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WILEY BLACKWELL COMPANIONS TO SOCIOLOGY

The Wiley Blackwell Companions to Sociology provide introductions to emerging topics and theoretical orientations in sociology as well as presenting the scope and quality of the discipline as it is currently configured. Essays in the Companions tackle broad themes or central puzzles within the field and are authored by key scholars who have spent considerable time in research and reflection on the questions and controversies that have activated interest in their area. This authoritative series will interest those studying sociology at advanced undergraduate or graduate level as well as scholars in the social sciences and informed readers in applied disciplines.

The Blackwell Companion to Major Classical Social Theorists
Edited by George Ritzer

The Blackwell Companion to Major Contemporary Social Theorists
Edited by George Ritzer

The Blackwell Companion to Criminology
Edited by Colin Sumner

The Blackwell Companion to Social Movements
Edited by David A. Snow, Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi

The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society
Edited by Austin Sarat

The Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Culture
Edited by Mark Jacobs and Nancy Hanrahan

The Blackwell Companion to Social Inequalities
Edited by Mary Romero and Eric Margolis

The New Blackwell Companion to Social Theory
Edited by Bryan S. Turner

The New Blackwell Companion to Medical Sociology
Edited by William C. Cockerham

The New Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Religion
Edited by Bryan S. Turner

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Major Social Theorists
Edited by George Ritzer and Jeffrey Stepnisky

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Sociology
Edited by George Ritzer

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology
Edited by Edwin Amenta, Kate Nash, and Alan Scott

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Families

Edited by Judith Treas, Jacqueline Scott, and Martin Richards

Also available:

The Blackwell Companion to Globalization
Edited by George Ritzer

The New Blackwell Companion to the City
Edited by Gary Bridge and Sophie Watson

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to

The Sociology of Families

Edition by

Judith Treas, Jacqueline Scott, and Martin Richards

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Contributors

Irma Arriagada is a Chilean Sociologist. She graduated from the University of Concepción and pursued her studies at the London School of Economics and I.D.E.A., University of Santiago, Chile. She worked at ECLAC-United Nations from 1974 to 2008, is an international consultant for the UN, and a researcher at the CEM-Chile (Women’s Studies Center) on gender and family topics. She has published more than 70 papers and edited 5 books. She coauthored Cadenas globales de cuidados: el papel de las migrantes peruanas en la provisión de cuidados en Chile, 2012, UN-Women (Global Care Chains: The Role of Peruvian Migrants in the Provision of Care in Chile).

Loretta Baldassar is Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Western Australia and Adjunct Principal Research Fellow, School of Political and Social Inquiry, Monash University. Loretta has published extensively on transnational families, including Families Caring Across Borders (with Baldock & Wilding, Palgrave 2007), Intimacy and Italian Migration (edited with Gabaccia, Fordham Uni Press 2011), and many journal articles. Her most recent book is Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care (edited with Merla, Routledge, 2013).

Ulrich Beck is Professor of Sociology at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, and since 2013, the Principal Investigator of the ERC project: “Methodological Cosmopolitanism—In the Laboratory of Climate Change.” Since 1997, he is British Journal of Sociology Visiting Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and since 2011 has served as a Professor at the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Paris. Her publications include Risk Society (Sage, 1992), Individualization (with Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim; Sage, 2002), The Cosmopolitan Vision (Polity, 2006), and A God of One’s Own (Polity, 2010).

Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim is Professor of Sociology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology/University Trondheim. Her research focuses on migration and ethnicity, medicine and health, and the sociology of love and family. Her publications include The Social Implications of Bioengineering (Humanities Press, 1995), The Normal Chaos of Love (with Ulrich Beck; Polity, 1995), Reinventing the Family: In Search of New Lifestyles (Polity, 2002), Wir und die Anderen (Suhrkamp, 2007), and Distant Love (with Ulrich Beck; Polity, 2013).

Timothy J. Biblarz is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern California. His research investigates the roots and consequences of social inequalities in the United States over time, with an emphasis on social mobility and family and intergenerational issues.

Susan L. Brown is Professor of Sociology and Codirector of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University. A family demographer, her research interests focus on how family structure is tied to individual well-being. In particular, she examines how new family forms, including cohabitation, are related to the health and well-being of children and adults. Much of her recent work addresses intimate partnership transitions in later life.

Nathaniel Burke is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Southern California. A New Directions in Feminist Research Fellow, he studies gender, masculinity, sexuality, labor, and inequality. His research investigates the division of childcare in families headed by gay fathers and the labor experiences of gay male sex workers.

Deborah Carr is Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University and the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research. She studies families in later life, with an emphasis on the psychological consequences of widowhood and divorce. Her recent work includes an NIA-funded project exploring the ways that family relationships affect older adults’ preparations for end-of-life medical care and decision-making.

Megan Carroll is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Southern California. She is interested in gender, sexuality, and the politics of family change. Her dissertation explores the triumphs and challenges of gay fathers’ collective identity formation, drawing from ethnographic research of gay parenting groups.

Yen-Chun Cheryl Chen is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge. She is a Cambridge Gates Scholar, entering in 2010. She has been trained within political science, social work, and sociology. She had applied social identity theory to look at ethnic relations in the Russian Federation and has always been inspired by interdisciplinary work related to family lives, especially women’s life course development. Her current research focuses on familial ideology, intergenerational relationships, and the trend of marriage postponement in Taiwan.

Emily M. Douglas, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Social Work at Bridgewater State University. Her areas of expertise include male victims of partner violence, fatal child maltreatment, corporal punishment, and divorced families. She has authored more than 30 articles and 3 books on social policies for divorced families, family policy, and corporal punishment. She is the founder and director of the National Research Conference on Child and Family Programs and Policy.

Thomas Alan Elliott is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include sexuality, culture, and social movements. He is currently working on his dissertation about national newspaper coverage of homosexuality since 1950 and the role the LGBT movement has played in changing that coverage.

Christopher G. Ellison is Professor of Sociology and Dean’s Distinguished Professor of Social Science at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He has published widely on religious variations in family life, with particular attention to child-rearing attitudes and practices and marital and relationship functioning. His other major areas of interest include the implications of religiousness and spirituality for mental and physical health and mortality risk, as well as the role of religion within racial/ethnic minority populations in the United States.

Rys Farthing is currently a DPhil Candidate in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on child poverty and explores the impacts of growing up in low-income families from young people’s perspectives.

Juho Härkönen is University Lecturer of sociology at Stockholm University and Visiting Professor of sociology at the University of Turku. His research interests cover the life course, family sociology and demography, and social stratification. His recent works have been published in Demography, European Journal of Population, European Societies, European Sociological Review, Social Forces, Social Politics, and Social Science and Medicine.

Joshua A. Hendrix is a doctoral student in Sociology at North Carolina State University. His research interests concern the ways that parental work schedules and household characteristics influence individual, family, and child outcomes, with special emphases on child psychological well-being and delinquency. A forthcoming publication examines how the timing of parental work schedules influences adolescent delinquent behaviors and will appear in the Journal of Family Issues.

Denise A. Hines, PhD, is an Associate Research Professor in the Department of Psychology department at Clark University, where she is also director of the Massachusetts Family Impact Seminars and the Clark Anti-Violence Education Program. She has authored over 30 articles and 2 books on family violence. She has been the principal investigator on five federal grants, focusing on the etiology of partner violence, prevention of interpersonal violence, and the health of male partner violence victims.

Melanie N.G. Jackson is a doctoral student in the Department of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota, specializing in Couple and Family Therapy. Melanie’s research interest is in family gerontology. She is working on projects focusing on issues in families and aging, including dementia caregiving, family inheritance decisions, and health decision-making among older rural women.

Matthijs Kalmijn is Professor of Sociology at the University of Amsterdam and member of the Netherlands Royal Academy of Sciences. He is known for his work on marriage, divorce, and intergenerational relationships and involved in the development of several large-scale survey projects such as the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study (NKPS). He recently published on intergenerational support in the Journals of Gerontology (2013) and on marriage in Demography (2013). More information is available on www.matthijskalmijn.nl.

Majella Kilkey is Reader in Social Policy at the University of Sheffield, UK. Her research interrogates family policies and practices through the lens of migration. Recent publications include Gender, Migration and Domestic Work (with Perrons, Plomien, Hondagneu-Sotelo, and Ramirez, Palgrave, 2013) and articles in Global Networks and International Migration. With Lutz and Palenga-Möllenbeck she edited the 2010 special issue “Domestic and care work at the intersection of welfare, gender and migration regimes: European experiences” (Social Policy and Society, 9 (3)).

Rhiannon A. Kroeger is a postdoctoral fellow at the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on the ways in which socioeconomic stratification fundamentally shapes the influences of other institutions, such as the family, on health. Her current research examines how socioeconomic stratification shapes the structure and quality of intimate unions, and whether any socioeconomic differences in intimate union experiences contribute to socioeconomic health disparities throughout the life course.

Jack Lam is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. He conducts research at the intersection of work and organizations, the life course, and health and well-being. He has recently published in Work and Occupations and Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. His dissertation research is a longitudinal study focusing on antecedents, patterns, and the health consequences of job insecurity for a cohort of individuals in their early adulthood.

Trude Lappegård is a senior researcher in the Research Department of Statistics Norway. Her research focuses on gender issues, family policy, and fertility behavior. Her current projects investigate the relationship between new family dynamics, gender equality, and fertility choices in Western societies and demographic consequences of the Nordic family policy.

Sean R. Lauer is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. In his research, he applies institutional approaches from sociology to the study of families and communities. His current research on communities examines community-based organizations. His research on family has focused on the institution of marriage, including money management.

Jui-Chung Allen Li holds a joint appointment in the Institute of European and American Studies and the Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, and is an Associate Professor of Social Research and Public Policy, New York University Abu Dhabi. His primary research interests include marriage formation and disruption, the causes and consequences of population aging (and related policy responses), and justice and inequality.

Hadas Mandel is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. Her research focuses on cross-country variations in gender inequality and their relationship to class inequality and the role of the welfare state. Selected publications on this topic appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Social Forces, and The British Journal of Sociology. Her current research project deals with the role of gender in the determination of wage inequality between occupations.

Wendy D. Manning is a Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Sociology at Bowling Green State University. She is the Codirector of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research and Director of the Center for Family Demographic Research. She is a family demographer with a research emphasis on family structure, union formation and stability, and relationships among adolescents as well as adults.

Laura Merla is Deputy Director of the Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Families and Sexualities (CIRFASE) at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Her publications include a special issue of Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques, 41 (1) (coedited with Baldassar); papers in Autrepart, 57–58 and International Migration (published online); and Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care (edited with Baldassar, Routledge, 2013). Her forthcoming publications include the book Transnational Family Solidarity in Local Contexts (Routledge, Transnationalism Series).

Phyllis Moen holds a McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair and is Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota, arriving there in 2003 after 25 years as a professor at Cornell University where she held the Ferris Family Chair in Life Course Studies. Dr. Moen investigates the relationship between institutions, health, and the gendered life course. Her most recent book (2005) was The Career Mystique: Cracks in the American Dream. She is part of the Work, Family and Health Network and is currently writing a book on the experiences of Boomers.

Toby L. Parcel is Professor of Sociology at North Carolina State University. She is recognized for her research on parental working conditions’ effects on child outcomes and for her studies of family and school effects on academic achievement and social adjustment. Recent publications on these topics have appeared in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Research in Social Stratification and Mobility.

Karen D. Pyke, PhD, an associate professor of Sociology at the University of California, Riverside, studies second-generation Asian Americans and internalized oppression. She has recently published on gender inequity among faculty, power dynamics in age-different marriages (with Michele Adams), and the taboo on the study of internalized racism. Her research appears in Gender & Society, Journal of Marriage and Family, Journal of Family Issues, Sociological Perspectives, etc.

Martin Richards is Emeritus Professor of Family Research at the Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge. His research concerns families and genetic and assisted reproductive technologies and the social and ethical issues these technologies raise. He is vice chair of the UK Biobank Ethics and Governance Council and chairs a Working Party of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics on the Linking and Use of Biological and Health Data. His recent books include Reproductive Donation: Practice, Policy and Bioethics (edited with G. Pennings and J. Appleby, Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Kevin M. Roy, PhD, is Associate Professor of Family Science at the University of Maryland College Park School of Public Health. His research focuses on the life course of men on the margins of families and work. Through participant observation and life history interviews, he explores the intersection of policy systems with caregiving and with providing roles in kin networks. He received a PhD in Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University in 1999.

Jacqueline Scott is Professor of Empirical Sociology at the University of Cambridge and is a Fellow of Queens’ College. From 2004 to 2010, she was director of a large UK research network on gender inequalities in production and reproduction (GeNet) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. GeNet produced three edited books published by Edward Elgar: Scott et al. (2008) Women and Employment, Changing Lives and New Challenges; Scott et al. (2010) Gender Inequalities in the 21st Century; and Scott et al. (2012) Gendered Lives, Gender Inequalities in Production and Reproduction. Her current research interests include family change and migration processes through the life course.

Alison Shaw is a Senior Research Fellow in Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford, UK. She is recognized for research with Pakistani families in the United Kingdom. Her research interests include ethnicity and health; social aspects of genetics; as well as kinship, gender, and transnational marriages. Her most recent book is Negotiating Risk: British Pakistani Experiences of Genetics (2009).

Wendy Sigle-Rushton is a Reader in Gender and Family Studies and an Associate at the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at the London School of Economics where she convenes an MSc program in Gender, Policy, and Inequalities. She has published extensively on the relationship between family structure and the well-being of children and adults. Ongoing work considers the interaction of family structure, ethnicity, and nativity in the production of child health outcomes in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Pamela J. Smock is Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor and Research Professor at the Population Studies Center of the Institute for Social Research. Her research focuses on changing family patterns in the United States and the implications of social class and gender inequality for families. She has published on an array of topics including cohabitation, the economic consequences of divorce and marriage, nonresident fatherhood, and the motherhood wage penalty.

Kristen W. Springer is Associate Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University and the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research. She studies gender, families, and health with an emphasis on gendered dynamics in families and men’s health. Her recent research includes an NIA-funded project examining the relationship between health outcomes and income dynamics across 30 years of marriage. She is also using experimental methods to explore how masculinity threats affect men’s health.

Murray A. Straus, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Sociology and founder and Codirector of the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire. He has been President of the National Council on Family Relations, the Society for the Study of Social Problems, and the Eastern Sociological Society. He is the author or coauthor of over 200 articles on the family and research methods, as well as 17 books on partner violence, family violence, and corporal punishment.

Göran Therborn is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Cambridge University, to which he is still partly attached, and Affiliated Professor at Linnaeus University, Sweden. He has published extensively on regionally and globally comparative issues, including, in recent years, Between Sex and Power: Family in the World, l900–2000 (2004), Inequalities of the World (2006), Les sociétés d’Europe du XX au XXIe siècle (2009), The World: A Beginner’s Guide (2011), and The Killing Fields of Inequality (2013). He is currently working on a global study of Cities of Power.

Judith Treas is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. A Fellow of the National Council on Family Relations and the Gerontological Society of America, she is recognized for research on aging and the life course, family, gender, and inequality. Her projects investigate couples’ organization of households and the family lives of elderly immigrants. Her most recent book (with Sonja Drobnič) is Dividing the Domestic: Men, Women and Household Work in Cross-National Perspective (2010).

Pernilla Tunberger is a PhD student in the Department of Government, University of Uppsala, Sweden. She has an MSc in Gender and Social Policy from London School of Economics and has previously published (with Wendy Sigle-Rushton) “Continuity and Change in Swedish Family Policy Reforms,” Journal of European Social Policy, 21 (3) (2011). Her current research investigates how labor market flexibilization in different European welfare states affects the conditions for individuals’ combination of earning and caring.

Eric D. Widmer is Professor of Sociology at the University of Geneva. His long-term interests include family and other interpersonal relations, life course research, and social networks. Along with others, he has been developing for two decades research on families in a configurational perspective. His most recent book is Family Configurations: A Structural Approach to Family Diversity (2010). Information on his work and publications are available at www.edwidmer.org.

Raelene Wilding is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. Her research uses a range of qualitative methods to focus on the intersections of mobilities, relationships, and communication technologies. Her publications include Families Caring Across Borders (with Baldassar and Baldock, Palgrave, 2007) and Race and Ethnic Relations (with Fozdar and Hawkins, OUP, 2009), as well as numerous articles in journals, including in Global Networks and the Journal of Refugee Studies.

Kristi Williams is Associate Professor of Sociology at The Ohio State University and Research Associate at the Institute for Population Research. She studies the influence of family and other social relationships on health and well-being. Her recent work includes an NICHD-funded project examining the consequences of nonmarital and early fertility for the health of women and their offspring and identifying the role that subsequent marriage plays in shaping these outcomes.

Xiaohe Xu is Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He has published extensively on comparative family and family studies. His recent publications examine the multifaceted linkages between religion and dating, marriage timing, and child development.

Carrie Yodanis is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. In her research she examines gender and inequality from a cross-national perspective, including such topics as the division of housework, management of money in marriage, violence against women, and occupational and class segregation. Her current research examines the change and lack of change in the institution of marriage.