting Online
 
Lesson 1: Your Online Persona
Lesson 2: Online Social Networking
Lesson 3: Online Relationships
Lesson 4: Online Gaming
Lesson 5: Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Networking
 
Chapter 3: Putting the Internet to Work for You
 
Lesson 1: Online Search Skills
Lesson 2: Job Hunting Online
Lesson 3: Money Management with Technology
Lesson 4: Preparing and Filing Income Taxes Online
 
Chapter 4: Other Online Considerations
 
Lesson 1: Online Forms
Lesson 2: Online Communication Basics
Lesson 3: Working Wireless: Network Safety Considerations
Lesson 4: Public Wireless Access Considerations
 
Chapter 5: Using the Internet to Move Forward
 
Lesson 1: What Do I Want to Be?
Lesson 2: Further Schooling
Lesson 3: Online Education: A Newer Option
Lesson 4: Applications, Scholarships, Loans, Grants, and More
 
Optional Chapter Quizzes
“Go Online” Section Summaries
Answer Key
INDEX

Jossey-Bass Teacher
Jossey-Bass Teacher provides educators with practical knowledge and tools to create a positive and lifelong impact on student learning. We offer classroom-tested and research-based teaching resources for a variety of grade levels and subject areas. Whether you are an aspiring, new, or veteran teacher, we want to help you make every teaching day your best.
 
From ready-to-use classroom activities to the latest teaching framework, our value-packed books provide insightful, practical, and comprehensive materials on the topics that matter most to K-12 teachers. We hope to become your trusted source for the best ideas from the most experienced and respected experts in the field.

001

About the Book
In today’s world, many life-skills tasks, from bill paying to applying for a job, are accomplished via the Internet. Before taking advantage of the many opportunities the Internet provides, it is important to know how to maintain personal safety and computer security while engaging in these tasks. i-SAFE Internet Life Skills Activities: Reproducible Projects on Learning to Safely Handle Life Online, Grades 9-12 was written to address many of these tasks and activities that are frequently done online, and also to introduce you to some activities you may never have considered going online to do.
 
This interactive and empowering book of information and activities is designed for the high school student, college student, or young adult. The lessons can be integrated into schools, offered by clubs, or administered by parents. They are set up so they can be completed in a self-guided manner by anyone who wants to learn about safely handling life online.
 
The following chart provides the scope of the chapters in the book.
SCOPE OF THE BOOK
Chapter/Topic Lesson Overviews
Taking Charge Online (Ch. 1) Computer Security Computer Security Online Banking Online Research Skills Online Retail Shopping Online Retail ShoppingComputer Security: Using the Internet for any activity opens you up to a variety of security risks, including risks to the computer and threats to personal security. This lesson covers four main areas of computer maintenance that can ensure computer security before engaging in Internet life skills: firewall protection, malicious code and anti-virus programs, system updates, and spyware removal.
Online Banking: This lesson explores the benefits and drawbacks to online banking and gives you guidance for accessing actual online banking tutorials. You will learn about the risks of online banking and how to use technology to meet your own personal needs effectively and safely.
Online Research Skills: The Internet is a vast resource that helps you find information about just about any question imaginable. However, it is important to realize that not all information found online is true, accurate, and valid. This lesson provides you practice in evaluating the authenticity of information found on Web sites.
Online Retail Shopping: Shopping online calls for revealing private information that could be used inappropriately. Knowing the benefits and risks can make you a better, smarter consumer. This lesson explores the safety and security issues involved with online shopping and provides practice in selecting safer shopping options.
Interacting Online (Ch. 2) Your Online Persona Your Online Persona Online Social Networking Online Relationships Online Gaming Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Peer-to-Peer (P2P) NetworkingYour Online Persona: Using the Internet for any activity opens you up to a variety of security risks, including risks to the computer and threats to personal security. This lesson covers your online persona, including e-mail address, password, screen name/user ID, and personal Web sites.
Online Social Networking: Many people of all ages spend hours each day surfing and interacting on social networking Web sites. These sites integrate Web profiles, blogs, instant messaging, e-mail, music downloads, photo galleries, classified listings, events, groups, chat rooms, and user forums to create connected communities in which you are able to publish details about your life. This lesson covers the safety and security issues inherent to this new way to socialize.
Online Relationships: In this age of technology, you are bound to meet others while online and may develop ongoing relationships. In addition, many offline relationships use the Internet to communicate through e-mail, IM, chat, etc. This lesson covers the important issues involved in meeting someone new online or continuing an online relationship offline.
Online Gaming: Computer games used to be a solitary activity, for which your only interaction was with the computer or game console. Now, however, gaming has been revolutionized by the interactive community of online gaming. Features, such as voice chat, enhance and aid in the interactivity of this new medium. This lesson makes you aware of the risks associated with gaming activities and offers steps to take so you will avoid becoming an online victim.
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Networking: P2P networking can be a beneficial way for you to interact with others and exchange pictures, word docs, and other media. However, P2P networking is best known for its illegal uses—illegal movie and music sharing, and more. This lesson covers the legal issues as well as the safety and security risks associated with P2P operation.
Putting the Internet to Work for You (Ch. 3) Online Search Skills Job Hunting Online Money Management with Technology Preparing and Filing Income Taxes OnlineOnline Search Skills: Is there any wonder Google is one of the most requested webpages online? You may already use search engines every day. This lesson helps you search more quickly and more accurately by teaching you basic online search skills.
Job Hunting Online: More and more companies are recruiting candidates online using online job sites and online ad postings, or by searching online resumes. This lesson teaches you skills for effective online job hunting.
Money Management with Technology: It is amazing how much you can do online with your money, such as pay bills, bank, and more. This lesson guides you through the money maze so you will have the skills to confidently manage your assets online and show you how to do so safely and securely.
Preparing and Filing Income Taxes Online: Eventually everyone has to pay taxes. This lesson explains how to file online, the safety risks for you to consider, and whether you qualify for free software and filing.
Other Online Considerations (Ch. 4) Online Forms Online Forms Online Communication Basics Working Wireless: Network Safety Considerations Public Wireless Access ConsiderationsOnline Forms: The Internet is a wonderful place to shop, play games, conduct research, and more. However, many sites ask you to provide personal information in order to create an online identity, confirm identity and age, help to customize preferences, etc. This information is solicited via online forms. Online forms can make your online experience confusing. When is it OK to give out your personal information? When should you not do so?
Online Communication Basics: There’s more to communicating online than meets the eye. There are many risks, dangers, and pitfalls. We’ll cover the numerous ways to communicate online and teach you what to watch out for.
Working Wireless: Network Safety Considerations: More and more technology is going wireless. Chances are if you have multiple computers or a laptop at home, you’ve chosen to go with a wireless network. However, going wireless at home brings up possible security and safety concerns.
Public Wireless Access Considerations: With a laptop computer and a wireless network adapter, you can connect anywhere there is an open wireless network. This includes public places that advertise wireless access, such as coffee shops, airports, hotels, and other spaces. However, just as there are security risks associated with home wireless networks, there are risks involved in using a public network.
Using the Internet to Move Forward (Ch. 5) What Do I Want to Be? What Do I Want to Be? Further Schooling Online Education: A Newer Option Applications, Scholarships, Loans, Grants, and MoreWhat Do I Want to Be?: High school is nearly over and you have to figure out where the rest of your life will take you. This step- by-step guide helps young adults figure out where they are going and how to get there. This section starts with determining what you want to do with the rest of your life and how you hope to support yourself.
Further Schooling: Teens and young adults either select a few careers they are interested in or know for sure what career goal they want to pursue. Does that career include further schooling? We discuss how you know what you need and where to go for more schooling.
Online Education: A Newer Option: More and more accredited colleges are adding online or distance education programs. This section takes a look at the various levels of online education, potential benefits and drawbacks, and how you can learn more about different programs. Finally, we’ll deal with how to select an online university.
Applications, Scholarships, Loans, Grants, and More: Just as education has gone online and high tech, so too have the resources to apply to schools and financial aid. As you prepare to go to college—whether four-year, community, or online—chances are you will be online to apply, find financial aid, locate loans, and more.
This book has been extensively aligned to the ISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards for Students referenced below:

1. Creativity and Innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:
• Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
• Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.
• Use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.
• Identify trends and forecast possibilities.

2. Communication and Collaboration

Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:
• Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
• Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
• Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
• Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

3. Research and Information Fluency

Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students:
• Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
• Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
• Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks.
• Process data and report results.

4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Students use critical-thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students:
• Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
• Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
• Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
• Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

5. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:
• Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.
• Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.
• Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.
• Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

6. Technology Operations and Concepts

Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students:
• Understand and use technology systems.
• Select and use applications effectively and productively.
• Troubleshoot systems and applications.
• Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.

About the Author
Founded in 1998 and active in all fifty states, i-SAFE Inc. (www.isafe.org) is the leader in e-Safety education. i-SAFE is a nonprofit corporation whose mission is to educate and empower students to safely and responsibly take control of their Internet experiences. i-SAFE provides knowledge that enables them to recognize and avoid dangerous, destructive, or unlawful online behavior, and to respond appropriately. This is accomplished through dynamic K through 12 curriculum and community-outreach programs. i-SAFE is the only comprehensive e-Safety program available that incorporates community outreach and youth empowerment in education-based materials.
 
i-SAFE’s education component provides students with up-to-date, interactive, and age-appropriate e-Safety curriculum lessons covering a full spectrum of topics ranging from cyber bullying prevention and response to safety on social networking sites and the legal use of intellectual property found online. The prevention-oriented curriculum employs peer-to-peer communication and cooperative learning activities to help students retain this valuable information. The Outreach component facilitates the extension of students’ newly acquired e-Safety knowledge beyond the classrooms and effectively raises awareness about online safety throughout the community. Youth empowerment is the link. Students are encouraged to become student mentors who communicate i-SAFE’s online safety message via peer-to-peer contact and exciting community-wide activities, events and rallies. Since 2002, more than twenty-eight million students have been educated and empowered through i-SAFE’s education and outreach programs to be safe and responsible online citizens.
 
At the same time, i-SAFE’s professional development training prepares educators to teach the i-SAFE curriculum. Similar i-SAFE trainings for parents, for adults over the age of fifty, and for law enforcement educate and raise awareness about Internet safety in communities across the country.

Teacher’s Guide
002
The complete i-SAFE Internet Life Skills unit is comprised of a series of five lessons addressing common life skills that are frequently completed on the Internet. This unit of instruction is designed to be integrated into career/life skills, technology curriculum, and/or general Internet safety and security instruction for high school and college-age learners. Each chapter includes student activity pages and a quiz. It is not necessary to complete the entire series in order to be effective—select topics that are most relevant to the student group. Workbook topics are set up to be completed by the student in a self-guided manner. The complete i-SAFE Internet Life Skills unit includes the following:
Chapter 1: Taking Charge Online
• Computer Security
• Online Banking
• Online Research Skills
• Online Retail Shopping
Chapter 2: Interacting Online
• Your Online Persona
• Online Social Networking
• Online Relationships
• Online Gaming
• Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Networking
Chapter 3: Putting the Internet to Work for You
• Online Search Skills
• Job Hunting Online
• Money Management with Technology
• Preparing and Filing Income Taxes Online
Chapter 4: Other Online Considerations
• Online Forms
• Online Communication Basics
• Working Wireless: Network Safety Considerations
• Public Wireless Access Considerations
Chapter 5: Using the Internet to Move Forward
• What Do I Want to Be?
• Further Schooling
• Online Education: A Newer Option
• Applications, Scholarships, Loans, Grants, and More

Understanding the Lesson Format
003
Each chapter is designed to help the student master a selection of basic online life skills. Each lesson is presented in sections to fully address the topic and meet the learning needs of a variety of learners. Lesson sections include:
Topic Overview: A general description of the topic.
Vocabulary: Critical terms and definitions used in the lesson.
Talk About It: Provides thought-provoking questions. Depending on classroom setup, students can be directed to discuss with partners, in small groups, or as a class.
Free Write: Supports exploration of the topic through a writing prompt and space to jot down thoughts and previous knowledge.
Think About It: Reference information and materials to consider specific to the topic.
Activity: Directions to complete either a directed or worksheet activity to support learning.
Go Online: Provides an activity set up by the instructor to go online and apply what has been learned, by either researching a topic or completing a task.
Reaching Others: Provides guidance for extending what has been learned by sharing this information with others.
Take the following steps to prepare for each lesson.
1. Review the lesson topics.
2. Familiarize yourself with the “Think About It” section, which provides students with direct reference information and additional sources to consider.
3. Prepare information for students on how they will implement the “Go Online” section. Section summaries are located at the end of the book to facilitate your preparation.
4. Optional: Prepare any additional reference material of your choice.
To implement each lesson:
1. Provide each student or small student group with a copy of the student pages for the lesson.
2. Review the lesson format outlined above (and also provided in the student pages).
3. Review any additional resource materials of your choice with the students.
4. Direct students to work through the lesson topics at the desired pace.
5. If desired, cover the Topic Overview, Vocabulary, and Talk About It sections as a large group before beginning independent work.
6. An optional quiz is provided to be administered upon completion of each lesson.
Additional resources
Additional resources are provided in the “Think About It” section of each lesson. Refer to the i-SAFE i-EDUCATOR Times newsletters, located under “Quick Links” at http://www.isafe.org and general i-SAFE lesson plans on similar topics for additional resource materials and background information, if desired.

Chapter 1: Taking Charge Online
004
Chapter 1, Taking Charge Online, includes the following lessons:
• Computer Security
• Online Banking
• Online Research Skills
• Online Retail Shopping
Understanding the Lesson Format
This chapter is designed to help you master a selection of basic online life skills. Each lesson is presented in sections to fully address the topic. Lesson sections include:
005
• Topic Overview: General description of the topic.
006
• Vocabulary: Critical terms and definitions used in the lesson.
007
• Talk About It: Provides thought-provoking questions. Depending on classroom setup, students can be directed to discuss with a partner, in a small group, or as a class.
008
• Free Write: Supports exploration of the topic through a writing prompt and space to jot down thoughts and previous knowledge.
009
• Think About It: Reference information and materials to consider specific to the topic.
010
• Activity: Each activity section includes directions to complete either a directed or worksheet activity to support learning.
011
• Go Online: This section provides an activity set up by the instructor to go online and apply what has been learned, either by researching a topic or completing a task.
012
• Reaching Others: This section provides guidance for extending what has been learned by sharing this information with others.
013
• Self-Check: A quick review to be sure you understand the concepts just presented.
014
Additional Resources
Your instructor may provide you with additional online and/or offline resources to complete these lessons.
Quiz
Your instructor may administer a chapter quiz upon completion of the lessons.
015

Lesson 1: Computer Security

Section 1

016

Topic Overview

Using the Internet for any activity opens the user to a variety of security risks, including risks to the computer and threats to personal security. In addition, contrary to what many people think, computers are not designed to be maintenance-free. Just like cars, they need routine maintenance. And, like cars, they run better if treated well. To help you keep your machine running well and, better yet, running securely, this lesson will provide information about basic security maintenance skills and proactive prevention techniques for those who use the Internet.
This lesson covers four main areas of computer security maintenance:
1. Firewall protection
2. System updates
3. Malicious code and anti-virus programs
4. Spyware removal
Goal: The goal is for you (a) to understand the importance of the security measures discussed here and (b) to know the order in which to implement computer security protection measures in order to ensure that you are working in a secure computer environment.
017

Vocabulary

Familiarize yourself with the following terms and refer to this section throughout this lesson as you work through the activities.
Adware: Another name for spyware.
Anti-virus software: Computer programs designed to scan files and take proactive measures in order to prevent malicious code from attacking a computer.
Firewall: A firewall is simply a program or hardware device designed to prevent unauthorized access to or from a private network by filtering the information coming through your Internet connection into your computer. Firewalls can be hardware, software, or a combination of both.
Macro: A single computer instruction that results in a series of instructions in machine language. For example, you can program the computer so your direction “control-t” causes the font to bold, italicize, and center—one direction taking care of three actions.
Malicious code: Malicious code includes any and all programs (including macros and scripts) that are deliberately coded to cause an unexpected (and usually unwanted) event on a user’s PC. Viruses, worms, and Trojan horses fall under this category. Any of these types of malicious code can cause your computer to act up:
Trojan horse: A Trojan horse cannot run on its own. It depends on tricking the user into running the program. It pretends to be something it is not. One common example: A user downloads and loads a freeware game. In addition to the game, the program also installs spyware or something else in the background which, in turn, runs on his or her computer.
Virus: A virus is a malicious code that executes itself and replicates itself. For example, if you open an infected Word file, the virus will run and then try to infect other Word files on your computer (replication).
Worm: To classify as a worm, the malicious code not only executes itself, but then attempts to make copies of itself from one place to another. For example, if your infected Word program then attempts to access your e-mail account and send itself in an e-mail to everyone on your address list, it is a worm.
Script: In computer programming, a script is a program or sequence of instructions that is interpreted or carried out by another program.
Spyware: Spyware is software that monitors and gathers user information without a user’s knowledge and then transmits it over the Internet to a parent company. Spyware can gather basic information such as what webpages you view, your shopping habits, and so forth. It can also be used to gather e-mail addresses, passwords, and even credit card numbers. In addition, it can slow down your computer and your Internet connection as it transmits information.
Windows OS updates (system updates): Windows operating system updates, also known as “patches,” are comprised of computer code designed to correct weaknesses in your computer system.
018

Talk About It