Details

A Legal Guide for Student Affairs Professionals


A Legal Guide for Student Affairs Professionals

(Updated and Adapted from The Law of Higher Education, 4th Edition)
2. Aufl.

von: William A. Kaplin, Barbara A. Lee

80,99 €

Verlag: Jossey-Bass
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 22.12.2009
ISBN/EAN: 9780470623626
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 864

DRM-geschütztes eBook, Sie benötigen z.B. Adobe Digital Editions und eine Adobe ID zum Lesen.

Beschreibungen

The student affairs market has experienced a great boom in the last decade. Based on the fourth edition of the indispensable guide to the laws that bear on the conduct of higher education, this updated student affairs edition provides a reference and guide for student affairs practitioners and graduate students in student affairs administration courses. This volume combines sections that are pertinent to student affairs practitioners, as well as the government regulatory and administrative issues found in the full Fourth Edition. It is thus the most comprehensive and easy-to-use volume for student affairs officers and students.
Notice of Web Site and Periodic Supplements for This Edition v Preface xvii Acknowledgements xxv The Authors xxix PART ONE PERSPECTIVES AND FOUNDATIONS 1 1 Overview of Higher Education Law 3 1.1. How Far the Law Reaches and How Loud It Speaks 3 1.2. Evolution of Higher Education Law 7 1.3. The Governance of Higher Education 9 1.3.1. Basic concepts and distinctions 9 1.3.2. Internal governance 12 1.3.3. External governance 13 1.4. Sources of Higher Education Law 16 1.4.1. Overview 16 1.4.2. External sources of law 16 1.4.3. Internal sources of law 20 1.4.4. The role of case law 23 1.5. The Public-Private Dichotomy 23 1.5.1. Overview 23 1.5.2. The state action doctrine 25 1.5.3. Other bases for legal rights in private institutions 33 1.6. Religion and the Public-Private Dichotomy 35 1.6.1. Overview 35 1.6.2. Religious autonomy rights of religious institutions and individuals 36 1.6.3. Government support for religious institutions 38 1.6.4. Religious autonomy rights of individuals in public postsecondary institutions 45 Selected Annotated Bibliography 49 2. Legal Planning and Dispute Resolution 57 2.1. Legal Liability 57 2.1.1. Overview 57 2.1.2. Types of liability 58 2.1.3. Agency law 58 2.1.4. Enforcement mechanisms 58 2.1.5. Remedies for legal violations 59 2.1.6. Avoiding legal liability 60 2.1.7. Treatment law and preventive law 60 2.2. Litigation in the Courts 66 2.2.1. Overview 66 2.2.2. Judicial remedies 68 2.2.3. Judicial (academic) deference 72 2.2.4. Managing litigation and the threat of litigation 77 2.3. Alternate Dispute Resolution 79 2.3.1. Overview 79 2.3.2. Types of ADR 80 2.3.3. Applications to colleges and universities 83 2.4. Institutional Management of Liability Risk 85 2.4.1 Overview and suggestions 85 2.4.2 Risk avoidance and risk control 86 2.4.3. Risk transfer 86 2.4.4. Risk retention 91 2.4.5. Legal limits on authority to transfer risk 92 2.5. The Relationship Between Law and Policy 94 Selected Annotated Bibliography 98 PART TWO THE COLLEGE, ITS GOVERNING BOARD, AND EMPLOYEES 103 3. The College and Its Trustees 105 3.1. The Question of Authority 105 3.1.1. Overview 105 3.1.2. Trustee authority 108 3.2. Institutional Tort Liability 109 3.2.1. Overview 109 3.2.2. Negligence 112 3.2.3. Educational malpractice 127 3.3. Institutional Contract Liability 128 3.4. Institutional Liability for Violating Federal Constitutional Rights (Section 1983 Liability) 132 Selected Annotated Bibliography 138 4. The College and Its Employees 142 4.1. Overview of Employment Relationships 142 4.2. Employment Contracts 144 4.2.1. Defi ning the contract 144 4.2.2. The at-will doctrine 145 4.3. Collective Bargaining 145 4.3.1. Overview 145 4.3.2. The public-private dichotomy in collective bargaining 146 4.3.3. Collective bargaining and antidiscrimination laws 146 4.4. Personal Liability of Employees 149 4.4.1. Overview 149 4.4.2. Tort liability 149 4.4.3. Contract liability 152 4.4.4. Constitutional liability (personal liability under Section 1983) 153 4.5. Employment Discrimination 159 4.5.1. Overview: The interplay of statutes, regulations, and constitutional protections 159 4.5.2. Sources of law 160 4.6. Affirmative Action 182 4.6.1. Overview 182 4.6.2. Affirmative action under Title VII 185 4.6.3. Affirmative action under the equal protection clause 188 4.7. Application of Nondiscrimination Laws to Religious Institutions 190 4.8. Faculty Academic Freedom and Freedom of Expression 196 4.8.1. General concepts and principles 196 4.8.2. Academic freedom in teaching 214 4.8.3. Academic freedom in religious colleges and universities 232 Selected Annotated Bibliography 235 PART THREE THE COLLEGE AND ITS STUDENTS 241 5. The Legal Status of Students 243 5.1. The Legal Status of Students 243 5.1.1. Overview 243 5.1.2 The age of majority 244 5.2. The Contractual Rights of Students 244 5.3. Student Academic Freedom 253 5.4. Students’ Legal Relationships with Other Students 262 5.5. Student Files and Records 269 5.5.1. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) 269 5.5.2 State law 273 Selected Annotated Bibliography 278 6. Admissions and Financial Aid 280 6.1. Admissions 280 6.1.1. Basic legal requirements 280 6.1.2. Arbitrariness 281 6.1.3 The contract theory 283 6.1.4. The principle of nondiscrimination 284 6.1.5. Affirmative action programs 301 6.1.6. Readmission 327 6.2. Financial Aid 330 6.2.1. General principles 330 6.2.2. Federal programs 332 6.2.3. Nondiscrimination 336 6.2.4. Affirmative action in financial aid programs 338 6.2.5. Discrimination against nonresidents 343 6.2.6. Discrimination against aliens 349 Selected Annotated Bibliography 355 7. The Campus Community 359 7.1. Student Housing 359 7.1.1. Housing regulations 359 7.1.2. Searches and seizures 365 7.2. Campus Computer Networks 371 7.2.1. Freedom of speech 371 7.2.2. Liability issues 377 7.3. Campus Security 380 7.3.1. Security officers 380 7.3.2. Protecting students against violent crime 383 7.3.3. Federal statutes and campus security 387 7.4. Other Support Services 390 7.4.1. Overview 390 7.4.2. Health services 391 7.4.3. Services for students with disabilities 394 7.4.4. Services for international students 396 7.4.5. Legal services 398 Selected Annotated Bibliography 399 8. Academic Policies and Concerns 402 8.1. Overview 402 8.2. Awarding of Grades and Degrees 402 8.3. Sexual Harassment of Students by Faculty Members 410 8.4. Evaluating Students with Disabilities 426 8.4.1. Overview 426 8.4.2. The concept of disability 427 8.4.3. Notice and documentation of disabilities 430 8.4.4. Requests for programmatic or instructional accommodations 432 Selected Annotated Bibliography 438 9. The Disciplinary Process 441 9.1. Disciplinary and Grievance Systems 441 9.1.1. Overview 441 9.1.2. Establishment of systems 441 9.1.3. Codes of student conduct 443 9.1.4. Judicial systems 446 9.2. Disciplinary Rules and Regulations 451 9.2.1. Overview 451 9.2.2. Public institutions 451 9.2.3. Private institutions 453 9.2.4. Disciplining students with psychiatric illnesses 454 9.3. Procedures for Suspension, Dismissal, and Other Sanctions 456 9.3.1. Overview 456 9.3.2. Public institutions: Disciplinary sanctions 457 9.3.3. Public institutions: The legal distinction between disciplinary sanctions and academic sanctions 466 9.3.4. Private institutions 470 Selected Annotated Bibliography 474 10. Students’ Freedom of Expression 478 10.1. Student Protests and Freedom of Speech 478 10.1.1. Student free speech in general 478 10.1.2. The “public forum” concept 480 10.1.3. Regulation of student protest 486 10.1.4. Prior approval of protest activities 492 10.1.5. Posters and leaflets 493 10.1.6. Protests in the classroom 496 10.2. Speech Codes and the Problem of Hate Speech 498 10.2.1. Hate speech and the campus 498 10.2.2. The case law on hate speech and speech codes 499 10.2.3. Guidelines for dealing with hate speech on campus 506 Selected Annotated Bibliography 508 PART FOUR: THE COLLEGE AND ITS STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 511 11. Student Organizations and Their Members 513 11.1. Student Organizations 513 11.1.1. The right to organize 513 11.1.2. The right not to join, or associate, or subsidize 519 11.1.3. Mandatory student activities fees 520 11.1.4. Principle of nondiscrimination 526 11.1.5. Religious activities 531 11.2. Fraternities and Sororities 538 11.2.1. Overview 538 11.2.2. Institutional recognition and regulation of fraternal organizations 539 11.2.3. Institutional liability for the acts of fraternal organizations 545 11.3. The Student Press 549 11.3.1. General principles 549 11.3.2. Mandatory student fee allocations to student publications 550 11.3.3. Permissible scope of institutional regulation 551 11.3.4. Obscenity 559 11.3.5. Libel 561 11.3.6. Obscenity and libel in private institutions 565 Selected Annotated Bibliography 565 12. Athletics 568 12.1. General Principles 568 12.2. Athletes’ Due Process Rights 569 12.3. Athletes’ Freedom of Speech 570 12.4. Pertinent Statutory Law 573 12.5. Athletic Scholarships 574 12.6. Sex Discrimination 578 12.7. Discrimination on the Basis of Disability 589 12.8. Drug Testing 591 12.9. Tort Liability for Athletic Injuries 596 Selected Annotated Bibliography 601 PART FIVE: THE COLLEGE AND THE OUTSIDE WORLD 605 13. Local and State Governments 607 13.1. Local Governments and the Local Community 607 13.1.1. Overview of local government authority 607 13.1.2. Community access to the college’s campus 611 13.1.3. Community activities of students 638 13.1.4. Zoning 640 13.1.5. Student voting in the community 643 13.2. State Government 648 13.2.1. Overview of state government authority 648 13.2.2. State provision of public postsecondary education 651 13.2.3. State chartering and licensure of private postsecondary institutions 653 13.2.4. Open meetings and public disclosure 657 13.2.5. Open records laws 661 13.2.6. State administrative procedure laws 667 Selected Annotated Bibliography 669 14. The Federal Government 672 14.1. Overview of Federal Government Authority 672 14.1.1. Federal constitutional powers over education 672 14.1.2. Federal regulation of postsecondary education 673 14.2. Copyright Law 675 14.2.1. Overview 675 14.2.2. The fair use doctrine 676 14.2.3. Performance rights 681 14.2.4. Liability for infringement 683 14.2.5. Licensing 687 14.2.6. Other copyright issues 687 14.3. Trademark Law 690 14.4. Antitrust Law 696 14.5. Americans with Disabilities Act 702 14.6. Laws Regulating Computer Network Communications 705 14.6.1. Overview 705 14.6.2. Computer statutes 706 14.6.3. General statutes 714 14.7. Federal Taxation of Postsecondary Education 718 14.7.1. Introduction and overview 718 14.7.2. Tax rules regarding students 719 14.8. Federal Aid-to-Education Programs 722 14.8.1. Functions and history 722 14.8.2. Legal structure of federal aid programs 723 14.9. Civil Rights Compliance 725 14.9.1. General considerations 725 14.9.2. Title VI 726 14.9.3. Title IX 735 14.9.4. Section 504 738 14.9.5. Coverage of unintentional discriminatory acts 741 14.10. Dealing with the Federal Government 744 14.10.1. Handling federal rule making and regulations 744 14.10.2. Obtaining information 748 Selected Annotated Bibliography 750 15. Private Entities 758 15.1. Education Associations 758 15.2. Accrediting Agencies 760 15.3. Athletic Associations and Conferences 762 15.3.1. Overview 762 15.3.2. Federal constitutional constraints 763 15.3.3. State statutes regulating athletic associations’ enforcement activities 766 15.3.4. Antitrust laws 768 15.3.5. Common law principles 771 15.3.6. Federal civil rights statutes 772 15.4. Private Business 780 15.4.1. Overview 780 15.4.2. Auxiliary enterprises 781 15.4.3. State noncompetition statutes 788 15.4.4. Federal antitrust law 790 Selected Annotated Bibliography 792 Appendix A. Constitution of the United States of America: Provisions of Particular Interest to Postsecondary Education 794 Cases Index 799 Statute Index 811 Subject Index 815
WILLIAM A. KAPLIN is professor of law emeritus at The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC, where he also served as special counsel to the Office of General Counsel. He is now senior fellow at the Center for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy, Stetson University College of Law. BARBARA A. LEE is professor of human resource management at Rutgers University’s School of Management and Labor Relations and of counsel to the law firm of Edwards Wildman Palmer. An attorney, she teaches employment law and higher education law. Together they are the authors of The Law of Higher Education, now in its fifth edition.

Diese Produkte könnten Sie auch interessieren:

Data-Driven Leadership
Data-Driven Leadership
von: Amanda Datnow, Vicki Park
EPUB ebook
23,99 €
Future Wise
Future Wise
von: David Perkins
EPUB ebook
19,99 €