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Multifunctional Nanocomposites for Energy and Environmental Applications


Multifunctional Nanocomposites for Energy and Environmental Applications


1. Aufl.

von: Zhanhu Guo, Yuan Chen, Na Luna Lu

268,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-VCH
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 02.01.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9783527342471
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 704

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Beschreibungen

Focusing on real applications of nanocomposites and nanotechnologies for sustainable development, this book shows how nanocomposites can help to solve energy and environmental problems, including a broad overview of energy-related applications and a unique selection of environmental topics. Clearly structured, the first part covers such energy-related applications as lithium ion batteries, solar cells, catalysis, thermoelectric waste heat harvesting and water splitting, while the second part provides unique perspectives on environmental fields, including nuclear waste management and carbon dioxide capture and storage. The result is a successful combination of fundamentals for newcomers to the field and the latest results for experienced scientists, engineers, and industry researchers.
Contents to Volume 1 Preface xiii 1 Introduction to Nanocomposites 1Xingru Yan and Zhanhu Guo References 4 2 Advanced Nanocomposite Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries 7Jiurong Liu, Shimei Guo, Chenxi Hu, Hailong Lyu, Xingru Yan, and Zhanhu Guo 2.1 Introduction 7 2.2 Advanced Nanocomposites as Anode Materials for LIBs 8 2.2.1 Carbonaceous Nanocomposites 9 2.2.2 Carbon-Free Nanocomposites 15 2.3 Advanced Nanocomposites as Cathode Materials for LIBs 17 2.3.1 Traditional Cathode 18 2.3.1.1 Lithium Transition Metal Oxides 19 2.3.1.2 Vanadium Oxide 19 2.3.1.3 Lithium Phosphates 20 2.3.2 Advanced Nanocomposites as Cathode Materials 21 2.3.2.1 Coating 21 2.3.2.2 Composite with Carbon Nanotubes of Graphene 24 2.3.2.3 Doping 26 References 27 3 Carbon Nanocomposites in Electrochemical Capacitor Applications 33Long Chen, LiliWu, and Jiahua Zhu 3.1 Introduction 33 3.2 Working Principle of Electrochemical Capacitor 34 3.2.1 Electric Double Layer Capacitor 34 3.2.2 Pseudocapacitor 35 3.3 Characterization Techniques for Supercapacitor 36 3.3.1 Electrode Preparation and Testing Cell Assembling 36 3.3.1.1 Two-Electrode Method 36 3.3.1.2 Three-Electrode Method 37 3.3.2 Selection of Electrolyte 37 3.3.3 Energy Storage Property Evaluation 38 3.3.3.1 Capacitance 38 3.3.3.2 Energy Density and Power Density 39 3.3.3.3 Stability 40 3.4 State-of-Art Carbon Nanocomposite Electrode 41 3.4.1 Design Principles of Advanced Electrodes 41 3.4.1.1 Electrical Conductivity 41 3.4.1.2 Surface Area 42 3.4.1.3 Suitable Pore Size 42 3.4.2 Carbon/Carbon Nanocomposites 42 3.4.2.1 Graphene/CNTs 43 3.4.2.2 Graphene/Carbon Black 46 3.4.2.3 Porous Carbon/CNTs 46 3.4.3 Carbon/Metal Oxide Nanocomposites 47 3.4.3.1 Graphene/Metal Oxide 47 3.4.3.2 CNTs/Metal Oxide 49 3.4.3.3 Porous Carbon/Metal Oxide 51 3.4.4 Carbon/Conductive Polymer Nanocomposites 52 3.4.4.1 Graphene/Conductive Polymer 52 3.4.4.2 CNTs/Conductive Polymer 54 3.4.4.3 Porous Carbon/Conductive Polymer 57 3.4.4.4 Ternary Structured Nanocomposites 57 3.5 Summary 58 References 58 4 Application of Nanostructured Electrodes in Halide Perovskite Solar Cells and Electrochromic Devices 67Qinglong Jiang, Xiaoqiao Zeng, Le Ge, Xiangyi Luo, and Lilin He 4.1 Application of Nanostructured Electrodes for Halide Perovskite Solar Cells 67 4.1.1 Introduction 67 4.1.2 Halide Perovskite Material 67 4.1.3 Halide Perovskite Solar Cells 68 4.1.3.1 HTM Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells 69 4.1.3.2 Cathodes 69 4.1.4 Planar Structure Photoanodes for Perovskite Solar Cell 71 4.1.5 Nanostructured Electrodes for Perovskite Solar Cell 71 4.1.5.1 Mesoscopic Nanoparticles for Perovskite Solar Cells 71 4.1.5.2 3D Nanowires for Perovskite Solar Cells 71 4.1.6 Current Challenges for Halide Perovskite Solar Cell 74 4.1.6.1 Lead and Lead-Free Perovskite Solar Cell 74 4.1.6.2 Stability 75 4.1.6.3 Summary 75 4.2 Functionalized Nanocomposites for Low Energy Consuming Optoelectronic Electrochromic Device 75 4.2.1 Electrochromism and Electrochromic Materials 75 4.2.2 Electrochromic Device 76 4.2.3 Nanostructured Electrodes for EC Devices 77 4.2.3.1 Nanotube 77 4.2.3.2 Nanowires 78 4.2.3.3 Nanoparticles 78 4.2.3.4 Conductive Nanobeads 79 4.2.4 Current Challenges in Electrochromism 82 4.3 Conclusion 82 References 83 5 Perovskite Solar Cell 91Erkin Shabdan, Blake Hanford, Baurzhan Ilyassov, Kadyrzhan Dikhanbayev, and Nurxat Nuraje 5.1 Introduction 91 5.2 Properties and Characteristics 92 5.2.1 Unit Cell 93 5.2.2 Madelung Constant and Lattice Energy 95 5.2.3 Phase Transition 95 5.2.4 Physical Properties 95 5.3 Solar Cell Application 97 5.3.1 Basic Solar Cell Operation 98 5.3.2 Fabrication of Perovskite Solar Cells 99 5.3.3 Stability of the Perovskite Material 104 5.3.4 Temperature Effects on Perovskite Material 106 5.3.5 Flexible Perovskite Materials 106 5.3.6 Perovskite Solar Cell Performance 107 5.4 Conclusion 108 References 109 6 Nanocomposite Structures Related to Electrospun Nanofibers for Highly Efficient and Cost-Effective Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells 113Xiaojing Ma, Fan Zheng, Yong Zhao, XiaoxuWang, Zhengtao Zhu, and Hao Fong 6.1 Introduction of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells 113 6.1.1 Solar Energy Absorption 114 6.1.2 Electron Transport in Photoanode 114 6.1.3 Dye Regeneration 115 6.2 Composites of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Electrospun TiO2 Nanofibers as Highly Efficient Photoanodes 116 6.3 Electrospun TiC/C Composite Nano-felt Surface Decorated with Pt Nanoparticles as a Cost-Effective Counter Electrode 121 6.4 Concluding Remarks 129 Acknowledgments 130 References 130 7 Colloidal Synthesis of Advanced Functional Nanostructured Composites and Alloys via Laser Ablation-Based Techniques 135Sheng Hu and Dibyendu Mukherjee 7.1 Introduction 135 7.1.1 Conventional Routes for Synthesizing NMs 135 7.1.2 Laser Ablation Synthesis in Solution (LASiS) 136 7.1.3 Laser Ablation Synthesis in Solution-Galvanic Replacement Reaction (LASiS-GRR) 138 7.1.4 Description of the LASiS/LASiS-GRR Setup 139 7.1.5 Applications of LASiS/LASiS-GRR for the Synthesis of Functional NCs and NAs 140 7.2 Synthesis of PtCo/CoOx NCs via LASiS-GRR as ORR/OER Bifunctional Electrocatalysts 141 7.2.1 Mechanistic Picture of LASiS-GRR 141 7.2.2 Structure and Composition Analysis for the PtCo/CoOx NCs 142 7.2.3 Investigation of ORR/OER Catalytic Activities 146 7.3 Synthesis of Pt-Based Binary and Ternary NAs as ORR Electrocatalysts for PEMFCs 148 7.3.1 PtCo NAs Synthesized with Different Pt Salt Concentrations 148 7.3.2 PtCo NAs Synthesized with Different pH Conditions 151 7.3.3 Synthesis of Pt-Based Ternary NAs 153 7.3.4 Investigation of ORR Electrocatalytic Activities 156 7.4 Synthesis of Hybrid CoOx/N-DopedGONCs as Bifunctional ORR Electrocatalysts/Supercapacitors 159 7.5 Conclusion and Future Directions 166 References 168 8 Thermoelectric Nanocomposite for Energy Harvesting 173Ehsan Ghafari, Frederico Severgnini, Seyedali Ghahari, Yining Feng, Eu Jin Lee, Chaoyi Zhang, Xiaodong Jiang, and Na Lu 8.1 Introduction 173 8.2 Fundamental of Thermoelectric Effect 176 8.2.1 Seebeck Effect 176 8.2.2 Thermal Conductivity 179 8.2.3 Electrical Conductivity 181 8.2.4 Figure of Merit 181 8.3 Historical Perspective of Thermoelectric Materials Development 182 8.3.1 Early Discovery ofThermoelectricity 182 8.3.2 TE Devices in Post-90 182 8.4 Thermoelectric Nanocomposites andTheir Processing Methods 185 8.4.1 Bismuth Telluride, PbTe, SbTe, Etc. 185 8.4.2 Emerging Materials: Silicides and Nitrides 187 8.4.3 SiGe and Other RTG Materials 189 8.4.4 Oxide 190 8.4.4.1 n-Type Oxide ZnO-Based Materials 190 8.4.4.2 p-Type Oxide 191 8.5 Thermoelectric Device Design and Characterizations 192 8.5.1 Device Physics and Calculation 192 8.5.2 TE Device Fabrication and Its Applications 194 References 197 9 Graphene Composite Catalysts for Electrochemical Energy Conversion 203GangWu and Ping Xu 9.1 Introduction 203 9.1.1 Graphene Catalysts 203 9.1.2 Applications for Energy Conversion 205 9.1.3 Challenge for Oxygen Electrocatalysis 206 9.2 Preparation of Graphene Catalysts 207 9.3 Graphene Catalysts for Energy Conversion 211 9.3.1 Reduced Graphene Oxide Catalysts 211 9.3.2 Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Composite Catalysts from Graphitization 216 9.3.3 Bifunctional Graphene Composite Catalysts 221 9.4 Summary and Perspective 223 Acknowledgments 223 References 223 10 Electrochromic Materials and Devices: Fundamentals and Nanostructuring Approaches 231DongyunMa, JinminWang, HuigeWei, and Zhanhu Guo 10.1 Introduction 231 10.2 Notes on History and Early Applications 232 10.3 Electrochromic Materials and Devices 233 10.3.1 Overview of Electrochromic Materials 233 10.3.1.1 Transition Metal Oxides 233 10.3.1.2 Prussian Blue and Transition Metal Hexacyanometallates 237 10.3.1.3 Conducting Polymers 237 10.3.1.4 Viologens 239 10.3.1.5 Transition Metal Coordination Complexes 240 10.3.1.6 Others 240 10.3.2 Constructions of Electrochromic Devices 241 10.4 Performance Parameters of Electrochromic Materials and Device 242 10.4.1 Contrast Ratio 242 10.4.2 Response Time 242 10.4.3 Coloration Efficiency 243 10.4.4 Cycle Life 243 10.5 Application of Nanostructures in Electrochromic Materials and Devices 243 10.5.1 Nanoparticles 244 10.5.2 One-Dimensional (1D) Nanostructures 247 10.5.3 Two-Dimensional (2D) Nanostructures 251 10.5.4 Nanocomposites 255 10.6 Conclusions and Perspective 258 References 259 11 Nanocomposite Photocatalysts for Solar Fuel Production from CO2 and Water 271Huilei Zhao and Ying Li 11.1 Introduction 271 11.2 Overview of Principles and Photocatalysts for CO2 Photoreduction 271 11.3 Experimental Apparatus and Methods for CO2 Photoreduction 273 11.3.1 Experimental System of Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction 273 11.3.2 Description of the DRIFTS System 274 11.4 Innovative TiO2 Materials Design for Promoted CO2 Photoreduction to Solar Fuels 275 11.4.1 Mixed-Phase Crystalline TiO2 for CO2 Photoreduction 275 11.4.1.1 Materials Synthesis and Characterization 276 11.4.1.2 Photocatalytic Activity of CO2 Photoreduction 277 11.4.2 TiO2 with Engineered Exposed Facets 278 11.4.2.1 Materials Synthesis and Characterization 279 11.4.2.2 Photocatalytic Activity of CO2 Photoreduction 280 11.4.2.3 Mechanism Investigation 282 11.4.3 Oxygen-Deficient TiO2 for CO2 Photoreduction 282 11.4.4 Cu/TiO2 with Different Cu Valances 286 11.4.4.1 Material Synthesis and Characterizations 286 11.4.4.2 Photocatalytic Activity of CO2 Photoreduction 286 11.4.4.3 Mechanism Investigation 287 11.4.5 TiO2 Modified with Enhanced CO2 Adsorption 289 11.4.5.1 MgO/TiO2 289 11.4.5.2 LDO/TiO2 295 11.4.5.3 Hybrid TiO2 with MgAl(LDO) 297 11.5 Conclusions 299 References 300 Contents to Volume 2 Preface xiii 12 The Applications of Nanocomposite Catalysts in Biofuel Production 309Xiaokun Yang, Kan Tang, Akkrum Nasr, and Hongfei Lin 12.1 Introduction 309 12.2 Bio-Gasoline 311 12.2.1 Alcohols and Polyols 312 12.2.2 Carbohydrates 312 12.2.3 Lignocellulosic Biomass 316 12.2.4 Lipids and Lactones 318 12.2.5 Lactones 320 12.3 Bio-Jet Fuels 320 12.3.1 Bio-Jet Fuels from Carbohydrates 322 12.3.1.1 Sugars 322 12.3.1.2 Hemicellulose/Cellulose 322 12.3.2 Lignin 326 12.3.3 Bio-Jet Fuels from Lignocellulose-Derived Platform Chemicals 326 12.3.3.1 Noble Metal on Porous Support 326 12.3.3.2 Bimetallic Nanocatalysts 329 12.3.4 Other Renewable Biomass Feedstock 332 12.4 Renewable Diesel Fuel 333 12.4.1 Hemicellulose/Cellulose 333 12.4.2 Lignocellulose Derivative Platforms 336 12.4.3 Plant Oils/Fatty Acids 337 12.5 Conclusion 340 References 340 Contents to Volume 1 vii 13 Photocatalytic Nanomaterials for the Energy and Environmental Application 353Zuzeng Qin, Tongming Su, and Hongbing Ji 13.1 Introduction 353 13.2 Preparation of Photocatalytic Nanomaterials 354 13.2.1 Solid-State Method 355 13.2.2 PrecipitationMethod 355 13.2.3 Hydrothermal Method 355 13.2.4 Sol–Gel Method 356 13.2.5 Solvothermal Method 356 13.2.6 Other PreparationMethods 356 13.3 Application of Photocatalytic Nanomaterials in the Energy 357 13.3.1 Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol 357 13.3.1.1 Different Kinds of Catalysts 358 13.3.1.2 Reaction Mechanism 364 13.3.2 Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Formate 365 13.3.2.1 Different Kinds of Catalysts 365 13.3.2.2 Reaction Mechanism 367 13.3.3 Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methane 368 13.3.3.1 Different Kinds of Catalysts 368 13.3.3.2 Reaction Mechanism 370 13.3.4 Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide 373 13.3.4.1 Different Kinds of Catalysts 373 13.3.4.2 Reaction Mechanism 374 13.3.5 Photocatalytic Reactor for CO2 Reduction 376 13.4 Application of Photocatalytic Nanomaterials in the Environment 381 13.4.1 Photocatalysts for Degradation of Organic Pollutant 382 13.4.2 Reaction Mechanism 386 13.4.3 Photocatalytic Reactor for Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Pollutant 387 13.5 Conclusion and Prospect 390 Acknowledgments 391 References 391 14 Role of Interfaces at Nano-Architectured Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production fromWater Splitting 403Rui Peng and ZiliWu 14.1 Introduction 403 14.2 Basic Principles of Hydrogen Generation from Photocatalytic Water Splitting 405 14.2.1 Main Processes of Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation 405 14.2.2 Approaches for Enhancement of Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Efficiency 408 14.2.2.1 Sacrificial Reagent 408 14.2.2.2 Cocatalyst 409 14.3 Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation System Composing Functions of Interface at Nano-Architectures 410 14.3.1 Metal–Semiconductor Interfaces 410 14.3.1.1 Schottky Barrier 410 14.3.1.2 Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production 414 14.3.2 Semiconductor–Semiconductor Interfaces 420 14.3.2.1 Semiconductor p–n Junction System 420 14.3.2.2 Non- p–n Heterojunction Semiconductor System 423 14.4 Summary and Prospects 427 Acknowledgments 428 References 428 15 Nanostructured Catalyst for Small Molecule Conversion 439Zhongyuan Huang, Jinbo Zhao, Haixiang Song, Yafei Kuang, and ZheWang 15.1 Supported 0D Structure 439 15.2 Unsupported 1D Nanostructures 445 15.3 Hierarchical Supportless Nanostructures 453 References 463 16 Rational Heterostructure Design for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting 467Shaohua Shen,MengWang, and Xiangyan Chen 16.1 Introduction 467 16.1.1 Fundamentals 467 16.1.2 Efficiency Evaluation 469 16.1.3 Materials for PhotoelectrochemicalWater Splitting 470 16.2 TiO2- and ZnO-Based Heterostructures 471 16.2.1 Quantum Dot (QD) Sensitization 471 16.2.2 Plasmonic Modification 474 16.2.3 Cocatalyst Decoration 479 16.2.4 Conductive MaterialModification 482 16.3 -Fe2O3-Based Heterostructures 483 16.3.1 Semiconductor Heterojunctions 485 16.3.2 Nanotextured Conductive Substrates 489 16.3.3 Surface Passivation 492 16.3.4 Cocatalyst Decoration 494 16.4 WO3- and BiVO4-Based Heterostructures 497 16.4.1 Coupling with Other Semiconductors 498 16.4.2 Coupling with Oxygen Evolution Catalysts 501 16.5 Cu2O- and CuO-Based Heterostructures 504 16.5.1 Cu2O and CuO Photocathodes 504 16.5.2 Heterostructure Design 504 16.6 Other Metal Oxide-Based Heterostructures 509 16.7 Summary and Perspectives 510 16.7.1 Mechanism Investigation 510 16.7.2 Construction of New Heterostructures 511 16.7.3 Tandem Cell for Overall PECWater Splitting 511 Acknowledgments 511 References 512 17 Layered Double Hydroxide-Derived NOx Storage and Reduction Catalysts for Vehicle NOx Emission Control 527Tianshan Xue,Wanlin Gao, XueyiMei, Yuhan Cui, and QiangWang 17.1 Introduction 527 17.1.1 Harm of Vehicle Exhausts 527 17.1.2 NOx Treatment Technology for Vehicle Exhausts 527 17.1.3 Chemical Constituent and Structure of LDHs 529 17.2 Mechanism of NOx Storage on LDH-Derived Catalysts 530 17.3 The Influence of LDH Chemical Composition on NSR 531 17.4 The Influence of Other Key Parameters 533 17.4.1 The Influence of Calcination Temperature 533 17.4.2 The Influence of Base Metal Loading 534 17.4.3 The Influence of Noble Metal Loading 535 17.5 Conclusions 537 References 538 18 Applications of Nanomaterials in NuclearWaste Management 543Yawen Yuan, HuaWang, Shifeng Hou, and Deying Xia 18.1 Introduction 543 18.2 Applications of Nanomaterials in Removal of Radionuclides from RadioactiveWastes 544 18.2.1 Graphene-Related Nanomaterials 545 18.2.2 Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) 548 18.2.3 Magnetic Nanoparticles 549 18.2.4 Silver-Related Nanomaterials for I? Removal 551 18.2.5 Ion Exchange Nanomaterials 553 18.2.6 Mesoporous Silica 554 18.2.7 Other Nanomaterials 556 18.3 Conclusion and Perspectives 557 References 560 19 Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Polymer Nanocomposites 567Xingru Yan, Licheng Xiang, Qingliang He, Junwei Gu, Jing Dang, Jiang Guo, and Zhanhu Guo 19.1 Introduction 567 19.2 Criteria to Evaluate the Shielding Effectiveness 571 19.2.1 Conductive ShieldingMaterials with Negligible Magnetic Property 571 19.2.2 Conductive Shielding Materials with Magnetic Property 573 19.2.3 Theoretical Analysis 574 19.2.3.1 Magnetic Loss 574 19.2.3.2 Eddy Current Loss 574 19.2.3.3 Magnetic Hysteresis Loss 574 19.2.3.4 Residual Loss 574 19.3 Why EMI Shielding Polymer Nanocomposites? 575 19.3.1 Carbon-Based Nanofillers 575 19.3.2 Metal-Based Nanofillers 583 19.3.3 Conductive Polymer-Based Nanofillers 590 19.3.4 Other Nanofillers 593 19.4 Conclusion and Perspective 593 References 594 20 Mussel-Inspired Nanocomposites: Synthesis and Promising Applications in Environmental Fields 603Lu Shao, Xiaobin Yang, ZhenxingWang, and Libo Zhang 20.1 Introduction 603 20.2 Preparation, Structure, Mechanism, and Properties of Mussel-Inspired PDA 605 20.2.1 Polymerization Conditions and Process 605 20.2.2 Possible Structures and Adhesion Mechanisms 609 20.2.3 Surface Modification Methods Based on PDA 615 20.2.4 Other Physicochemical Properties of PDA 622 20.2.4.1 Good Acid Resistance and Poor Alkaline Resistance 622 20.2.4.2 Ultraviolet Resistance 623 20.2.4.3 Carbon Precursor 624 20.3 Mussel-Inspired Materials forWastewater Treatment 626 20.3.1 Mussel-Inspired SpecialWettable Materials for Oil/Water Separation 626 20.3.1.1 PDA-Based Nanoparticles 627 20.3.1.2 PDA-Based Textiles 628 20.3.1.3 PDA-Based Foams 628 20.3.1.4 PDA-Based Membranes 631 20.3.2 Mussel-Inspired Adsorbents for Removal of Heavy Metal, Organic Pollutants, and Bacterial fromWater 633 20.3.2.1 Pure PDA Nanoparticles 633 20.3.2.2 Magnetic Core–Shell Nanoparticles 633 20.3.2.3 PDA Compound with Lamellar Structure 634 20.3.2.4 Mussel-Inspired Adsorbents Based on Other Inorganic Materials 637 20.3.2.5 PDA-Modified Porous Polymer Membrane 638 20.3.3 Mussel-Inspired Catalysts for Degradation of Organic Pollutants 640 20.4 Outlook 643 References 644 Index 651
ZhaZhanhu Guo is Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from Louisiana State University, USA, followed by postdoctoral studies in mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, USA. He was the Chair of the Composite Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers in 2010-2011. Dr. Guo's Integrated Composites Laboratory focuses on multifunctional nanocomposites for energy, environmental and electronic devices applications. Yuan Chen is Professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The University of Sydney, Australia. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from Yale University. Before joining The University of Sydney, he was Associate Professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, where he served as Head of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Division in 2011-2014. His research focuses on carbon nanomaterials for sustainable energy and environmental applications. He received several awards including Australian Research Council Future Fellowship in 2017 and Young Scientist Awards by the Singapore National Academy of Science in 2011. Na (Luna) Lu is an associate professor of the Lyles School of Civil Engineering and School of Materials Engineering at Purdue University. She has research interests/expertise in using nanotechnology to tailor a material's (electrical, thermal, mechanical, and optical) properties for renewable energy applications, in particular, thermoelectric, piezoelectric and solar cells. Fundamentally, her group studies electron, phonon, and photon transport mechanisms for a given materials system, and designs the transport properties to meet the targeted performance. Her research work has been featured in national and regional media. She is the recipient of a 2014 National Science Foundation Yong Investigator CAREER Award.

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