Details

Construction Manager's BIM Handbook


Construction Manager's BIM Handbook


1. Aufl.

von: John Eynon

48,00 €

Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 27.06.2016
ISBN/EAN: 9781118896464
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 256

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

Building Information Modelling (BIM) harnesses digital technologies to unlock more efficient methods of designing, creating and maintaining built environment assets, so the Construction Manager’s BIM Handbook ensures the reader understands what BIM is, what the UK strategy is and what it means for key roles in the construction team. ensure that all readers understand what BIM and are fully aware of the implications of BIM for them and their organisations provides concise summaries of key aspects of BIM ensure that all readers can begin to adopt this approach in future projects includes industry case studies illustrating the use of BIM on large and small projects
Foreword xiii Introduction xv Acknowledgements xviii Glossary xix Notes on Contributors xx PART I: INTRODUCTION 1 What is BIM? 3John Eynon 2 Why BIM? 6John Eynon 2.1 The mandate 6 2.2 Benefits 7 2.3 Digital context 7 3 BIM, Buildings and Infrastructure 9John Eynon 3.1 3D geometry 10 3.2 4D time 10 3.3 5D cost 11 3.4 6D FM and lifecycle 11 3.5 Simulations: lighting, fire, people movement, thermal, carbon, energy 11 3.6 Operations + maintenance manuals and information 12 3.7 Visualisations 12 3.8 Site safety planning 12 3.9 Fittings, fixtures and equipment 12 3.10 Offsite manufacture 12 3.11 Lifecycle costing and management 13 3.12 Facilities management/building operations 13 3.13 Recycling 13 3.14 RFID (radio frequency identity tag) 13 3.15 Refurb/retrofit 14 3.16 3D printing 14 3.17 Automated construction 15 3.18 Validation and compliance 15 3.19 Infrastructure 15 4 BIM and Infrastructure 16Phil Jackson 4.1 Introduction 16 4.2 In infrastructure the asset is the business 16 4.3 Infrastructure is messy 17 4.4 Federated infrastructure models 19 4.5 Specific infrastructure issues 21 4.6 Tools and data management issues 22 PART II: PEOPLE 5 Collaboration 27John Eynon 5.1 Introduction 27 5.2 Changing times 28 5.3 Tribes 29 5.4 What makes a tribe? 30 5.4.1 The Tribe of Design 30 5.4.2 The Tribe of Construct 31 5.5 Processes in conflict 32 5.6 Transition 33 5.7 One tribe 33 5.7.1 The Tribe of Solutions 33 5.8 It’s in the DNA 34 5.9 Teamthink 35 5.10 Individual and team dynamics 36 5.11 Fun and joy 37 5.12 Know yourself 37 5.13 Values 37 6 Collaborative Working 39Anne Kemp 6.1 Introduction 39 6.2 The way into the problem: a systemic approach 40 6.3 The missing pieces to instil collaborative working 42 6.4 Instigating change 46 6.5 Looking to the individual 47 6.6 Turning to leadership: and the energy to empower individuals … 47 6.7 … and the responsibility of teams 47 6.8 Walking the talk 49 6.9 The energy within 50 6.10 Conclusions 50 6.11 Practical action points 54 References 55 7 Leadership Choices 56Saima Butt Reference 59 PART III: PROCESS 8 BSI B555 Roadmap 63British Standards Institution 8.1 Introduction 63 8.2 Maturity level definitions 65 8.3 Key Roadmap deliveries 66 8.3.1 Delivery 1: 2011–present–object libraries 66 8.3.2 Delivery 2: 2013–14–process and data management 67 8.3.3 Delivery 3: 2015–onwards–guidance documents 69 8.3.4 Other BSI BIM publications 69 9 UK BIM Level 2: Key Documents 70John Eynon 9.1 But first … What is UK BIM Level 2? 71 9.2 Conclusion 75 10 NBS BIM Toolkit: An Overview 76Stephen Hamil 10.1 What exactly is the BIM Toolkit? 76 10.2 What benefits will the digital BIM Toolkit deliver? 77 10.3 What happens next? 79 11 BIM-ing the Team 80John Eynon 11.1 Smart world 80 11.2 The Swamp 81 11.3 Principles of the way it will be … 81 11.4 BIM-ing the team 83 11.4.1 The construction manager 83 11.4.2 Pre-construction manager and delivery construction manager 84 11.4.3 Design manager 85 11.4.4 Estimator, quantity surveyor, commercial manager 85 11.4.5 BIM manager, coordinator 86 11.5 The final stretch 86 11.6 And finally for this chapter … 87 12 BIM Level 2: Legal Perspective 89Sarah Rock 12.1 EIR and BEP: design and build for BIM 89 12.2 The BIM Protocol 90 12.3 The information manager 91 12.4 BIM competency 91 12.5 Standards 91 12.6 Intellectual property 92 12.7 Security of data 92 12.8 Key documents 92 12.9 Legal conclusions 93 PART IV: WIDER CONTEXT 13 5D BIM: Cost 97Adrien Guillemet 14 BIM and Facilities Management 101Kath Fontana 14.1 Introduction 101 14.2 Collaboration between facilities management practitioners and other built environment disciplines 101 14.3 Facilities management and information management 102 14.4 Data exchange and COBie 103 14.5 Government Soft Landings 105 14.6 Conclusions 106 15 Cyber Security 107Steve Race 15.1 Architects Registration Board (ARB) Clause 4.3 108 15.2 Sensitive building typologies 109 15.3 Servers 109 15.4 Virtual participants 110 15.5 The Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Code of Practice–Cyber Security in the Built Environment 111 15.6 Ending 112 16 Level 2, Level 3 and Beyond… 113Mark Bew 16.1 Introduction 113 16.2 What is the BIM Programme all about? 113 16.3 Level 2 114 16.4 The next phase: Level 3 BIM 117 16.5 Conclusions and next steps 119 17 The Next Construction Revolution 121Richard Threlfall 18 BIM and the Future of Design Management 123Stephen Emmitt 18.1 Future challenges 124 18.2 What is to become of the design manager? 125 Further reading 126 19 BIM and Social Media 127Fred Mills 19.1 The social duty of Generation Y 127 19.2 Generational advantage 127 19.3 Implications for AEC 128 19.4 The Y-bridge 129 19.4.1 Support to knowledge sharing 129 19.4.2 Support to the project delivery and asset management (BIM) workflows 130 19.4.3 Democratisation of built asset delivery and operation 131 20 BIM Leaders of the Future: Engaging the Digital Generation 133Alison Watson 20.1 Introduction 133 20.2 Time flies: how six years can make all the difference 134 20.3 The challenges in engaging the Digital Generation 135 20.4 In conclusion: less is more 138 20.5 Five things to do today if you want to change the future 140 Further reading 141 21 Getting Started – BIM Implementation and SMEs 142John Eynon 21.1 Eating the #BIMelephant! 142 21.2 Resource number one–assessment and BEP 142 21.3 Resource number two–Task Group website 143 21.4 Resource number three–the BIM cube 143 21.5 Resource number four–support 144 21.6 Conclusion 144 21.7 As for the #BIMelephant! … ! 144 22 Afterword: BIM, Digital Life and the Third Industrial Revolution 146John Eynon 22.1 The pace of digital evolution 146 22.2 What does it mean for us? 147 22.3 The Third Industrial Revolution 148 22.4 For Generation Z … it’s as natural as breathing‘ 148 22.5 2016 and beyond 149 PART V: APPENDICES Appendix A BIM Dictionary 153 Appendix B BIM Acronyms 175 Appendix C Digital Built Britain BIM Level 3 Strategy 186 Appendix D1 Software: Introduction 187 Appendix D2 Collaboration Tools 191 Appendix E1 Synchro Oakwood 4D Model Case Study 193 Appendix E2 Synchro HARBORcenter Case Study 207 Appendix E3 Autodesk Case Study: The New Way of Working 211 Appendix E4 Bentley Case Study: Dˆwr Cymru Welsh Water Deploys Bentley’s ProjectWise to Improve Team Collaboration 216 Bibliography 219 Index 225
John Eynon BA BArch RIBA FCIOB MAPM CEnv has worked in the public and private sectors in architectural practice, main contracting and consulting and for the last 15 years he has been involved in design management and pre-construction process for major contractors. He has been responsible for design management teams and design leadership at all stages of the design and construction process. He now provides BIM consultancy, design management and work winning services through his company Open Water Consulting.
Building Information Modelling (BIM) harnesses digital technologies to unlock more efficient methods of designing, creating and maintaining built environment assets. BIM embeds key product and asset data with a 3 dimensional model of a built asset, which can be used to foster a collaborative way of working and effective management of information throughout a project lifecycle. The UK government is encouraging the adoption of BIM by mandating that all central government departments adopt collaborative Level 2 BIM (file based collaboration and library management) by 2016 for all construction projects. The Construction Manager?s BIM Handbook ensures the reader understands what BIM is, what the UK strategy is and what it means for key roles in the construction team. By providing concise summaries of key aspects of BIM, explaining the government documents and intentions, and providing pointers on implementation all readers will be fully aware of the implications of BIM for them and their organisations, and can begin to adopt this approach in future projects.

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